Tag: Kevin Durant

Miami Heat v Oklahoma City Thunder

Kevin Durant says don’t believe thousands of rumors to come about his free agency plans


Kevin Durant is the franchise changing, super-elite free agent next summer that every team is dreaming about.

While logic would tell you Oklahoma City remains the clear frontrunner, fans and executives dreams of free agency are not based in logic. Teams are planning just in case; fans are daydreaming and trying to talk themselves into why Durant wants to be a Wizard/Knick/Laker/Sun/whatever.

Which means there will be roughly 82,429 rumors between now and next July about what Kevin Durant wants to do as a free agent. Kevin Durant wants you to believe none of them, something he told Ken Berger of CBSSports.com.

Along with Matty Ice [Thunder PR man Matt Tumbleson], I’ve got two people that I trust with my life, my agent and my manager, who’s my best friend as well. I trust them with my life. So if you hear sources or anything, don’t believe it if it didn’t come from them. I tell them everything. We bounce ideas off each other. We collaborate on a lot of different things. They give me advice. so throughout this year, if you hear sources from anybody, it’s not true, unless you hear it from Charlie Bell, Rich Kleiman or Kevin Durant.

Of course, this will be about as effective as the Zune.

Other executives will talk, other agents will talk, and these conversations will become reports that will spread around the league. Durant will try to ignore them and stay focused on winning with a finally healthy Thunder roster. Certainly, how this season plays out will impact both his ultimate decision and the rumors.

Bottom line: Kevin Durant doesn’t know what Kevin Durant is going to do next summer. He knows how he is leaning, he knows what his priorities will be (after money, he’s a max everywhere although the Thunder can offer another year and larger raises), he knows the guys he wants to play with and the ones he doesn’t. But he can’t predict how things will look next July, an NBA season can feel like a lifetime.

So take the rumors with plenty of salt. But know they are coming in waves.

Stephen Curry: Real goal for Warriors is multiple rings

2015 NBA Finals - Game Six

SAN FRANCISCO — It’s been a non-stop summer in the Curry household.

Stephen Curry played basketball deeper into the summer than he ever has before, to the middle of June. Right after that his second daughter was born, complete with the late-night crying and round-the-clock effort needed nurturing a new life. He was in Las Vegas for Team USA mini-camp, then showed up to win a surfboard at the Nickelodeon Teen Choice Awards. His summer has been filled with increased demands on his time, from sponsor events to golfing with president Barack Obama.

Has he actually gotten any downtime to rest this summer?

“A little bit,” Curry said Wednesday to NBC Sports, in an event with Degree antiperspirants (which involved deeply in motion analysis and the study of human movement movement, such as Curry golfing) at the TPC Harding Park Golf Club outside San Francisco. “We’ve been moving around a lot this year, from place to place. Obviously there’s a lot of opportunity to celebrate what a great season it was, and obviously the new addition to our family. A lot has changed.

“But in the offseason I get out and play a little bit of golf, I stay moving that way, and then obviously you have to prepare for next season too and I’m already in that mindset. So it’s been a pretty crazy summer celebrating good things, great things, but there’s also been a good amount of time to reflect on how special it was.”

After the Spurs won their most recent title, coach Gregg Popovich was concerned about a drop-off in focus — he said it’s human nature to take a deep breath after winning a title, and that can be a setback the next season.

Curry is not worried about the Warriors keeping their edge.

“That’s going to be easy,” Curry said of the Warriors not taking that breath. “We’re all competitors, we’re all proud of what we did last season, but once you enter a new year, we’ll get our rings on opening night, and that’s the end of the celebrating of what happened and you look forward to the next journey, the next goal, which is to win another one.

“I’m hopefully going to lead that charge, and we have such a great core of guys that are young and hungry and want to relive that intoxicating feeling of winning a championship. You look at the history of the league, you understand how hard it is to win one, but the challenge of winning multiple is something that I’m happy to be gunning for now, that I’ve got one under my belt. But that’s the mission.”

The Warriors got that first title with a modern-NBA style offense that perfectly suits Curry — up tempo, a lot of three-point shots (Curry set the single-season record for makes from three), and going small with versatile players who can defend well plus create challenging matchups. Golden State’s offense is a counter to the Tom Thibodeau-style defenses that were the norm in the NBA, which itself was a counter to shut down isolation basketball teams. The end result is Golden State (and the Spurs, Hawks and a few others) play a fun-to-watch style with ball movement and fearless shooters on offense — fans loved it and watched the Finals at the highest levels since the Jordan era.

The Warriors are not changing what works.

“Who we are is who we are, we’ve just got to be better at it, more consistent at it,” Curry said.

But do they recognize what they are doing helping change the NBA, taking what Mike D’Antoni started in Phoenix with Steve Nash and evolving it into a system that can win a ring?

“It’s playing good basketball but it’s playing our way and not really getting caught up in defining it,” Curry said. “We have our strengths with our team and versatility is what we rely on — guys playing multiple positions — and just being gamers and competitors. We obviously shoot a lot of jumpers and we play fast, but we also play defense at a high level and that’s why we’re world champs right now. We’ve just got to embrace that style of play and be more consistent and be better at it — we’re going to get everybody’s best shot this year, even more than we did last year, but we’ll be ready for it.”

