Tag: Kevin Garnett

Kevin Garnett responds to Raptors’ complaints about officiating: ‘In the playoffs you’re not going to get calls’


There was plenty of whining coming out of Toronto following the Raptors’ Game 1 loss to the Nets, and much of it centered around the officiating.

The Raptors are new to the postseason, and so are their fans, having not experienced playoff basketball in six years, and having only seen what it’s like to get out of the first round once in the team’s 19-year history.

Blaming the officials for a loss is the worst kind of fandom, reserved for the uneducated and narcissistic who feel the world is out to get their favorite team. Kevin Garnett was more subtle in responding to the chatter, and essentially said that it’s foolish for any team to expect to get the calls in a postseason series.

From James Herbert at ESPN.com:

Toronto Raptors coach Dwane Casey found the lack of calls his team received in the fourth quarter of its Game 1 playoff matchup “unusual,” but Brooklyn Nets big man Kevin Garnett is willing to chalk it up to postseason basketball.

“In the playoffs you’re not going to get calls,” Garnett said. “If you do, then you’re fortunate. Playing on the road is very difficult. We know that. Some of us do. And that’s just expected to come with the series. Things are not going to go the way that you want them and you have to just continue to be aggressive. But that’s the difference between experience and non-experience.” …

“I’m not going to comment on officiating, except to say I went back to watch the calls in the fourth quarter and we didn’t get any,” Casey said on Monday. “And that’s unusual.”

It’s Casey’s job to lobby the officials, but nonsense like this, which claims small market discrimination, conspiracy and lack of respect, is bad for the game and only serves to further fuel the fans’ collective ignorance.

Toronto lost Game 1 for basketball reasons (shoutout to David Stern), most of which are intelligently chronicled here. If the Toronto players are truly going to be focused more on the officiating than on making the necessary adjustments, then this playoff series, like all but one in the Raptors’ franchise history, has already been lost.

Nets defense smothers Raptors, gets Brooklyn Game 1 win on road

Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry (7) battles under the hoop with Brooklyn Nets centre Kevin Garnett (2) but they couldn't get it done as the Nets won 94-87

The game slows down in the playoffs, to win you have to execute in the half court.

Brooklyn’s halfcourt defense doubled and smothered Toronto’s Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, it took away passing lanes, and with that the Raptors halfcourt offense became a stagnant swamp. Toronto shot 39.4 percent as a team and had an offensive rating of just 93.5 points per 100 possessions in their first playoff game in years.

The Nets, on the other hand, played like veterans who comfortably moved the ball, found the open man, attacked mismatches, and hit the key shots late — particularly Paul Pierce, who struggled for three quarters and had 9 points when it mattered in the fourth.

With that the Nets picked up a 94-87 win in Game 1.

That puts the Nets up 1-0 with a well-earned road win — they are now in command of this series. When road teams wins the first playoff game in a series they go on to win the series 56 percent of the time. More than that, the Nets shot 4-of-24 from three, (16.7 percent) when on the season they shot 36.9 percent from deep.

Which is to say, this game was a lot closer than it probably should have been. The Nets were clearly the better team Saturday.

Toronto came out fired up — their GM was feeding that crowd before the game — and fed Jonas Valanciunas early, trying to make the Nets pay for their small ball lineup (he finished with 17 points on 13 shots, plus 18 rebounds). It worked, and the Raptors were up 11-7.

Then the Nets went on a 12-0 run doing what they did all game. On offense they went after the mismatches — Joe Johnson was covered John Salmons early and the Nets went at it. Johnson had 8 of his 24 in the first quarter, for the game he hit 8-of-13 shooting.

Deron Williams also had 24 points, on 8-of-20 shooting. The Nets offense wasn’t brilliant in this game, but it was good enough because of their defense.

The Toronto starting five, in the 13 minutes on the court together, shot just 23.5 percent. More than that, the Raptors turned the ball over on 20.4 percent of their possessions in the game (17 total).

Brooklyn has a long defensive team that is smart about passing lanes and recovery, and Toronto kept playing into their hands with attacks that were in isolation in the half court, or just a drive off the pick, and each time Lowry and DeRozan found themselves doubled and without good options. Lowry was 7-of-18, DeRozan 3-of-13 on the night.

Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett also struggled early, but with the game on the one late both had key buckets — PP had nine points in the fourth going at a mismatch.

Toronto got points when they ran off a miss or turnover and attack, expect them to try and do more of that in Game 2. But they are going to have to find some better ball movement and way to create buckets in the half court.

Or this return to the playoffs that has energized Toronto will not last long.

