Tag: Kings to Anaheim

David Stern

With Sacramento arena deal all but dead, Stern says league has done all it can


David Stern’s press conference Friday afternoon sounded a whole lot like a eulogy for the Kings in Sacramento.

Stern said Friday afternoon following the two-day NBA Board of Governor’s meeting that a handshake deal reached All-Star Weekend to get a new arena built in Sacramento was basically dead. While he would not use that exact word Stern sounded like a guy resigned to seeing a team move. Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson and the Maloof family that owns the Kings are reportedly meeting Friday but that is a Hail Mary at this point – George Maloof said there is no deal and Johnson said the city was done negotiating.

“We had an agreement in principle, a framework, a deal. Call whatever you want,” Stern said at the press conference broadcast on NBATV. “In my view, it was subject to any party who said didn’t want to do it. It was always non-binding… I think it’s fair for Maloofs to say ‘I don’t want to do it.’

“If they did it a little earlier, a little simpler and a little more directly, it could have saved some angst.”

Stern’s body language and tone suggested he felt bad for Mayor Johnson and the fans of Sacramento, who had stepped up. Stern said several times that the city had done all that could be asked of it.

“I am extremely disappointed, on behalf of Maloofs and city of Sacramento, but I think that there’s nothing further to be done,” Stern said. “This is a situation that the Maloofs will make judgments on and city will have to make judgments on. I think we’ve done as much as we can do.”

While the team has not yet filed for relocation — to Anaheim most likely, although there are other options — it would be surprising if that does not come soon. The Maloof family has said they wanted to stay in Sacramento but their actions said otherwise.

Stern said the league is scheduling the Kings games next season into the Power Balance Arena in Sacramento, but he could not speak to anything beyond that. But the way co-owner George Maloof burned bridges in Sacramento with his Friday press conference in New York it’s just hard to see them staying.

And, as owners, that is their right.

The NBA treats its owners like feudal Lords who can pretty much do what they want in their fiefdoms. David Stern works for and at the pleasure of the other owners. While he took a couple shots at the Maloofs press conference, Stern said repeatedly the Maloofs were within their rights to make the moves they did. As owners paying into an arena project, they had the right to raise concerns and back out.

The other owners, who might want to use that same “we might leave town” leverage down the line on their cities, are not about to tie the hands of the Maloofs.

And so a good NBA fan base in Sacramento is about to lose its team.

David Stern comments about Kings arena situation with typical coded message

team maloof with stern

David Stern took a moment to address the Kings arena situation in Utah before Wednesday’s game against the Suns. Brian Smith of the Salt Lake Tribune has been a great resource for the Kings arena information and he brought this quote to print:

Stern on how he feels about the Kings staying in Sacramento, compared to when a tentative deal was reached during All-Star weekend:

You know, I’m more hopeful than I am confident right now. I’m hopeful because the city of Sacramento has between last meeting and this, has been responsible for responding on a sponsorship basis, on a ticket basis and on allocating $250 million or so for a new arena. In basically a week — what’s today? Wednesday — in a week, our owners will be coming in for meetings next Thursday and next Friday, and we’ll be having the Maloofs in to talk with some group of them and we’ll see where it’s going. Very, very hopeful that it gets on track, because the owners have a respect for the Maloofs. And I think the owners also have an enormous respect for what Sacramento has done over the years in supporting an NBA franchise. And it’s always been our first preference — particularly when government agencies or states are helpful — to keep a team where a team is if they’re playing in a good facility.

Despite Stern’s downgrade from ‘confident’ to ‘hopeful,’ this should come across as pretty good news to Kings fans. The city has hit all of the marks on Stern’s list, and by making remarks about how the owners respect the Maloofs – he’s making the not-so-subtle implication that he expects them to continue earning that respect.

As I wrote earlier today, all eyes will be on the Board of Governors meetings on April 12-13 when the NBA is expected to decide what to do about the Maloofs’ recent refusal to pay arena pre-development costs.

Sacramento City Council takes unanimous step toward key arena vote

kings purple

One vote down to bring a new arena to Sacramento, one more critical vote to go.

Tuesday, the Sacramento City Council voted unanimously to continue finalizing proposals with private parking companies, who will in turn provide $200 million or more toward a new Entertainment and Sports Complex. For that money, the winning bidder will have the right to operate the city-owned parking assets for up to 50 years. This is a critical piece of mayor Kevin Johnson’s plan to keep the Kings in Sacramento, and a ‘no’ vote last night would have sent the team packing, though as I reported earlier Tuesday it wasn’t going to come to that.

That report also included a breakdown of the situation and news that the council will have the votes to approve an arena deal before the March 1 deadline, so long as a laundry list of achievable criteria is met.

That criteria, including safeguards on the parking deal and project cost overruns, is going to be worked out over the next two weeks as the city, the private parties, the NBA, and the Maloofs will come together to create a term sheet for the council to vote on. The vote is expected to be held on February 28, but it’s possible, even likely, that the NBA will allow for an extension on their deadline so they can review the terms at a reasonable pace. That announcement could come on All Star weekend.

Tuesday’s vote wasn’t expected to be contentious, but hundreds of Kings fans still showed up to make their case to the council. They wore white T-shirts with words such as growth, economic engine, events, downtown, nightlife, etc, and did their best not to recreate the acoustics in Power Balance Pavilion.

While there were eight speakers signed up make the opposition’s case, mayor Johnson was forced to limit public comment in support of the arena due to obvious time constraints.

After about 20 arena proponents were allowed to address the council, Johnson asked those in support of the arena that didn’t get a chance to speak to stand up and be recognized. Nearly everybody in the double-decker room stood up.

For well over five years Sacramento has been seen as impotent in its ability to get an arena deal done, but even council members that are in opposition of the current deal seemed resigned to their fate. Sandy Sheedy, the most vocal opponent of the deal, put up little to no fight on the issue and the other opponents chose not to speak. Surely they could be saving their breath for when the games count, but in doing so they lost a critical chance to curry favor with the anti-arena crowd, if it even exists.

The vote in 2006 to implement a sales tax for a new Kings arena lost by an 80-to-20 margin, but what most people don’t know is that it was an extremely flawed and eventually abandoned measure that never had a chance.

Tuesday night a strong message was sent to the NBA and competing cities that an arena deal is coming.  Staring into the sea of white T-shirts, with little to no opposition to be found, it was hard to understand how it took them so long in the first place.