Tag: Kobe Bryant

Los Angeles Lakers' Bryant celebrates after his teammate Howard scored during their NBA basketball game against the Dallas Mavericks in Los Angeles

Lakers’ D’Angelo Russell sinks backwards half courter, celebrates with Kobe fist pump


Saturday was the rookie photo shoot, which mainly meant all the top draft picks from June were in one gym goofing off.

That includes the Lakers’ D’Angelo Russell, who knocked down a backwards half courter, then celebrated with a Kobe Bryant first pump. Unless Russell was doing an impression of Brandon Armstrong doing his Kobe impression — in which case he nailed it.

What I really want to see is Russell break that out during the season with Kobe on the court.

Hat tip to Silver Screen and Roll.

Report: Lakers-Clippers scheduled for Christmas


The Lakers have the NBA’s longest active streak of Christmas games, playing on Dec. 25 the last 16 years.

Pencil them in for 17.

Mike Bresnahan of the Los Angels Times:

This joins Warriors-Cavaliers and Heat-Pelicans as the reported Christmas games in the NBA’s tentative schedule. This is probably the least-attractive matchup on paper, though.

The Clippers have at least three players – Chris Paul, Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan – better than any Lakers. It’s possible, with the right breaks, J.J. Redick, Lance Stephenson and/or Paul Pierce could best any Laker, too.

Oops, I forgot Kobe Bryant is still arguably the NBA’s best player.

This is a regular-season game, and any team can win one of those. So, don’t be surprised if the Lakers win. This might be their biggest game of the season while the Clippers look forward to the playoffs.

But make no mistake: This is the Clippers’ game to lose, and they’re also playing for something – trying to carve into the Lakers’ massive fan base in Los Angeles.

Brandon Bass: Kobe Bryant is “arguably the best player in the game still”

Cleveland Cavaliers v Los Angeles Lakers

We know what Kobe Bryant still thinks of his skills. Last year, when ESPN ranked him the 40th best player in the NBA right now, because he was 36 years old and coming off an Achilles injury, he said they were idiots. Then Bryant missed more than half of last season due to injury (and Byron Scott wearing him down with heavy minutes early).

So where does Bryant rank now?

If you ask newest Laker Brandon Bass right at the top. Turns out the New Orleans Times-Picayune did ask Bass that question.

“…we have arguably the best player in the game still,” Bass said. “When he is healthy he is a monster still. If he is healthy he’s right up there with the best players in the league, that’s LeBron or whoever the best players in the league are. When Kobe is healthy, 19 years in the game he is still elite.”

What did you expect him to say?

But is Kobe still elite?

All-time, no doubt Kobe is elite. He will go down as one of the game’s all-time greats. He deserves the retired number in the rafters and the statue out in front of Staples — none other than Jerry West called Kobe the greatest Laker. He’s an intense, old-school competitor, a guy with amazing fundamentals and footwork, a high hoops IQ, and back in the day some impressive athleticism. He’s got five rings because few players in league history have gotten as much out of their natural gifts as Kobe. He will be missed when he walks away.

But right now?

To quote Seth and Amy, “Really?”

Last season Kobe wasn’t surrounded by much talent so — as he has done in the past — he took on an incredible load in the offense, putting it on his back. The results were inefficient and physically wore him down (his shooting percentages dropped the deeper into the season he got). Kobe can’t carry that kind the same way as he did a decade ago. He can’t get to the rim the same way (and defenses packed it in on the Lakers) which led to 55 percent of his shots coming from 16 feet or farther out, and those shots were not falling. Kobe shot just 29.3 percent from three last season and had a true shooting percentage of 47.7 percent, well below the league average. Kobe still can pass and play a smart game (if he trusts his teammates), he also still made some plays, and he was certainly above average (which should give Lakers fans hope as Kobe will have better talent around him this season).

But elite? As in LeBron James, Stephen Curry, James Harden, Kevin Durant kind of elite?

Sorry, but Bass is just spinning what his new team and its fans want to hear. Just like the idea the Lakers can make the playoffs.



Roy Hibbert opens up about mental health struggles, says Ron Artest inspired him

Kevin Love, Roy Hibbert

Roy Hibbert has had one of the more confusing NBA careers of the last decade. He’s been a two-time All-Star and for the first half of the 2013-14 season, looked like a legitimate Defensive Player of the Year candidate. But other times, he’s looked lost, especially on offense. His split from the Pacers was ugly — they all but begged him to opt out of his contract and he didn’t, so they traded him to the Lakers. It’s a fresh start for Hibbert, and he’s confident he’ll be able to play with Kobe Bryant.

Hibbert also opened up to ESPN.com’s Baxter Holmes about his struggles with mental health, revealing that he’s visited a sports psychologist in the past, inspired by Ron Artest, who famously thanked his psychiatrist after the Lakers’ 2010 title.

“I felt that when [Artest] did that, it kind of opened the doors to make it somewhat OK,” Hibbert says. “I think it was great that he actually did that.”

