Tag: jump shot


Wall hoping for a breakout sophomore campaign


John Wall’s rookie-year numbers weren’t bad, and the Wizards point guard definitely showed flashes of stunning athleticism and amazing court vision during his first season in the NBA.

Wall averaged 16 points and 8 assists last season, a feat only equaled by Russell Westbrook and Deron Williams, and showed that he has unlimited potential for improvement. Still, there’s at least one person who wasn’t satisfied with Wall’s rookie season: Wall himself. Yahoo!’s Marc Spears has the story:

HARBOR CITY, Calif. – In his first season in the NBA, John Wall(notes) was just one of three players to average more than 16 points and eight assists. The other two: All-Star point guards Deron Williams(notes) andRussell Westbrook(notes).

And yet Wall knows everyone – including himself – was expecting more from the top pick in the 2010 draft.

“I don’t think anybody respected it,” Wall said of his rookie season. “I don’t want to blame my injuries – things happen in this world – but I think I would have had a better rookie season. You see how I played when I started the season healthy. When I injured myself, I lost confidence. When I injured myself, I didn’t have the energy.”

Wall’s season was injury-plagued, and that did give him a lot of trouble, but if he wants to have a breakout season next year, his jump shot should be his first priority. Wall’s court vision is tremendous, and even with his foot injuries he was able to get to the rim and score very well, but he was a liability every time he threw up a jumper. According to Hoopdata, Wall shot just 30% on 3-9 foot shots, 28% on 10-15 foot jumpers (a shot that should be his bread and butter, considering his ballhandling and change-of-direction ability), 30% on 16-23 foot jumpers, and 29.6% on three-pointers.

All of that led to Wall shooting only 41% from the field, and his True Shooting percentage was an ugly 49.5%. Plenty of athletic players have come into the NBA without a jump shot, only to find one later in their career. If Wall wants to meet his goals next season, simply being healthy won’t be enough — he’ll have to realize that his jumpshot has to be rebuilt, and be ready to punish teams from both the inside and the outside as a scorer.

Derrick Rose, knocking down threes but missing in the midrange

Derrick Rose, Charlie Villanueva
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You know what Derrick Rose was doing this summer? Well, besides eating a lot of Skittles?

Working on his jump shot and three point shooting. He would tell anyone and everyone around Team USA about the new form and how it was going to help.

And it has helped. When he uses it.

Rose is much more dangerous from three — he has gone from shooting 26.7 percent last season to 38.1 percent this season.

So why is his overall field goal percentage down from 48.9 percent last season to 45.6 percent this season?

He’s not trusting his improved jump shot in the midrange and because of it is missing. A lot. As Sebastian Pruiti breaks down at Basketball Prospectus.

His shooting from 16 to 23 feet has dropped from 44 percent last year to 41 percent last year. From 10 to 15 feet, it is even worse. Rose’s shooting percentage from that area on the court has gone from 50 percent last year to 27.5 percent this year.

This drop-off goes hand in hand with the fact that Rose is taking more shots off of the dribble from both midrange distances…When watching Rose’s shots off of the dribble, the problem isn’t his form. The real problem is Rose rarely gets set and take pull up jumpers in the midrange, opting for various floaters and runners instead. Now, Rose is very good at these floaters at the rim, but the farther away he is, the more he struggles with them.

Use the jumper, Derrick. Let go, Derrick. Trust me. Trust your feelings. Remember, a point guard can feel the jump shot running through him.