Tag: Josh Powell

Toronto Raptors centre Jonas Valanciunas (17) gets a piggy back ride from Houston Rockets forward Donatas Motiejunas (20) who was trying to box him out at the line

Report: Rockets to exercise team options on Donatas Motiejunas, Terrence Jones

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NBA rookie-scale contracts give first-round picks two guaranteed seasons followed by two years with team options. Unlike most team options, these must be exercised a full year in advance.

So, a team decides on a third-year option before a player’s second season and on a fourth-year option before a player’s third season. The annual deadline is Oct. 31 (or next business day if it doesn’t fall on one).

Given that the rookie scale is team friendly, many of these options are no-brainers. Of course, the Trail Blazers want Damian Lillard for $4,236,287 in 2015-16.

But there are several close calls around the NBA, including in Houston.

Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

Though Rockets coach Kevin McHale called the Rockets’ power forward position open, saying he needs to see more physical defense and rebounding from the position, a vote of confidence for his returning power forwards, Terrence Jones and Donatas Motiejunas, is expected before the season begins.

The Rockets intend to pick up their fourth-year option on the contracts for both players, a person with knowledge of the plan said on Tuesday.

Exercising Jones’ $2,489,530 option is an easy call. He’s Houston’s starting power forward, and that’s great value for any starter, let alone an underrated young player like Jones.

Keeping Motiejunas for $2,288,205 in 2015-16 is a tougher call – and one that will produce ripple effects throughout the roster.

The Rockets have 14 guaranteed contracts plus Patrick Beverley, Kostas Papanikolaou, Josh Powell, Robert Covington, Tarik Black and Akil Mitchell. They must trim their roster to reach the regular-season maximum of 15 players.

I thought Motiejunas was a candidate to go, but the Rockets aren’t going to exercise his option just to waive him. This means, barring an unexpected development between now and month’s end, he’s staying.

Covington and Mitchell each have $150,000 guarantees, but in a roster crunch, the Rockets can eat that money. In fact, they were probably planning on doing so with Mitchell, giving him a guarantee so they can waive him and assign him to their D-League affiliate. Powell and Black are unguaranteed and easy drops.

That leaves 16 players for 15 spots.

Beverley has an unguaranteed salary, but he’s Houston’s starting point guard. He won’t be waived.

Papanikolaou, drafted in 2012, just came over. His salary is unguaranteed until tomorrow, but why would the Rockets sign him now – and why would he sign – if he were going to be waived before the preseason gets underway? His salary ($4,591,066) is indicative of a player who will stick in Houston for at least a season.

That would mean 14 players – all with fully guaranteed contracts – are vying 13 spots.

Dwight Howard and James Harden obviously aren’t going anywhere. As covered, Jones and Motiejunas are in.

So, we’re down to 10 players for nine spots.

Houston signed Trevor Ariza, Clint Capela, Joey Dorsey, Francisco Garcia, Jeff Adrien, Ish Smith, Troy Daniels and Nick Johnson this offseason. Plans can change on the fly, but obviously the Rockets wouldn’t sign someone to a fully guaranteed contract without an idea of they’d use him in the upcoming season.

And then there were two and one roster spot remaining – Isaiah Canaan and Jason Terry.

Canaan, the No. 34 pick in 2013, played just 22 games as a rookie. However, he impressed in the D-League, averaging 21.8 points and 8.2 assists per game.

Terry, 37, missed most of last season due to injury. The Kings gave Houston draft picks just to take him. The Rockets have probably already gotten their main return in the deal, though Terry could provide leadership and a spark off the bench. But he’s still battling health issues.

The competition between Canaan and Terry is on, but other Rockets could fall into the race with a poor preseason.

Report: Rockets and Ramon Sessions interested in sign-and-trade with Bucks

Ramon Sessions, Patrick Beverley

Despite the unraveling of their depth this offseason, the Rockets are likely to make the playoffs next season.

Dwight Howard and James Harden are stars. Terrence Jones, Patrick Beverley and Trevor Ariza are solid starters.

It’s the bench that could really use work, including point guard. Houston downgraded from Jeremy Lin at backup one to recently signed Ish Smith and unproven Isaiah Canaan, neither of whom are proven rotation players.

How about Ramon Sessions, one of the best unrestricted free agents left on the market?

Alex Kennedy of Basketball Insiders:

I get why Houston is interested in Sessions. He’s a pick-and-roll ace who can both get to the rim and distribute, though his defense is lacking.

But there are several small hurdles, which collectively add up to a decently sized impediment.

For one, there’s reaching a deal with Sessions. At this point, I figured a team could steal Sessions for a minimum contract, but if that were the case, Houston would just sign him outright. The Rockets have the bi-annual exception, which should be enough for Sessions, but they likely want to keep that available next summer. Hence, the sign-and-trade possibility – always a more-complicated option.

Houston is also over the regular-season roster limit of 15. Even if they waive the unguaranteed contracts of Alonzo Gee, Scotty Hopson and Josh Powell and the partially guaranteed contract of Robert Covington, the Rockets would have 15 players before Sessions.

