Tag: Kris Humphries

Washington Wizards v Charlotte Hornets

Free agent big man Kevin Seraphin wants to start somewhere


Kevin Seraphin finally got a chance to play key minutes for the Washington Wizards in Game 7 against Hawks — only because Marcin Gortat had food poisoning.

Which sums up where the fifth-year big man has been for a while. He’s been stuck behind the big-man duo of Marcin Gortat and Nene, plus the Wizards have plenty of size up front (Kris Humphries, Drew Gooden, DeJuan Blair). Seraphin, undersized for a center at 6’9″, and his back-to-the-basket game got 15 minutes a night. His game took small steps forward this season, but never really fit with the attacking John Wall/Ramon Sessions guard tandem.

What Seraphin wants to do is start — which would mean leaving the Wizards this summer. Here is what he told J.Michael of CSNWashington.com.

“I definitely want a chance to be a starter,” Seraphin, who matched his career high with 79 regular-season appearances but didn’t start a game for the 46-win Wizards, told CSNwashington.com. “I definitely want to be somewhere I have a chance to be a starter.”


“If I really want to learn — it’s easy to say, ‘Yeah, stay on the bench’ — but in basketball or any sport it’s best to be on the court,” said Seraphin, who averaged 6.6 points and 3.6 rebounds in 15.6 minutes per game and came into camp at about 20 pounds lighter at 270. “The first John Wall I saw in my life, remember that was the game in Philly the first game, he wasn’t the same John as right now. It’s because he played all those years and everything. He learned. He became a better player. I remember the John who used to run, get charges all the time. Now he controls the game better. He became an All-Star because he had the talent, he had the opportunity and everything. That’s basically what I want. I want to play. I really want to play and have a chance to prove what I can do.”

He’s not going to be starting for Washington, Gortat signed a five-year, $60 million deal last summer. Gortat is entrenched.

There likely will be teams willing to pitch Seraphin more minutes and the chance to start, but he’s going to have to earn that spot. His skill set will attract teams, although many may be looking for a backup. He did better this season addressing weaknesses such as not fouling, and he’s passing better. But there are limits to his game — nearly 50 percent of his shots come within eight feet of the rim, and while he can step out a little along the baselines he’s not exactly a floor spacer.

The teams likely to give him an opportunity for the minutes and chance to start are ones that are not very good — certainly not as good as a Wizards team that made the second round. That doesn’t seem to be the big issue, what he wants is a chance, one he’s not going to get in Washington. Wherever he lands he’ll get more than the $3.9 million he made this season.

Adjusting for playoff rotations round two: Watch out for the Wizards

Kent Bazemore, John Wall, Paul Pierce

Before the playoffs began, I assessed each team based on projected postseason rotation.

Here’s the idea:

In an attempt to get better data, I’ve used nba wowy! to rank playoff teams by regular-season net rating (offensive rating minus defensive rating), counting only the lineups that include five players projected to be in the team’s post-season rotation.

This measure is far from perfect. It doesn’t account for opponent or weigh lineups based on how often they’ll be used in the postseason, and it’s impossible to precisely predict a team’s playoff rotation.

The system and straight seeding differed twice for the first round, each method correctly predicting one of those two series:

  • My projection correct: Wizards over Raptors
  • Seeding correct: Bucks over Bulls

We now have more information – both about which players actually made the postseason rotation and how teams fared in the first round.

Here are the new adjusted ratings from full regular season to pre-playoff projection to pre-second round projection (counting first-round games and updating the postseason rotation when necessary):


5. Washington Wizards

  • Offensive rating: 104.3 to 107.7 to 112.3
  • Defensive rating: 103.5 to 101.1 to 100.9
  • Net rating: +0.8 to +6.6 to +11.4

Kevin Seraphin, not Kris Humphries as I predicted, made the playoff rotation. That would have boosted the Wizards’ pre-playoff projection even higher, and they were already a sleeper based on this model.

A sweep of the Raptors supported all the positivity these numbers suggested about Washington.

2. Cleveland Cavaliers

  • Offensive rating: 111.7 to 118.2 to 114.2
  • Defensive rating: 106.9 to 101.0 to 105.6
  • Net rating: +4.8 to +17.2 to +8.6

I left James Jones out of my projected playoff rotation. Including him would have weakened the Cavaliers’ pre-playoff adjusted numbers on both ends of the floor, but they still would have ranked second in the league behind the Warriors for adjusted net rating.

Of course, Kevin Love is the big issue headed into the next round. It’s unclear how David Blatt will replace the power forward, but I added Mike Miller and Shawn Marion to the rotation. If it’s just one of the two or neither with no other replacement, the Cavs’ adjusted net rating would be a little better.

Remove J.R. Smith, who’s suspended the first two games though counted as part of the rotation here, and Cleveland actually fares a little better on both ends (with Miller and Marion in the rotation) than it would with Smith.

Still, the picture is clear: Cleveland gets downgraded significantly without Love. Enough to lose to the Bulls? Not according to this model.

