Tag: Kawhi Leonard

Manu Ginobili, Tony Parker

Manu Ginobili will announce decision on his future in an Argentine newspaper “when the time comes”


When the Spurs hit free agency on July 1, it’s widely expected that Tim Duncan will be back in the fold for at least one more year, and that they’ll make serious pushes for top-tier free agents LaMarcus Aldridge and Marc Gasol. But one other domino that has to fall for San Antonio is the future of Manu Ginobili. When the time comes for him to announce whether he’ll return or retire, it will be in a newspaper in his native Argentina.

From Mike Monroe of the San Antonio Express-News:

Spurs fans anxious to know if Manu Ginobili will be back for another season may want to brush up on their Spanish and bookmark the website for the Argentine newspaper, ‘La Nacion.’

The 37-year-old guard on Sunday told the Express-News he will announce his decision in a self-written sports column in ‘La Nacion’ “when the time comes.”

Presumably, that time will be before he hits the free agent market at the stroke of midnight, EDT, on Tuesday.

That could go any number of ways. If Duncan is returning for another year, there’s a reasonable chance Ginobili will as well. Both Duncan and Ginobili will probably take salaries that are well below what they made last season (Ginobili made $7 million), so San Antonio will have the space to go after free agents as well as re-signing Danny Green and, most importantly, Kawhi Leonard.

Report: Spurs ‘operating under the premise’ that Tim Duncan will return next season

Tim Duncan

Tim Duncan is an unrestricted free agent this summer, but there isn’t a single team outside of San Antonio that believes it has even a remote chance of convincing him to jump ship.

The only question where Duncan is concerned is whether or not he’ll return to play for the Spurs for a 19th NBA season. And just as recent reports have indicated, the latest has the team operating as though he will in fact be back to do exactly that.

Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

The San Antonio Spurs are operating under the premise that Tim Duncan will return in 2015-16 for a 19th NBA season, according to league sources.

Although Duncan and fellow Spurs mainstay Manu Ginobili have yet to make formal declarations about their plans for next season, sources said that the Spurs are optimistic about re-signing both at salaries that will allow the team to re-sign prized restricted free agent Kawhi Leonard this summer and to pursue top-tier free agent LaMarcus Aldridge.

Duncan could easily sign a “wink-wink deal” that would essentially mean stretching out his money for next season over two years instead. The Spurs could do the same with Manu Ginobili (assuming he returns, too), thus making their pursuit of free agents like Aldridge that much easier under the salary cap.

As for Aldridge, he’ll have the Lakers to consider, as well. But if San Antonio returns the bulk of the roster intact for one more season, you’d have to like their chances of signing him, considering the team’s projected ability at that point to contend for a title once again.

Justise Winslow’s winning paradox

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - APRIL 06: Justise Winslow #12 of the Duke Blue Devils celebrates after defeating the Wisconsin Badgers during the NCAA Men's Final Four National Championship at Lucas Oil Stadium on April 6, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Duke defeated Wisconsin 68-63. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

NEW YORK – The feeling of success has followed Justise Winslow everywhere he’s been on his road to the NBA. In his freshman season at St. John’s he led the high school to their first Texas state championship since 1979 and then added two more championships to the school’s trophy case before heading to Duke.

In his only season in Durham, Winslow tasted the sweet flavor of championship glory as he helped guide Coach K and the Blue Devils to their fifth championship in school history, but when a player shows the flashes Winslow has shown throughout his life on the AAU circuit through college, a paradox is created when the player decides to head to the NBA.

When a high school kid displays a certain level of excellence, elite college programs will send letters and swag to try and acquire their services. When the kid continues to display a similar level of success at the college level, it’s time to try your luck in the NBA, but the Spurs, Warriors, and Clippers aren’t sending letters or cute little stuffed mascots in order to swing a player’s choice regarding a place to continue their career. It’s the bottom feeders in the NBA food chain that are chomping at the bit to obtain a player that can help them climb back up to the top.

The process puts someone like Winslow in a somewhat awkward spot, because if he ends up landing anywhere in his current draft projection (anywhere between the Knicks at four and the Heat at 10) he’s going to head to a team that has and will likely continue feeling a sensation that Winslow has avoided for most of his basketball life.