NBA Playoff Preview: Brooklyn Nets vs. Toronto Raptors

Brooklyn Nets v Toronto Raptors


Brooklyn Nets: 44-38 (6 seed)

Toronto Raptors: 48-34 (3 seed)



OFFENSE/DEFENSE RANKINGS (points per 100 possessions)

Brooklyn Nets: Offense 104.4 (14th in the NBA), Defense 104.9 (19th in the NBA)

Toronto Raptors: Offense 105.8 (9th in the NBA), Defense 102.4 (9th in the NBA)


1. The Deron Williams – Kyle Lowry matchup: Kyle Lowry has been a key contributor in the Raptors’ return to the postseason for the first time since 2008, and he may be the best individual player in the series. Deron Williams, meanwhile, has had an inconsistent season in part due to injuries, and in part due to not being needed to carry the load nightly on a veteran Nets team. Williams will need to help slow Lowry defensively and keep pace in running his team from a numbers standpoint. At the very least, Brooklyn’s team defense needs to contain Lowry and prevent him from taking over at times the way he’s proven capable of doing throughout the regular season.

2. Experience vs. Exuberance: The Nets have a veteran roster built for the postseason, with players like Williams, Joe Johnson, Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett who have been there many times before. Toronto, meanwhile, has three starters who have never tasted the postseason. Jason Kidd has been there as a player, but has never had to make the adjustments necessary that a seven-game series requires from a head coach, while Dwane Casey has postseason experience coaching as an assistant, most recently on the 2011 Mavericks squad that won the title.

3. The best of the best: This may be one of the more competitive first round matchups, regardless of conference. The Raptors have the best record in the East since trading Rudy Gay in December, while the Nets have the best record in the conference since Jan. 1. The teams split the regular season series at two games apiece. This is a matchup between two teams who got used to winning essentially the entire second half of the season, and neither one is going to be an easy out.


The postseason is where the Nets having that huge payroll will pay dividends. They have three guys that can take the game over offensively on any given night in Johnson, Williams and Pierce, and developed role players throughout the season that can provide what’s needed on both ends of the floor to simply get the job done. It won’t be easy, but this series will prepare Brooklyn for the challenge that awaits in the later rounds, and the Nets’ experience will end up being the difference.

Nets in 6.

PBT Extra: Nets/Raptors playoff preview

Kyle Lowry, Kevin Garnett, Deron Williams

This is going to be one of the best series of the first round — a lot of fans have not seen Toronto much this season but if the Nets really did tank to get them they didn’t make things easy on themselves.

Julie Dondaldson and I discuss this first round matchup in the East, where the Nets will count on the expereience of Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce against the athleticism of Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan. It’s a great matchup. Joe Johnson torched the Raptors this season, DeRozan returned the favor.

This one could well go seven.

Could Nets rest guys hoping to face Raptors instead of Bulls in first round? (They didn’t)

Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Shaun Livingston, Deron Williams

Would you rather your team face the Toronto Raptors or the Chicago Bulls in the first round of the NBA playoffs?

It is possible the Brooklyn Nets front office is saying Toronto, at least according to Brian Windhorst of ESPN.

The Nets are sitting Mirza Teletovic, Alan Anderson and Shaun Livingston for sure Tuesday against the Knicks. Paul Pierce, Joe Johnson and Deron Williams are all game time decisions.

A lot of playoff bound teams rest guys this time of year, you say. That’s true. But maybe there’s more to this one.

UPDATE 8:33 pm: The Nets decided not to go this way. Paul Pierce, Deron Williams, Kevin Garnett and Joe Johnson all started.

If the Nets do fall to the six seed they are going to have to lose to the Knicks (playing without Carmelo Anthony) the old fashioned way.

3:46 pm: Follow along here as we travel down the road of the hypothetical with the currently fifth-seed Nets. If the Nets lose to the Knicks (a team likely without Carmelo Anthony) on Tuesday night then fall to the Cavaliers Wednesday night they will finish with 44 wins. Washington, the current six seed, has 43 wins but will be motivated to beat the Celtics Wednesday night because Charlotte, the seven seed, has 42 wins and the tiebreaker over Washington. The last thing the Wizards want is to fall to seven and get Miami in the first round.

But Washington has the tiebreaker over Brooklyn, so if they both finish with 44 wins the Wizards are the five seed, the Nets the six seed.

Assuming as expected Toronto beats the ‘Melo-less Knicks on Wednesday they are the three seed, the Bulls would be fourth (if the Raptors lose and the Bulls beat a motivated Charlotte team then Chicago is the three seed).

Got all that?

Bottom line is it is likely the Raptors are your three seed in the East, Bulls the four seed. Are the Nets looking at that, looking at the schedule and trying to line themselves up with the Raptors in the first round?

Not sure you could ever prove that, but something to watch.

And it would be a mistake for the Nets to think the Raptors — with a good defense, Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan — will be an easy out.