3. Chicago Bulls

  • Offensive rating: 107.7 to 108.6 to 108.4
  • Defensive rating: 104. 4 to 103.3 to 102.5
  • Net rating: +3.3 to +5.3 to +5.9

I didn’t include Tony Snell in the Bulls’ playoff rotation, but he stuck, even when Kirk Hinrich was healthy. Had I included Snell, Chicago would have fared slightly better in my first-round projections.

To the surprise of many, the Bucks pushed the Bulls to six games, but that doesn’t give me pause about Chicago. The pre-playoff projection was high on Milwaukee, and though the model actually rated the Bucks above the Bulls, I think the actual result showed the point of the projection. It’s one data point of many, and the lesson should have been that the first-round series could be closer than expected – which happened.

1. Atlanta Hawks

  • Offensive rating: 109.6 to 109.9 to 110.0
  • Defensive rating: 103.8 to 104.9 to 105.1
  • Net rating: +5.8 to +5.0 to +4.9

I incorrectly left Shelvin Mack out of the predicted rotation, though he wouldn’t have changed much.

There were reasons to be concerned about the Hawks entering the playoffs based on this model. A six-game series against the Nets was surprising, because Brooklyn also looked weak. But the first-round matchup also exposed issues with Atlanta this model predicted.

Pick the No. 1 seed to advance at your own risk.


1. Golden State Warriors

  • Offensive rating: 111.7 to 116.4 to 114.7
  • Defensive rating: 101.3 to 95.7 to 99.1
  • Net rating: +10.4 to +20.7 to +15.6

I didn’t include Marreese Speights and Leandro Barbosa in the Warriors’ rotation, but Steve Kerr did. If I had, Golden State’s projection would have suffered on both ends of the floor.

The Warriors are favored here regardless, but I believe if necessary, they can trim their rotation and become even stronger.

3. Los Angeles Clippers

  • Offensive rating: 113.2 to 117.5 to 118.8
  • Defensive rating: 106.3 to 105.9 to 105.4
  • Net rating: +6.9 to +11.6 to +13.4

I mistakenly had Spencer Hawes in the playoff rotation, but it’s clear Doc Rivers doesn’t trust him. Removing Hawes doesn’t make much difference, though it improves the Clippers’ adjusted rating a bit on both ends of the floor.

The big issue: Will Chris Paul be healthy? A playoff rotation without him projects to have an offensive/defensive/net rating of 97.0/108.1/-11.1. That’s disastrous, but it’s a small sample and overly relies on bench-heavy units. Blake Griffin and the Clippers’ other starters just didn’t play that much without Paul.

If Paul is healthy, the Clippers rate better than the Rockets. If not, lower – though it’s not clear just how much lower Los Angeles actually should be.

2. Houston Rockets

  • Offensive rating: 107.5 to 110.1 to 112.3
  • Defensive rating: 104.0 to 101.0  to 101.2
  • Net rating: 3.5 to +9.1 to +11.1

Clint Capela, not Joey Dorsey, was Houston’s backup center – and that would have boosted their pre-playoff projection on both ends of the floor.

For the most part, the Rockets are the steadier team in their second-round matchup. It’s Paul’s health that should determine everything.

Make no mistake, though: Houston’s playoff rotation is good and will require the Clippers to play well to advance.

5. Memphis Grizzlies

  • Offensive rating: 106.2 to 108.0 to 109.1
  • Defensive rating: 102.7 to 102.7 to 102.8
  • Net rating: +3.5 to +5.3 to +6.3

I included Mike Conley in this projection. If he can’t play, the offensive/defensive/net splits go to 107.3/101.6+5.7.

That’s not as large a drop as I anticipated, but it probably doesn’t matter much. The Grizzlies land well behind the Warriors either way.

Report: Celtics express willingness to take salary dumps

Danny Ainge

When a team no longer wants to pay a player, Sam Hinkie is on speed dial.

The Philadelphia 76ers have made trades for Jared Cunningham, Andrei Kirilenko, Ronny Turiaf, Travis Outlaw, Marquis Teague, Keith Bogans Hasheem Thabeet – not a single one of whom has played for the 76ers this season.

Philadelphia takes and waives (or attempts to flip) these players so their previous teams don’t have to. The previous team gets cap relief and/or a trade exception, and the 76ers get a draft pick for their trouble.

But the Celtics want to make clear Philadelphia doesn’t have this market cornered.

Zach Lowe of Grantland:

Boston has been calling around the league over the last week, reminding GMs that Philly isn’t the only team with salary space to rent out as we approach the February 19 trade deadline.

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Thanks to the Celtics own flurry of trades, they have several trade exceptions to absorb players:

  • $12,909,090 (Rajon Rondo)
  • $5,000,000 (Brandan Wright)
  • $2,439,840 (Austin Rivers)
  • $1,334,092 (Kris Humphries)
  • $625,280 (Jameer Nelson)
  • $507,336 (Dwight Powell)

Those exceptions can’t be combined, so they’re not quite as flexible as Philadelphia’s cap space. But there are enough of them in varied sizes that it probably won’t matter.

