Tag: Kevin Love

Tristan Thompson gives Timofey Mozgov bloody nose while dunking on him pregame (video)


The Cavaliers already have Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving sidelined. They certainly don’t need their starting power forward taking out their starting center.

But Mozgov apparently recovered just fine, scoring nine points, grabbing five rebounds and blocking two shots in 22 minutes in Game 3.

Add this to the legend of Mozgov.

LeBron James posts triple-double, Al Horford ejected as Cavaliers take 3-0 series lead with OT Game 3 win over Hawks


Once Kyle Korver was ruled out for the remainder of the postseason, the prospect of the Hawks winning even a single game against the Cavaliers seemed highly improbable.

Once Al Horford was ejected in the second quarter of Game 3, that task became essentially impossible.

Atlanta battled throughout, and forced an overtime session. But in the end, Cleveland got the 114-111 victory, and took a 3-0 series lead that has the Cavaliers one game away from the NBA Finals.

It certainly wasn’t easy.

LeBron James opened the game by missing his first 10 shots — the first time in his career, regular season or playoffs, that it’s ever happened. He found other ways to impact the game, however, setting up his teammates with on-point passes, or crashing the boards when shots were missed.

James was laboring overall, and may have been dealing with the effects of a season’s worth of minor bumps and bruises beginning to take their toll. He finished with his 12th career playoff triple-double — 37 points, 18 rebounds, and 13 assists, while launching a career-high 37 shots.

The Hawks were in this one for most of the contest, and even seemed to have control of it at times. That changed for a stretch late in the second quarter, though, when Horford was ejected for appearing to throw an elbow at Matthew Dellavedova after the two had gotten tangled up, and Dellavedova had already fallen to the floor.

This play was reminiscent of the one that involved Dellavedova and Taj Gibson in the previous round of the playoffs that saw Gibson get ejected. The final action by both Gibson and Horford may or may not have been worthy of the flagrant-two all by itself, but when looking at the plays in their entirety, a case could certainly be made.

With Horford, he had Dellavedova with a Kelly Olynyk arm-lock that caused the two to fall to the floor in the first place. Dellavedova fell awkwardly into Horford’s leg, the same way he did in (inadvertently) taking Korver out for the remainder of the playoffs. Horford obviously felt it was intentional, and retaliated. But Dellavedova may have flashed back to Kevin Love’s season-ending injury when Horford had a hold of him, and could have felt justified in attempting to inflict some damage. Either way, the call by the officials — while harsh, controversial and appearing initially to be the final nail in Atlanta’s coffin — seemed to be correct.

The Cavaliers led by as many as 10 points in the fourth, but couldn’t put the Hawks away. Atlanta played with a level of desperation that Cleveland couldn’t match, and had a chance to win it at the end of regulation. But hero-ball in isolation is not this Hawks team’s strength, and Jeff Teague dribbling down most of the final 17 seconds remaining before launching (and missing) a tough three-pointer at the buzzer wasn’t the best use of Atlanta’s resources.

In the overtime session, the difference was James.

LeBron scored his team’s last five points, hitting a corner three with 36 seconds left to give his team the lead for good, before sealing the victory with a driving bank shot going to his left to give the Cavaliers a three-point lead which would remain in place when the final buzzer sounded.

It was an incredible effort by the shorthanded Hawks. But this game will ultimately be remembered for the brilliance of LeBron James, and the way he was able to overcome a career-worst start to finish with an historic effort that put his team one win away from a trip to the NBA Finals.

Mitch Kupchak: Lakers “don’t have time” to build through the draft

Mitch Kupchak

In a little over a month, the Lakers will be selecting second overall in the NBA Draft. The player they take, whether it be Jahlil Okafor, Karl-Anthony Towns, D’Angelo Russell or someone else, is someone they will hope to be the post-Kobe Bryant face of the franchise. Beyond that, though, the word is that the Lakers are done trying to slowly acquire talent.

Here’s what GM Mitch Kupchak told Bleacher Report Radio on Sunday about the team’s mindset following two straight years missing the playoffs:

The Lakers are going to have max-level cap space this summer, which they’ll use to chase a top-tier free agent, whether that be Rajon Rondo, Kevin Love or LaMarcus Aldridge. This has been their strategy for the last year: they went hard after Carmelo Anthony last summer and attempted to reach out to LeBron James and Chris Bosh during free agency, although they didn’t get far with either one.

