Tag: Kobe injured

Utah Jazz v Los Angeles Lakers

Kobe wants to try exotic German blood treatment on wrist


Kobe Bryant’s knee has not been the problem this season. Which is a nice change of pace. Apparently flying all the way to Germany to have an experimental blood treatment done on his knee seems well worth the expense now.

Just don’t ask about the wrist. We’re not talking about the wrist.

Wait… what about trying that exotic version of platelet-rich plasma therapy Kobe had done in Germany on the torn ligaments in his wrist? It worked on his knee, it was good enough for Alex Rodriguez, and all joints are pretty much the same thing, right?

Kobe wants to try it on his wrist, he told Rick Riley of ESPN.

One solution he’s working on is finding somebody to come to L.A. and give him the same Orthokine therapy on his wrist that worked so well on his knee this offseason in Germany.

“I’m looking into that right now,” he says.

Would he have to miss games? It’s Kobe, so probably not.

Sounds painful. But more painful than having an injection before every game? Probably not.

Kobe Bryant says he will play Sunday. You expected otherwise?

Clippers' Butler tries to strip the ball from Lakers shooting guard Bryant during NBA preseason basketball game in Los Angeles

Did anyone really expect a different answer?

Kobe Bryant downplayed his injury and told the media he would play on Sunday in the Lakers opener against the Chicago Bulls on Christmas Day. Here are his quotes via the Los Angeles Daily News.

“I should be fine,” he said….

“It just swelled up,” he said. “It got real big. In the morning, it felt a little better and I tried practicing and I couldn’t do much. It still got worse. That’s why I knew we had something else going on. I’ll just try to take care of it. It’s always been in my nature to try to figure out a way to play.

“The injuries I’ve had I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to play through. I haven’t had injuries where it could get worse. I’ve had tears of ligaments and they’re just not there anymore, so it’s not like it’s going to get any worse. So, if you can play through the pain, if you can catch a basketball, you should be fine.”

Kobe said he would wear a padded brace during the game.

The question was never really if Kobe would play but how much the injury would impact his game. He has a torn lunotriquetral ligament, which stabilizes smaller bones on the outside of the wrist. On his shooting hand. Which means it’s going to hurt every time he shoots.

This is not the 2002 Kobe that attacks and gets his shots at the rim — last season Kobe averaged 20 shots per game and 16.5 of them came outside of three feet. Kobe is a jump shooter now. If this injury makes him a less effective jump shooter it hurts the Lakers.

Kobe his right, he has played through worse and adapted. He will adapt again. But at some point all these injuries on his shooting hand are going to add up and be an issue.

Kobe Bryant has torn ligament in wrist, listed as day-to-day

Clippers' Butler tries to strip the ball from Lakers shooting guard Bryant during NBA preseason basketball game in Los Angeles

Another season, another injury in his shooting hand for Kobe Bryant to play through (and say it doesn’t bother him while his performance clearly shows otherwise).

Kobe will sit out Wednesday’s Lakers preseason game against the Clippers due to a torn lunotriquetral ligament in his right wrist, the team announced Wednesday afternoon. The injury occurred during a fall in the fourth quarter of the first Lakers preseason game against the Clippers and was discovered after an MRI. Kobe was seen grabbing his wrist late in the game but afterwards just shook it off as sore.

Officially, Kobe is listed as day-to-day. No word on if Kobe will be ready to go opening day against the Chicago Bulls, the team said it will depend both on the pain level and if Kobe can practice leading up to the game. But if you were going to bet against him going out there you should just drop that money in a Salvation Army bucket so at least it does some good.

Also remember that the Lakers start out the season with a back-to-back-to-back, so they will likely have to get Kobe and his wrist some rest in there somewhere.

The lunotriquetral ligament is not a large ligament, but provides stability to the small bones on the outside of the wrist. It can be a painful injury that takes weeks of immobility to heal properly, depending on the severity of the tear (we do not know that in this case). It does not require surgery.

Does anyone think Kobe is going to let it recover on its own timetable? No, Kobe will be out there as soon as he can and try to play through the pain. It’s what he does. But this will impact his game — last season Kobe took 16.5 shots from outside three feet per game (where he needed to use his wrist) and just 3.5 shots per game right at the rim. Kobe doesn’t attack and get the easy baskets at the rim anymore, he’s a jump shooter, so this injury could impact his shooting percentage going forward.

Look for this to linger — and add to the challenges the Lakers face at the start of the season.

Hornets’ coach explains Kobe’s ankle better than Kobe

New Orleans Hornets v Los Angeles Lakers - Game Five

Kobe Bryant wouldn’t really talk about his injured ankle, and he wasn’t letting doctors look at it either. All Phil Jackson would say was that he was playing.

After the game, it took Hornets coach Monty Williams to sum it up best (as reported by Sam Amick at Sports Illustrated):

“All this talk about his ankle — did it look like his ankle was hurting? OK then. It is what it is. He made a spectacular play.”

The spectacular play in question is his dunk over Ekemka Okafor. Although the one over Carl Landry was pretty good, too.

It would be very Kobe for the treatments to work, for his ankle to feel a lot better and for him to keep that quiet as his own little secret he would spring on the world during the game. Kobe loves him some mind games, some psychological warfare.

Maybe that’s why he and Phil Jackson get along.

NBA Playoffs: It’s not Kobe’s ankle, it’s Chris Paul breaking them

New Orleans Hornets v Los Angeles Lakers - Game Two
Leave a comment

Game 5 is about ankles.

The one getting all the hype is Lakers guard Kobe Bryant’s left ankle. His foot is still attached, so he’s playing. That’s not the question.

He twisted his ankle (and foot) at the end of Los Angeles 93-88 loss to New Orleans in Game 4 and has since refused to get an X-ray or an MRI.  That can be taken as a sign that his ankle is not that bad, or that he is stubborn. Take your pick. Maybe even some of both. But it could backfire.

If Kobe’s ankle isn’t right, his shot will be flat and he won’t be of much help defending Hornets point guard Chris Paul tonight in Game 5. And that could be trouble for the Lakers. Maybe.

The other ankles are the ones Paul keeps breaking.

He has torn up the Lakers defense this series, and in the Hornets’ two wins he has been absolutely dominant in the second half. His crossovers are breaking ankles and creating space, but more importantly they are forcing defensive rotations and then he is finding the open man.

Who is knocking it down? In the first half of Game 4, Trevor Ariza didn’t even need Paul’s help (he got plenty of isolations) and made plays. The Hornets will need more of that.

The Lakers were 2-2 in their first-round series against Oklahoma City last year, too, but found their footing in the next two games. History may well repeat itself.

That footing has less to do with Kobe’s ankle and more to do with the Lakers getting back to pounding the ball inside (then making those shots). Hornets center Emeka Okafor was able to keep Andrew Bynum — the real key for these Lakers this series — in check. Pau Gasol and Lamar Odom were off.

The Lakers need to get a lot of points in the paint, more importantly they need to own the boards. They are the bigger team, but they were outrebounded last game. Paul had as many as Odom and Gasol combined (13). What Pat Riley told the Showtime Lakers years ago remains true for these Lakers today: rebounds equal rings.

The Lakers need to make Paul work — they had success in Game 2 with ball denial — and they need to be physical with him. They are the bigger team; they need to wear him down. He is the Hornets’ chance. Even slow him to average and the Lakers can win. But when he breaks out, he is a perfect key to unlock the Lakers.

At this point, this series is not about adjustments. It’s about execution. Paul has been the master; the Lakers have been spotty. If the Lakers play like that again, their dreams of a three-peat will be in sudden and serious jeopardy. Because we know CP3 will bring it.