The 76ers have one big advantage over Boston: They’re probably still below the salary floor. Any shortfall is charged to the team and divided among its players, so Philadelphia has to spend that money anyway. Might as well spend it in a way that convinces another team to surrender a drat pick, no matter how low.

For the Celtics, the added salary would be a real cost. So, they’ll likely be more particular about accepting dead weight – especially as they near the luxury-tax line, which they’re about $12 million shy of.

But this could be a good way for Danny Ainge to add to his treasure trove of drat picks. The Celtics aren’t trying to win this season anyway, so accepting an overpaid player with a pick attached carries only as much downside as the length of the player’s contract and the real costs associated with it.

This competition between the 76ers and Celtics is good for the rest of the league. It should drive down the cost of dumping bad contracts.

Meanwhile, Philadelphia and Boston will continue to stock up for the future.

John Wall looks like All-Star, Knicks look like the Knicks, Wizards cruise to win

John Wall, Jose Calderon, Samuel Dalembert

For Wizards fans, early Christmas afternoon was a chance to bask in the warmth of John Wall’s improved game and have dreams of playoff wins dance in their heads.

For Knicks fans, it was pretty much a lump of coal.

In the first of a five-game slate on Christmas Day the Wizards raced out to a first quarter lead and put it in cruise control much of the afternoon, leading by double digits almost the entire game, as the Wizards basically embarrassed the Knicks winning 102-91.

Wall was the star for the Knicks — he had nine points and six assists in first quarter, leading the Wizards to put up 34-points in the first 12 minutes. That’s he most they have scored in the first quarter all season. The Wizards were up by 11 after the first quarter and never were threatened again.

Wall finished with 24 points, 11 assists and six rebounds and was just orchestrating the game. Plus he was doing things like this.

The real noise in the game came in the fourth quarter when Wall took a hard foul from Quincy Acy in transition — Wall bounced up and shoved Acy, something he admitted after the game he shouldn’t have done. Acy came back at him and basically tried to throw a punch — which he pulled, it didn’t land, but the damage was done. Acy was ejected and it he can expect to miss another game or two for the suspension that will come.

“Me being a key player I’ve got to keep my emotions in check and not get a technical or get ejected, that could have cost us the game,” Wall said in a televised interview on ESPN afterward. “I’ve just got to do a better job of staying composed.”

Washington showed it’s usual balanced attack with good ball movement — Bradley Beal had 17 points, Kris Humphries had 14 (and beat Amare Stoudemire off the dribble a couple times), Nene had 12, Rasual Butler 11. The Wizards got 50 of their points in the paint and basically did whatever they wanted on offense.

The Knicks slogged on offense, there was very little ball movement and that led to Carmelo Anthony getting 34 points, mostly from the perimeter and mostly contested — 21 of Anthony’s 28 shots were contested, he hit 11 of those.

The Knicks have lost 16-of-17 and it showed just how far this roster is from the top teams in the East (and the Wizards are a top team, a potential Eastern Conference Finals participant). They don’t defend, they don’t share the ball, they don’t play good team basketball, and Derek Fisher can’t seem to motivate the troops. The Knicks are just a mess.

But things will get better next year, Phil Jackson promises. For now, just use the lump of coal to keep warm.

Robin Lopez denies dating Khloe Kardashian “rumors” in hysterical way

Portland Trail Blazers v Indiana Pacers

After the experiences of Lamar Odom and Kris Humphries, you could totally understand why another NBA player would want to date one of the Kardashians. Those both ended so well for everyone.

Yet on Friday “news” came out Khloe Kardashian — for the uninitiated, she was the one with Lamar Odom who most recently was dating rapper French Montana — is single again and had her eyes on Portland center Robin Lopez. Because what woman doesn’t find that Sideshow Bob hair hot?

Lopez shot that down in a hysterical way on the Blazers’ official site (h/t Eye on Basketball):

“You know, I’m not exactly certain of the veracity of those rumors,” said Lopez. “But what I can comment on, I suppose, is the fabrication of that power couple by the press. Obviously they were looking for two people with a lot of influence on popular culture, on the youth, and they were looking for two movers and shakers. Frankly, I’m not surprised they came up with my name.”

And now that he’s sideline for at least the next six weeks, Lopez, a native of North Hollywood, said he’s willing to try out the glamorous, fast-paced lifestyle that surely goes hand in hand with dating a Kardashian.

“I’ve got a lot more free time for magazine shoots, guest hosting duties on TV shows and stuff,” said Lopez. “They can contact my agent if they want to. I’m also the associate video guy. That’s one of my new duties. Got a wealth of opportunities even though I’ve only got one hand right now.”

Now that’s the right attitude.

This is just not going to work out. Which may be best for Robin. I’m not sure the city of Portland would be the most welcoming place ever for the Kardashians. Slightly different sensibilities up there.