Tag: Kenyon Martin

Andrea Bargnani, Carmelo Anthony, J.R, Smith, Tyson Chandler

Report: Knicks player says team’s CAA clients get preferential treatment


The New York Knicks have deep ties with Creative Artists Agency. It’d be one thing if the Knicks just had good relationships with those agents and that led to them repeatedly signing their players.

But the Knicks reportedly forced their coach, Mike Woodson, to join CAA. And above him, general manager Steve Mills and assistant general managers Mark Warkentein and Allan Houston are also CAA clients.

You can see how that could lead to problems.

Chris Broussard of ESPN:

One Knicks player recently told ESPN.com that the CAA ties were a problem in the locker room.

“You see how guys from CAA are treated differently,” the player said. “How they get away with saying certain things to coaches. How coaches talk to them differently than they talk to the other guys. It’s a problem.”

First, for reference, let’s split the Knicks’ roster into two lists:


  • Carmelo Anthony
  • Andrea Bargnani
  • J.R. Smith


  • Tyson Chandler
  • Amar’e Stoudemire
  • Raymond Felton
  • Iman Shumpert
  • Tim Hardaway Jr.
  • Pablo Prigioni
  • Kenyon Martin
  • Toure’ Murry
  • Cole Aldrich
  • Jeremy Tyler
  • Earl Clark
  • Shannon Brown

With Chris Smith gone, the Knicks are no longer quite as CAA-heavy.

Melo gets preferential treatment, because he’s the team’s best player and a true star. He’d get special privileges no matter which agent represents him.

Bargnani and J.R. Smith? Yeah, I can why (at least) one of their teammates is dismayed.

Smith has gotten a ridiculously long leash from Woodson, and before getting injured, Bargnani regularly started despite poor – and occasionally stupid – play. When all signs point to the Knicks playing better with other players – mostly small lineups that include Tyson Chandler as the only big and two point guards in the backcourt rather than Smith – these two got chance after chance.

Maybe the Knicks are pursuing Phil Jackson, who isn’t a CAA client, to fix these broken processes. Frank Isola of the New York Daily News:

The Knicks under Dolan have maintained a close relationship with CAA, the agency that represents both Anthony and Woodson. The hiring of Jackson could be viewed as Dolan wanting to distance himself from CAA.

“The Knicks and Phil are getting exactly what they want out of this,” said one general manager. “The Knicks are showing that they want to do something and this is a chance for Phil to get the Lakers to make a move. If they don’t, he can take the Knicks’ money.”

Why the Knicks are distancing themselves from CAA now, just before Melo hits free agency, confuses me. It might be the right move at just the wrong time. But New York shouldn’t throw good money after bad, either.

If Jackson can make the Knicks function like the well-run franchise they aren’t, including putting the relationship with CAA on more reasonable grounds, they’ll be getting their money worth.

Meanwhile, Smith and Bargnani will continue to get the money they’re not worth.

It’s too late to completely fix the issue, but Jackson could get New York headed in the right direction.

Wednesday And-1 links: Trade rumor updates, mostly bad news if you want trades

Grizzlies' Tony Allen celebrates on the bench during the third quarter in Game 3 of their NBA Western Conference final playoff basketball series against the San Antonio Spurs in Memphis

Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Today we start off with a heavy dose of trade rumor updates.

• Talks between Memphis and Minnesota on a trade of Tony Allen and Tayshaun Prince for Chase Budinger and J.J. Barea are basically dead in the water. Memphis doesn’t really want to surrender Allen.

• I tried to tell you this wasn’t happening… multiple sources have come forward to say talks between the Suns and Lakers on Pau Gasol are all but dead.

• Speaking of the Lakers, the Cavaliers reportedly have emerged as Brooklyn’s competition for the contract of Jordan Hill that the Lakers want to dump. Neither team want to give the Lakers anything other than salary cap relief, so the question becomes will one of them offer a little bit more to get the deal done.

• Several sources have confirmed that the New Orleans Pelicans have been granted a $4.15 million player exception for the injured Ryan Anderson, which gives them a little more room to play with if they want to make a trade deadline deal.

• The Mavericks reportedly have shown interest in Cleveland’s Luol Deng (who is available). However, they don’t really have the kind of assets that Cleveland wants. Look for Dallas to be a team that goes at Deng hard in the summer.