With the Kobe Bryant era drawing to a close (Kupckak reiterated in the same interview that the Lakers are proceeding as though 2015-16 would be Bryant’s final year), the Lakers don’t have a clear direction going forward. They’ll get Julius Randle back from the leg injury that kept him out all but one game of his rookie season, and paired with whoever they take in next month’s draft, that’s a solid young foundation.

But that won’t be enough to win in the crowded Western Conference, at least not for a while. They’ll need to add talent to put around them, and the quickest way to do that is through free agency. After missing the playoffs two years in a row, the historically dominant Lakers are anxious to get back to being relevant.

The Lakers’ hands are also sort of tied when it comes to building through the draft. They still owe next year’s pick to the Sixers, unless it falls in the top three. Even if they wanted to build through the draft, they don’t have any more first-round picks after this year until 2017.

With that said, Kupchak’s “don’t have time” wording is questionable. If it were any other franchise than the Lakers or the Knicks, it would be assumed that the road to contention would take several years of developing talent. But the Lakers pride themselves on being a consistently championship-level organization, and missing the playoffs two years in a row has been tough on them, so their mentality is not going to change.

And if the Lakers get a star free agent, that’s great. But if they don’t, they could be in for another several years of disappointment relative to expectations.

Kyrie Irving misses shootaround, questionable for Game 2

Cleveland Cavaliers v Atlanta Hawks - Game One

Kyrie Irving said he planned to play Game 2.

He also said, “I just don’t have it right now.”

It seems the latter of those two semi-conflicting thoughts is winning out.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

The Cavaliers don’t need Irving to be at full strength to beat the Hawks. See Game 1.

But they might need Irving to eat some minutes at point guard, where Matthew Dellavedova is the only other player on the roster. Sure, LeBron James takes a lot of responsibility as the lead ball-handler, but it helps to have a natural point guard on the floor at times.

If Irving’s injury keeps him sideline tonight and/or beyond, that’s a big blow for Cleveland, which is already without Kevin Love.

Stephen Curry, LeBron James unanimous choices, lead All-NBA First Team

Stephen Curry

This is bigger than the All-Star Game for a lot of players. Because it’s more exclusive.

Only six guards, six forwards and three centers get to make the All-NBA team, it is the cream that has risen to the top of the NBA.

No shock, LeBron James and freshly-minted MVP Stephen Curry were unanimous choices to make the first team — if you put together a ballot and they’re not on it you’re doing it wrong. This is also the first First Team vote for Anthony Davis, who earned this spot based on his historic season and carrying the Pelicans to the playoffs.

No Hawks made the list — the team ball concepts can hurt come time for individual awards. Fair or not.

Here is the full list. The two forwards are listed first, followed by the center, then the two guards. After the players team is the number of first team votes (in parenthesis) and total points.


LeBron James, Cleveland (129) 645
Anthony Davis, New Orleans (119) 625
Marc Gasol, Memphis (65) 453
Stephen Curry, Golden State (129) 645
James Harden, Houston (125) 637


LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland (13) 390
DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento (18) 220
Pau Gasol, Chicago (15) 242
Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City (10) 397
Chris Paul, L.A. Clippers (1) 335


Blake Griffin, L.A. Clippers (2) 189
Tim Duncan, San Antonio (6) 167
DeAndre Jordan, L.A. Clippers (12) 175
Klay Thompson, Golden State 122
Kyrie Irving, Cleveland 112

Other players receiving votes, with point totals (First Team votes in parentheses): Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio, 155; Paul Millsap, Atlanta, 70; Al Horford, Atlanta, 64 (1); John Wall, Washington, 50; Jimmy Butler, Chicago, 32; Damian Lillard, Portland, 22; Draymond Green, Golden State, 9; Zach Randolph, Memphis, 7; Jeff Teague, Atlanta, 7; Andrew Bogut, Golden State, 6; Nikola Vucevic, Orlando, 6; DeMar DeRozan, Toronto, 3; Rudy Gay, Sacramento, 3; Andre Drummond, Detroit, 2; Gordon Hayward, Utah, 2; Kyle Korver, Atlanta, 2; Joakim Noah, Chicago, 2; Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas, 2; Dwyane Wade, Miami, 2; Carmelo Anthony, New York, 1; Tyson Chandler, Dallas, 1; Mike Conley, Memphis, 1; Brook Lopez, Brooklyn, 1; Kevin Love, Cleveland, 1; Kyle Lowry, Toronto, 1; Khris Middleton, Milwaukee, 1.