“Yeah it’s not a concern, but it’s just something that you have to understand. It’s a process. I won a lot,” Winslow said during the pre-draft interviews. ”For me to be able to deal with losing it’s something that I’m going to have to understand. Part of the maturing process is being able to take those losses and get better from them.”

When you watch film of Winslow, it’s easy to understand how he’s put himself in this position. He has the potential to become an elite defender along the lines of Jimmy Butler and Kawhi Leonard. His 6’ 6”, 222 lb frame gives him the ability to switch off of a guard onto a big in a pick-and-roll, a key in this era of the NBA and his 6’ 10.25” wingspan helps him contest shots at the rim just in case a guard does get by him.

So what is it about his defense that makes him so tantalizing on that end of the floor? “I think my ability to use my hands and use my lower body to stay in front of guys,” Winslow told NBCSports’ ProBasketballTalk. “I’m just too physical and athletic that I just wear guys down by the end of the game.”

His offensive game has drawn comparisons to James Harden and when you watch him drive to the hoop or pull up from deep it’s hard to not see a younger, less hairy version of Harden. Winslow and Harden were almost identical in their freshman seasons in terms of threes attempted and made (Harden made 44 out of 108 and Winslow made 46 out of 110). Harden did get to the line much more than Winslow did during their freshman campaigns (270 compared to 156).

Winslow has received some criticism regarding the mechanics of his shot, specifically the trajectory of his shot, but it’s not something Winslow is concerned about, “I haven’t changed any mechanics,” Winslow told ProBasketballTalk. “I’ve just been putting up more reps and building up muscle memory.”

When you’re being compared to Harden on offense and Leonard/Butler on defense, your future is pretty bright to say the least. Justise Winslow just has to make sure the darkness of losing doesn’t gobble up the light of glory that has guided him to this spot.

Twitter – @ScottDargis

Report: NBA attempting to discourage teams from saying they’ll match offers on restricted free agents

Jimmy Butler, Giannis Antetokounmpo

For as long as anyone can remember, teams with stars facing restricted free agency have been saying publicly that they’ll match any offer sheet those players get. It’s a way of both reassuring fans that their favorite player is in the team’s long-term plans and making other teams think twice about tying up their cap space with an offer sheet.

According to a new report by ESPN.com’s Marc Stein, the NBPA isn’t thrilled about the practice, and the league is attempting to discourage teams from doing it.

ESPN.com has learned that the NBA, as far back as November, issued a memo to all teams warning them that the NBA Players Association has officially taken the position that the well-worn “we’ll match any offer” reflex strategy and its corresponding intent to discourage interest in a particular RFA is a circumvention of the salary cap.

The league’s memo, sources said, took the rare step of further cautioning teams that, while the NBA itself doesn’t concur with the NBPA’s view, league officials see enough potential merit in the union’s stance to advise those who persist with match-any-offer chatter that they could be opening themselves up to legal action.

This is going to be a big summer for restricted free agents: the Bulls’ Jimmy Butler, the Warriors’ Draymond Green, the Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard, the Pistons’ Reggie Jackson, the Cavs’ Tristan Thompson and the Bucks’ Khris Middleton lead this year’s crop. All of those players will undoubtedly draw interest around the league, but particularly in the case of Butler, Leonard and Green, it’s widely expected that their teams will match anything.

This stance against the “we’ll-match-any-offer” rhetoric is right in line with the approach NPBA executive director Michele Roberts has taken since she started as the leader of the players’ union. It’s exactly what she should be doing. Restricted free agency is a tricky issue, because the NBA wants teams, particularly those in small markets, to have a mechanism to keep their young stars, and the players want the freedom to choose their own teams.

There is some merit to the idea that a team saying publicly that they’ll match all offers can kill a player’s earning power and leverage. Under normal circumstances, Eric Bledsoe would have been one of the most sought-after free agents on the market last summer, but teams were so convinced that the Suns would match their offer sheets that they showed no appetite whatsoever for going after him. Bledsoe dangled in restricted free agency until almost the start of training camp, when he finally agreed to a five-year, $70 million deal to stay with the Suns. Roberts wants to prevent a similar situation from taking place with someone like Butler or Middleton.

LeBron James becomes first player to lead NBA Finals in points, rebounds and assists


Andre Iguodala – fittingly, though not deservedlywon NBA Finals MVP.