Charlotte reportedly has interest in the Pelican’s Anthony Morrow.

• The Bucks have interest in Austin Rivers of the Pelicans.

Washington and other teams have interest in the Bucks’ Luke Ridnour, who could be a solid reserve point guard on a playoff team.

• However, if you’re looking for a Buck who could be moved, the smart money is still on Gary Neal, several teams interested on that front.


• In case you don’t check out TMZ, here is what Kenyon Martin said about sleeved jerseys: “I think [sleeved jerseys] are WNBA jerseys. We had to wear them on Christmas, so I had to go with it. That’s the job. You gotta wear the company uniform.”

Ugh. First Kenyon, those WNBA ladies can flat-out ball and the Knicks should have the ball movement and floor spacing the New York Liberty have. Second, as Adam Silver said at All-Star Game and we at PBT have told you before, those jerseys are exceeding sales expectations by the league and as long as that is the case you will see them.

• Denver’s Ty Lawson has joined forces with PETA and has a new ad out saying “I Choose Ink, Not Mink.”

Amar’e Stoudemire says Mike Woodson, not minutes limit, keeping him off the court

Washington Wizards v New York Knicks

Amar’e Stoudemire began the season on a minutes limit after undergoing two knee surgeries last year.

Through five games, he was averaging fewer than five minutes per game. Since, his playing time steadily ticked upward, peaking at nearly 20 minutes per game.

Then, Stoudemire missed seven games with an ankle injury. In two games since returning, he’s played just four and 17 minutes.


But Stoudemire said Mike Woodson, not a medically determined minutes limit, is holding him back this time.

Stoudemire, via Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPNNewYork.com:

“From a doctor’s standpoint, there hasn’t been limitations since the first week of the season,” Stoudemire said when asked if he wanted to throw out any minutes limitations in an effort to help the New York Knicks make the playoffs. “So we can’t keep saying limitations — that’s a coach’s decision at the end of the day.

“I feel great,” he continued. “I am ready to play. But it’s up to him if he wants to play me or not.”

“Yeah, I talk to Coach all the time about it,” Stoudemire said. “He knows I am ready. He knows how hard I train. He watches me in the weight room and also on the basketball court. The whole training staff knows, the Knicks organization knows how hard I train.

Stoudemire might not have his playing cut directly because of injury, but that’s the primary factor. He’s 31 and has a lot of mileage on him. He’s just no longer the same player he once was.

Tyson Chandler is – by far – the Knicks’ best big man, and they also function best with a small-ball lineup. That’s partially because Carmelo Anthony has become a better power forward than small forward and partially because New York’s traditional power forwards – Stoudemire, Andrea Bargnani and Kenyon Martin – just aren’t that good anymore.

Unlike last season, when he was an offensive force in his limited minutes, Stoudemire  is now a backup who plays like a backup. Stoudemire deserves the role he has on this team, because he’s healthy. If he were still hobbled, he probably should play even less than he does.

Like with Carlos Boozer yesterday, I have no problem with Stoudemire saying he wants more minutes. As a competitor, he should want more minutes. He talked to his coach about it, and that’s the key step. At this point, there’s no harm in him sharing his desires with the public.

It’s just not in the Knicks’ best interest to give Stoudemire a larger role, and that – not a minutes limit – is really all this comes down to.

Report: Knicks make late push for Andrew Bynum, still looking for another big man

Chicago Bulls v Cleveland Cavaliers

For a team that has had its success this season playing small ball, the Knicks have a lot of guys in their frontcourt. They start Tyson Chandler and Carmelo Anthony but behind them are Kenyon Martin, Amar’e Stoudemire, Andrea Bargnani, Jeremy Tyler and Cole Aldrich.

The challenge has been keeping all those banged-up bodies healthy and contributing.

So the Knicks seem to be looking to add another frontcourt body — and that effort started with trying to land Andrew Bynum.

The Knicks made a late run at Bynum, reports the New York Post.

Knicks personnel director Mark Warkentien tried to arrange a meeting with Bynum and the Knicks staff, but it never materialized.

“The Knicks were very aggressive in the end,” his New York-based agent David Lee told The Post. “In the end, they did everything they could.”