Mental health is a subject Hibbert doesn’t seem to enjoy discussing. His words come slowly, each carefully chosen. At times, it seems like there’s more he wants to say, but he doesn’t. He has his reasons, which he declines to share. But Hibbert is interested in the field. He says he first visited a psychologist when he boarded at Georgetown Prep, where he was one of the top high-school prospects in the nation.

“I was a black kid in an all-white school, so I had to deal with some of that stress and pressure,” Hibbert told ESPN.com in November 2014. “If I didn’t do that back in high school, I probably wouldn’t be open to it later on.”

He was also an only child, sheltered by two parents who each worked multiple jobs, and admittedly socially awkward, spending much of his time playing video games.

The visits helped Hibbert shed any fear of being labeled as “having a couple of screws loose,” a stubborn perception that persists in the world of sports, in which “mental strength” — however abstract the definition — is fetishized.

In a separate interview with Holmes, Artest (now Metta World Peace) says he’s encouraged by more high-profile NBA players seeking psychological help:

I think it’s cool because when you look at the state of basketball — like how I grew up — basketball was something that helped me relieve some stress. I had a lot of fun, but I brought a lot of my baggage onto the court with me to a place that I loved, which was the basketball court.

And everybody has different issues, good or bad, that they carry with them on the court. It affects you. And for me, it affected me to where sometimes I would be overly aggressive and, in other ways, it would affect people to where they can’t perform on the court. I was always able to perform, but sometimes I would act out and I wanted to see a sports psychologist. Because to me, I didn’t need a psychologist to get my mind right. I needed a psychologist to help me perfect what I love, and I can’t perfect it when I’m on the bench or when I’m getting suspended because I’m playing upset.

That’s why I really had to thank my psychologist, because without her, I would not have been as locked in. Because you’ve got to think about it — I was coming from Houston, where I was averaging 20 a night, and in Indiana. I was also going through depression because I wasn’t in the spotlight as much, because I had Kobe [Bryant], Pau [Gasol] and [Andrew] Bynum, then Lamar [Odom] and [Derek] Fisher and everything. So I wasn’t getting the touches that I was used to, also, so that was very frustrating to me.

However Hibbert fares in Los Angeles, it’s good to see professional athletes be more open about the mental side of the game, and how they can sometimes struggle to get out of their own heads. There has been tremendous progress made in the national conversation around mental health in the past decade, but the stigma of seeing a psychologist still isn’t completely gone, and the more Hibbert and World Peace speak out about it, the faster that will change.

Roy Hibbert says he’s up for the ‘challenge’ of playing with Kobe Bryant

Roy Hibbert, Kobe Bryant

Roy Hibbert’s mental fragility has been no secret.

Kobe Bryant torments his teammates, and two players – Jared Dudley and Jordan Hill – recently discussed how playing with Kobe isn’t for everybody.

Now, Hibbert and Kobe both play for the Lakers. How will that go?

Baxter Holmes of ESPN:

Hibbert has already witnessed Bryant’s brashness first-hand. The center broke his nose while fouling Bryant in an early 2012 game. Not long after, Hibbert said on a podcast that he talked to Bryant “expecting a little sympathy, and I got none from Kobe.”

But Hibbert says he and Bryant have since cleared the air, and that he’s “excited” to play alongside him.

“Just being able to play with a great [and] being pushed by somebody that has done it and won five championships. I’m up for a challenge,” Hibbert says. “People tell me a lot of different things, how he’ll respect me, and I feel like if I go about my business, I can get it done.”

“So,” Hibbert says before taking a long pause, “it’ll be a challenge. But I’m up for it. I’m not going to speculate on other people and how they interacted with him and their relationships, but I feel like if I put my best foot forward in practices and in games, I don’t feel like there will be any tension. And I’m the type of person that will be like, ‘Hey, if I did something, let’s talk it out,’ as opposed to just going back and forth every day.”

Kobe has gotten more patient with his teammates, but that doesn’t make him patient with his teammates.

Will Kobe take a different approach with Hibbert? Maybe. If Kobe wants to make the playoffs, the Lakers need major contributions from Hibbert. His rim protection alone could transform what had been a lousy defense.

But I have plenty of doubt this relationship will work.

I’m reminded of the scorpion-and-frog fable. A scorpion wants to cross a river, but he can’t swim. So, he asks a frog to carry him across the water. The frog says no, fearing the scorpion will sting him. The scorpion assures the frog that he wont, because if he did, they’d both drown during passage. The frog relents, and the scorpion hops on his back. As they reach the middle of the river, the scorpion stings the frog, who begins to sink. The frog asks the scorpion why he did that, knowing it will kill them both.

“I couldn’t help it,” the scorpion says. “It’s in my nature.”

For Hibbert and Kobe to mesh, at least one will have to change his nature. That’s far from impossible, but I wouldn’t bet on it.