Iguodala had an impressive series, the culmination of a stellar and unselfish season. This is no knock on him.

But he doesn’t hold a candle to LeBron James’ production.

The Cavaliers forward became the first player to lead a Finals in points, rebounds and assists – averaging 35.8, 13.3 and 8.8 per game.

Really, it shouldn’t be a surprise LeBron broke that barrier. Nobody had come closer than him in 2012 and 2013 with the Heat.

In 2012, LeBron led the series against the Thunder in rebounds and assists but finished second in points to Kevin Durant. In 2013, LeBron led the series against the Spurs in points and assists but finished third in rebounds to Tim Duncan and Kawhi Leonard.

To measure how close a player came to leading the Finals in all three major stats, we’ll add the percentage of the leader in each per-game category. So, if a player led the series in a stat, it’s 100%. If he had 30 points per game to the leader’s 40 points per game, that’s 75%. Add the percentage for each category, so a perfect score is 300%.

Before his 300% this year, LeBron had 293% in 2012 and 290% in 2013.

In the years Basketball-Reference.com has Finals data for all three stats (1952, 1955-1958, 1960-2015), 18 players have cracked 250%. Here’s each with the player’s stats/leader’s stats (rank in the series):


Player Points Rebounds Assists Total
LeBron James (2015 CLE) 35.8/35.8 (1) 100% 13.3/13.3 (1) 100% 8.8/8.8 (1) 100% 300%
LeBron James (2012 MIA) 28.6/30.6 (2) 93% 10.2/10.2 (1) 100% 7.4/7.4 (1) 100% 293%
LeBron James (2013 MIA) 25.3/25.3 (1) 100% 10.9/12.1 (3) 90% 7/7 (1) 100% 290%
Magic Johnson (1987 LAL) 26.2/26.2 (1) 100% 8/10 (3) 80% 13/13 (1) 100% 280%
Larry Bird (1986 BOS) 24/25.8 (3) 93% 9.7/11.8 (2) 82% 9.5/9.5 (1) 100% 275%
Shaquille O’Neal (2001 LAL) 33/35.6 (2) 93% 15.8/15.8 (1) 100% 4.8/6 (4) 80% 273%
Tim Duncan (2003 SAS) 24.2/24.2 (1) 100% 17/17 (1) 100% 5.3/7.8 (2) 68% 268%
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (1974 MIL) 32.6/32.6 (1) 100% 12.1/12.1 (1) 100% 5.4/8.3 (3) 65% 265%
Shaquille O’Neal (1995 ORL) 28/32.8 (2) 85% 12.5/12.5 (1) 100% 6.3/8 (3) 79% 264%
Larry Bird (1981 BOS) 15.3/22.2 (3) 69% 15.3/16.3 (2) 94% 7/7 (1) 100% 263%
Michael Jordan (1991 CHI) 31.2/31.2 (1) 100% 6.6/9.4 (6) 70% 11.4/12.4 (2) 92% 262%
Bill Walton (1977 POR) 18.5/30.3 (4) 61% 19/19 (1) 100% 5.2/5.2 (1) 100% 261%
Hakeem Olajuwon (1995 HOU) 32.8/32.8 (1) 100% 11.5/12.5 (3) 92% 5.5/8 (4) 69% 261%
Magic Johnson (1988 LAL) 21.1/22 (3) 96% 5.7/8.9 (6) 64% 13/13 (1) 100% 260%
Scottie Pippen (1992 CHI) 20.8/35.8 (3) 58% 8.3/8.7 (2) 95% 7.7/7.7 (1) 100% 254%
Dwyane Wade (2006 MIA) 34.7/34.7 (1) 100% 7.8/10.8 (5) 72% 3.8/4.7 (2) 81% 253%
George Mikan (1952 MNL) 21.7/21.7 (1) 100% 17.4/17.4(1) 100% 2.4/4.7 (5) 51% 251%
LeBron James (2007 CLE) 22/24.5 (2) 90% 7/11.5 (4) 61% 6.8/6.8 (1) 100% 251%

Of those 18 players, 14 won titles. LeBron in 2015 and 2007, Abdul-Jabbar in 1974 and Shaq in 1995 did not.