Bynum signed with the Pacers. The issue with the Knicks was money — Bynum wanted more than the minimum ($550,000 for the rest of the season) and the capped-out Knicks couldn’t offer it. The Pacers, who had their mid-level exception left, could and spent $1 million to lock up Bynum for the season.

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This move signals the Knicks are still targeting a big to go with their rotation, reports the Post.

The Knicks, who face the moribund Bucks Monday at Bradley Center, are still concerned with their big-man depth and durability. Amar’e Stoudemire and Kenyon Martin returned for Saturday’s 106-91 loss to the Heat and Metta World Peace is allegedly healthy too after platelet rich plasma therapy. But all three are major injury risks with chronic issues.

If you’re asking yourself “why would the Knicks add a big man so Mike Woodson can keep going with big lineups?” you’d be asking a smart question. The Knicks have had their run of success with a Raymond Felton, Pablo Prigioni, J.R. Smith starting lineup and some depth behind them (rather than trading Iman Shumpert for another big) would seem to make more sense.

The Knicks have 15 guys on the roster so to add anyone would require either a trade or to waive a player such as Toure Murry or Aldrich. At this point in the season those guys would still get paid for the full year.

The Extra Pass: Should Indiana be worried about its offense? And Tuesday’s recaps.

Indiana Pacers v Los Angeles Lakers


LOS ANGELES — Indiana is the best team in the NBA right now — they have the best record in the league (by percentage points over Oklahoma City) and they have the best point differential in the league. The Pacers are legitimate title contenders.

They have done all that in spite of their offense.

The Pacers are scoring 102.8 points per 100 possessions this season, which is 18th best in the NBA. That pedestrian number is masked by their top ranked defense, and with that they still have the best point differential in the league per possession. While there have been stretches where the offense has been above average, it has at no point been elite.

Is that something to worry about?

“Yea, a little bit, we want to be in the Top 10,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel said before his team took on the Lakers Tuesday night — and struggled for a half on offense against one of the league’s worst defenses. “With where our defense is, we feel if we are in the top 10 we are where we want to be. It’s probably not as high as we want to be.”

“We’ve got to get back to being consistent on the offensive end, sharing the ball, moving it, setting guys up, getting guys open and continuing to play for one another,” Paul George said.

Tuesday night the Pacers looked like a team with tired legs at the end of a road trip —George was 4-of-21 and didn’t have the lift we are accustomed to. Danny Granger was 3-of-10 shooting. As a team the Pacers were 2-of-11 from three in the first half.

Once again, as it has been for much of the season, it was left to Lance Stephenson to create offense, particularly on the perimeter in the half court. He responded, as he has much of the season — but Vogel admitted this was not the vision he had starting the season.

“I wanted to expand his role,” Vogel said of his plans for Stephenson going into training camp. “What I envisioned was getting him out early, bringing him back to play with the bench unit and running offense through him. That sort of expanded when he started producing with the starting unit. So obviously, we’re a balanced team and we’re going to go to the hot hand so to speak, or to whoever is making the most efficient plays. With the second unit that’s who we’re going with, but a lot of times with the first unit he’s been great too.”

The second unit is becoming a little more about Granger, who is in a sixth man role that he willingly has accepted. But Granger is not yet his old self.

“He’s coming, he’s coming,” Vogel said of Granger. “He’s not there yet, he knows that. There’s going to be good nights and not so good nights, good plays and not so good plays. When you come back from a major knee surgery like that you’re not really yourself until the second year. He’s only 18 or 19 games. But he’s got four months to play before we start the playoffs, and that’s where we think he will be the biggest factor for us.”

Against the Lakers — who want to run but don’t really bother to play transition defense — the Pacers got 17.4 percent of their attempts in transition. That’s part of the plan, Vogel said, describing what he wants the Pacers to play with is “intelligent tempo.”

“We want to explore for early strikes every time we get the ball, we don’t want to do it at the cost of turnovers, low turnovers, and (we want) great shots — not good shots, or average shots, or bad shots. Great shots and low turnovers,” Vogel said.

Come the playoffs, there will be less of that — which is fine by Indiana. The game slows down in the playoffs and that means the Pacers can get back and set their fierce defense.