They will get that shot from some loaded teams — the Spurs added LaMarcus Aldridge, the Clippers added depth, the Rockets added Ty Lawson, and the Thunder will (hopefully) have a healthy Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. The top of the West is a gauntlet.

But the Warriors have the rings — they are the team to beat. And Curry is ready to defend it.

NBA rookie survey suggests Karl-Anthony Towns over Jahlil Okafor was a mistake

2015 NBA Draft

Most NBA teams would have picked Karl-Anthony Towns over Jahlil Okafor with the No. 1 pick in the 2015 NBA draft. I would have. The Timberwolves did.

But a plurality of NBA rookies prefer Okafor, who went No. 3 to the 76ers.

Two responses in NBA.com’s annual rookie survey reveal that:

Who will be the 2015-16 Rookie of the Year?

1. Jahlil Okafor, Philadelphia — 41.9 percent

2. Stanley Johnson, Detroit — 19.4 percent

3. Karl-Anthony Towns, Minnesota — 12.9 percent

T-4. Emmanuel Mudiay, Denver — 9.7 percent

D’Angelo Russell, L.A. Lakers — 9.7 percent

Others receiving votes: Willie Cauley-Stein, Sacramento; Trey Lyles, Utah

Which rookie will have the best career?

Jahlil Okafor, Philadelphia — 24.1 percent

2. Karl-Anthony Towns, Minnesota — 17.2 percent

T-3. Justin Anderson, Dallas — 13.8 percent

Emmanuel Mudiay, Denver — 13.8 percent

5. Stanley Johnson, Detroit — 8.0 percent

6. Sam Dekker, Houston — 6.9 percent

Others receiving votes: Willie Cauley-Stein, Sacramento; Bobby Portis, Chicago; Kelly Oubre, Washington; Kristaps Porzingis, New York; D’Angelo Russell, L.A. Lakers; Rashad Vaughn, Milwaukee

Picking Okafor for Rookie of the Year doesn’t necessarily mean he should have gone No. 1. The former Duke center is exceptionally polished offensively, and he should fill a big role on the lowly 76ers.

But the “best career” question is essentially asking who should have gone No. 1 – especially considering Towns and Okafor play the same position. Perhaps, a majority of respondents who took a third candidate would have taken Towns over Okafor, changing results of a run-off race. But with the information we have, plurality rules.

The survey also includes other interesting (Mavericks’ Justin Anderson as most athletic), unsurprising (Suns’ Devin Booker as best shooter) and surprising (Rondae Hollis-Jefferson as best defender) responses. Willie Cauley-Stein went No. 6 to the Kings largely based on his ability to guard the interior and exterior. If he’s not elite defensively – and his peers don’t rate him that way, ranking him fourth with 5.9% of votes – questions about his offense and rebounding become more significant.

For the second straight year, Kevin Durant, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James ranked 1-2-3 as rookies’ favorite players.

Of course, don’t take these responses as gospel. Despite 13.8% of respondents – tied for third most – picking Anderson to have the best career, nobody voted for him as the draft’s biggest steal. How you can think the No. 21 pick will have the best career yet isn’t the draft’s biggest steal is beyond me.

Economist: Michael Jordan makes more annually in endorsements than any current NBA player

Michael Jordan

Michael Jordan and LeBron James have sparked a conversation about who’d win a 1-on-1 game between the two in their primes.

Jordan took himself, as did LeBron.

But when it comes to endorsement money, it’s no contest.

Jordan sets a high bar for any potential sponsors, and they’re obviously willing to meet his lofty demands.

Associated Press:

An expert in sports economics says Michael Jordan’s endorsement income has grown and still eclipses that of current NBA players, including LeBron James.

Smith College economist Andrew Zimbalist testified Monday in federal court in Chicago

He says Jordan’s endorsement income was $75.5 million in 2012.

Here are the NBA’s top endorsers in the last year, according to Forbes:

1. LeBron James – $44 million

2. Kevin Durant – $35 million

3. Kobe Bryant – $26 million

It’s quite remarkable that Jordan – 12 years after his last retirement as a player – collects so much sponsorship money. He’s a marketing force unlike any other.

Al Horford waiting until next summer to discuss contract situation

Al Horford
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As the Hawks try to replicate the success of last year’s 60-win campaign, they will have one major question mark hanging over their heads: Al Horford’s impending free agency. Obviously, the marquee free agent next summer will be Kevin Durant, and he will be the object of the biggest free-agency frenzy since LeBron James in 2010. But Horford will be arguably the second-best player on the market, and coming off a bargain five-year, $60 million deal as the salary cap explodes, he’s going to get paid.

Throughout the season, there will be plenty of speculation about Horford’s future, in Atlanta or elsewhere. But one person who will not be participating in that talk is the Dominican big man himself, according to Chris Vivlamore of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

Horford’s free agency talk isn’t going to go away, but with the Hawks looking to be an Eastern Conference contender again, it’s smart of him to nip the speculation early. He may stay with the Hawks and he may not. Either way, he’s going to command a max contract as one of the best and most versatile centers in the NBA at both ends of the floor. It’s a good bet that Atlanta will be aggressive in their effort to keep him. With a good core and coaching staff in place, they have to be considered the clubhouse leaders at this point to sign Horford. But he’ll have no shortage of suitors around the league.