Tag: Kevin Love

Jerry West

Report: Jerry West threatened to resign if Warriors traded Klay Thompson for Kevin Love


Last summer, the Golden State Warriors were in the mix to get Kevin Love out of Minnesota, but Flip Saunders would not back off his asking price — Klay Thompson. A lot of people (myself admittedly included) thought they should pull the trigger.

They didn’t. It was the right move.

Thompson blossomed this season under Steve Kerr, who gave him added responsibilities. Meanwhile the Warriors found the versatile four they needed in Draymond Green.

Who was maybe the most vocal about keeping their shooting guard? Arguably the best shooting guard of all time — Jerry West. The part owner and consultant to the team was ready to walk if ownership pulled the trigger on the deal, reports Chris Ballard in a brilliant piece for Sports Illustrated (his work is almost always must read).

Perhaps West’s biggest contribution came last summer, though, when, along with Kerr, he adamantly opposed a trade centered around Thompson and Love. West argued that trading Thompson would be an enormous mistake. The Warriors were built on defense and Love, while a skilled offensive player, was a subpar defender. What’s more, West was certain Thompson would continue to improve, giving the Warriors a potential Hall of Fame backcourt for the next decade.

West felt so strongly that, according to one person close to the negotiations, he threatened to resign if the team made the trade. Chances are, West wouldn’t have actually done it—that’s just the way he talks—but when the most successful talent evaluator in league history feels that adamantly about something, it’s probably worth listening.

West tends to feel strongly about everything. And he’s right far more often than he’s wrong.

As it is with Steve Kerr and his coaching staff and players, the Warriors front office moves are a collaborative effort. It is not a top-down dictatorship. GM Bob Meyers, Kerr, owner Joe Lacob, West and a couple of assistant GMs (including Lacob’s son Kirk) all collaborate on team decisions. There are debates and disagreements, things are hashed out and a decision reached.

That doesn’t mean there is always a consensus, and there wasn’t on trading for West. But as a group they reached their decision. Thompson stayed.

And now the Warriors are within one win of an NBA title because of it. In part, because of West.



2015 NBA Finals: No bigs allowed

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five

As David Blatt fought off questions about his use of 7-foot-1 center Timofey Mozgov, Steve Kerr put it succinctly:

“It’s not a series for bigs.”

The Warriors and Cavaliers have combined to give players 6-foot-9 and taller just 12% of the minutes in the 2015 NBA Finals. That’s the lowest mark in the last 44 Finals and second-lowest for years Basketball-Reference.com has minutes data for the Finals (1955, 1957-2015):


And it’s not just one team dragging down the average.

This is the first NBA Finals in the sample where both teams are under 19%. The Cavaliers are at 11% and the Warriors 13%:


Game 5 took small ball to another level.

Mozgov played just nine minutes for the Cavaliers. Kendrick Perkins (6-foot-10) and Brendan Haywood (7-foot) didn’t get off the bench, and of course, neither did the injured Kevin Love (6-foot-10) and Anderson Varejao (6-foot-10).

The Warriors didn’t go big much more often. David Lee (6-foot-9) played nine minutes as a reserve, and Festus Ezeli (6-foot-11) got three. After starting every playoff game and nearly all his regular-season games to this point, Andrew Bogut (7-foot) didn’t play at all. James Michael McAdoo (6-foot-9) and Ognjen Kuzmic (7-foot) got their usual DNPs.

Single-game minutes data in the Finals goes back to only 1982 (though Game 1 in 1984 is missing). But that’s still a 34-year span.

In Game 5, Cleveland and Golden State posted the No. 1 and No. 2 lowest percentage of minutes given to players 6-foot-9 and taller. In fact, the 2015 Finals has produced the seven lowest scores in the sample:


Going small is a weapon Golden State and Cleveland have deployed this season. They’re both comfortable playing this way.

The Warriors kicked up a notch by starting Game 4 small, and the Cavaliers responded in Game 5 by going small more often. It resulted in a loss, but Blatt sounds as if he might stick with the strategy.

Will anything stop this arms race toward tininess?

LeBron James’ teammates hit playoff low in scoring

LeBron James, Tristan Thompson

LeBron James didn’t mince words.

“I feel confident because I’m the best player in the world,” LeBron said. “It’s simple.”

If only it were that simple for him.

LeBron scored 40 points (to go with 14 rebounds and 11 assists), but Cleveland lost Game 5 of the Finals, 104-91, Sunday. Why? The other Cavaliers scored just 51 points.

That’s a low for LeBron’s teammates this postseason:


The last time his teammates scored so few was March 26, 2014. LeBron scored 38 in an 84-83 loss to the Pacers.

Before that it was Game 6 of the 2013 Eastern Conference finals. Again against Indiana, LeBron scored 29 in a 91-77 loss.

This is the 39th time LeBron’s teammates have scored so few points, including 12th in the playoffs. His record in those games: 5-34 overall, 2-10 in the playoffs

Why aren’t his teammates scoring more now? Here are the thee biggest reasons in order:

1. Kevin Love’s and Kyrie Irving’s injuries

They were the Cavaliers’ second and third options, and they’re sidelined. If those two were healthy, Cleveland’s scoring would be much more balanced. As is, LeBron has taken it upon himself to do practically everything.

2. Warriors’  defense

Golden State has spent a lot of time defending LeBron straight up, not helping off Cleveland’s shooters while still forcing LeBron into enough misses. When the Warriors have double-teamed, they’ve been very deliberate about when and how to do it. Essentially, they’re daring LeBron to beat them singlehandedly and not letting anyone else get going.

3. Remaining Cavaliers playing poorly

Tristan Thompson, J.R. Smith, Iman Shumpert and Matthew Dellavedova are over their heads as No. 2 or even No. 3 options. It’s no surprise this group can’t put the ball in the basket enough. LeBron shot 15-of-34 (44%) Sunday, and his teammates were 17-of-47 (36%).

No. 1 isn’t changing. I suppose No. 2 could, but Golden State has been the NBA’s best defensive team all season. For the Cavaliers to win again this season, No. 3 will have to change.

Will LeBron’s teammates score more, enough to beat the Warriors?

Finding confidence there definitely isn’t so simple.