But they are still going to have to score in the half court, and do it a bit more efficiently than they have to this point. At least they’ll need to against Miami and it’s aggressive defense (the rest of the East, it won’t matter). The Pacers have time to get back to what Paul George seems to remember them doing better.

Their offense isn’t really something to worry about, but a little concern is not out of order.

—Kurt Helin

source:  Pelicans 100, Cavaliers 89: Anthony Davis put up a monster stat line of 30 points, seven rebounds and eight blocked shots for the Pelicans, who had little trouble with a Cavs team playing without Anderson Varejao due to injury. On the Cavs’ side, Kyrie Irving was average and Dion Waiters was slightly above, but the bright spot was rookie and number one overall draft pick Anthony Bennett, who cracked double figures scoring for the first time with 15 points and eight rebounds in 31 minutes of action. — Brett Pollakoff

Knicks 114, Celtics 88: The Knicks got their third straight victory, and got a small measure of revenge in the process. Boston handed New York two of their worst losses of the season, but this time the result was never in doubt for the Knicks. New York led by as many as 35 points in this one before the game came to its merciful conclusion. Kenyon Martin returned to action, but left with another injury that appeared to be related to his chronic ankle issues. Iman Shumpert also left in the first quarter with a shoulder injury and did not return, and his status moving forward remains unknown. It was an easy win for the Knicks, but a potentially costly one. –BP

Rockets 97, Spurs 90: Each team was missing one of its key players, but the game remained largely competitive nonetheless. The Spurs were without Kawhi Leonard due to a foot fracture, and the Rockets were without James Harden due to a bruised left thumb. San Antonio squandered a 15-point first half lead, and Houston rallied with a 33-18 third quarter that put them in command. Jeremy Lin hit some clutch shots late to seal it, and Dwight Howard finished with 23 points and 16 rebounds, but shot just 5-of-15 from the field. Howard shot a ridiculous 25 free throws, making 13 as part of San Antonio’s strategy to intentionally put him on the line. As punishment from the gods for employing this soul-crushing strategy, Boris Diaw led the Spurs with 22 points. Houston is now 3-0 against San Antonio on the season, the first time since 1997 where they’ll win the season series. — BP

Pistons 103, Magic 87: Detroit snapped a four-game losing streak thanks to a big performance from Andre Drummond, who finished with 13 points, 17 rebounds and a couple of blocked shots. The Pistons had a 22-point advantage in the paint, and Orlando rookie Victor Oladipo finished with a team-high 19 points off the bench in the losing effort. — BP

Grizzlies 98, Trail Blazers 81: Memphis plays good defense and that was able to turn ever Trail Blazer not named LaMarcus Aldridge (27 points) into a poor shooter — Blazers besides Aldridge shot 29.7 percent. On the other side, Portland is not a strong defensive team and the Grizzlies took advantage racing out 10-0 to open the game, going on to put up 61 first half points on 56.5 percent shooting and hit 4-of-8 threes, Mike Conley had 16 of his 19 in the first half, Zach Randolph had 23 on the night (but needed 22 shots). Damian Lillard was 2-of-9 from three leading a 4-of-24 shooting from beyond the arc night for Portland, and they need those buckets to fall for their offense to click. — Kurt Helin

 Wizards 88, Warriors 85: It felt like this game was played with those just-a-little-to-small carnival basketball rims — the winning Wizards shot 37.8 percent, the losing Warriors 37.5 percent. Stephen Curry had 23 points but needed 23 shots to get there, while Klay Thompson was 5-of-17 and David Lee was 2-of-10. Bradley Beal had 20 points, John Wall was just 6-of-19 shooting but he hit a three with 1:28 left that proved to be the game winner. –KH

 Pacers 104, Lakers 92: Indiana looked like a team on the end of a 10-day trip — they had no legs and it showed with Paul George shooting 4-of-21 and Roy Hibbert was 5-of-11 shooting. That’s why this was a tied game at the half. But the Pacers win with defense — they held the Lakers to 39.4 percent shooting — and by limiting their own mistakes, such as only giving up 4 turnovers all game. Those things and a deeper bench had the Pacers pulling away to win in the second half. Lance Stephenson led the way with 16 points on 6-of-9 shooting, plus he had 14 rebounds. Pau Gasol kept his run of strong play going with 21 points and 13 rebounds. –KH