That could be another reason a sign-and-trade makes sense, but the Bucks have 15 guaranteed contracts plus the desirable Kendall Marshall and expendable Chris Wright, both of whom have unguaranteed contracts. So, Milwaukee can’t mindlessly take back an extra player in a trade.

It’s tough to see all three sides making this work, but it’s easy to see why they’re trying. The Rockets could use a better backup point guard. The market has mostly dried up for Sessions. And the Bucks, who no longer have a place for Sessions, would love to get return for him. There’s definitely a chance for a deal to be reached.

Rockets can’t keep Dwight Howard, James Harden and Chandler Parsons and give Chris Bosh max contract

Miami Heat v Houston Rockets

Chris Bosh wants he and LeBron James to re-sign with the Heat.

But considering LeBron left his meeting with Pat Riley today without committing to Miami, there’s no guarantee Bosh will have that option. So, the Rockets are trying to poach the power forward, reportedly offering him a max contract.

One problem: Houston can’t easily clear max cap space for Bosh.

As soon as Chandler Parsons officially signs his offer sheet with the Mavericks, the Rockets will have 72 hours to act. If they match Dallas’ offer, Parsons’ cap hold ($2,875,130) will immediately be replaced on the books by his 2014-15 salary, which is at or near the max ($14,746,000).

Obviously, Houston wants to delay that as long as possible. Signing Bosh first with cap space first and then exceeding the cap to re-sign Parsons – something possible only as long as his cap hold remains on the books – is the Rockets’ ideal plan.

However, even if the roster is stripped to just Dwight Howard, James Harden and Parsons’ cap hold, Houston still couldn’t offer Bosh a max contract.

The Rockets could come close, offering $83,088,781 over four years. Bosh’s max with Houston is $88,151,588 over four years.

Maybe Bosh doesn’t care about that $5,062,807 difference. If so, more power to him.

However, he was reportedly dismayed by Miami lowballing him. I’m not sure he’s running to Houston on a discount.

And for the Rockets to offer even that much, they’d have to dump several players – including starters Patrick Beverley and Terrence Jones. Bosh would replace Jones at power forward, making that departure less of a big deal.

But Jeremy Lin is already ready set to be moved, and if Beverley is gone too, who plays point guard? Without either, Houston is much less appealing.

Bosh could sacrifice more salary – $6,804,570 total over four years – to give the Rockets room to keep Beverley, but again, that makes their offer less appealing.

If the Rockets let Parsons walk, Houston could could max out Bosh while keeping Beverley (and one of Omri Casspi, Isaiah Canaan, Robert Covington or Josh Powell or Troy Daniels’ qualifying offer). Once more, the Rockets without a key player – Parsons in this case – are much less appealing.

Does Bosh understand all this?


One of two conflicting reports say Bosh is sold on Houston as his backup option if LeBron leaves the Heat.

Chris Broussard and Brian Windhorst of ESPN?

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

The Rockets – and therefore Bosh – will soon be on a 72-hour clock to make this work. But as long as Houston wants to keep its two stars, Howard and Harden, and Parsons, a max offer to Bosh is not possible.

If the Rockets let Parsons walk, they could find max cap room for Bosh, but then the timetable wouldn’t matter. There would be no Parsons-related deadline.

Unless Bosh is willing to take less than the max – a possibility – it’s shaking up to be Bosh or Parsons for the Rockets. Or if they gamble wrong and let Parsons walk and LeBron re-signs with the Heat, neither.

It’s just hard to see Houston, again if Bosh truly wants the max, getting both.

Rockets decline team options on Troy Daniels, Chandler Parsons; Francisco Garcia opts out

Dwight Howard, Chandler Parsons

The Rockets’ offseason will be a series of small moves that may or may not culminate in Houston adding a third star to play with Dwight Howard and James Harden.

Opportunities to increase cap space and landmines that could destroy it are tied to so many players on Houston’s roster. Even how a few marginal Rockets are handled could make the difference.

Three of those moves, including the expected decline of Chandler Parsons’ option, have broken.

Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

The Rockets are showing a lot of trust in Parsons, and to a lesser degree, Daniels.

Parsons could nuke Houston’s cap space any time once free agency begins by signing an offer sheet with another team. The Rockets would likely match and keep Parsons, but his cap hit would immediately jump to his 2014-15 salary (likely around $10 million per year). Right now, he counts just $2,875,130 against the cap.

Daniels could accept his qualifying offer – a one-year contract worth $1,016,482 – at any time. Had Houston simply exercised his team option, he would have made just $816,482. Unless the Rockets are gung-ho about securing such a marginal player on a multi-year deal, they’ll likely pull his qualifying offer and maybe renounce him just before signing a quality free agent. In the meantime, the qualifying offer serves to cool other interested teams. In exchange for waiting to sign, I bet Daniels will get a larger salary – either through the room exception or non-bird exception.

Garcia is doing Houston a favor. He was slated to make a minimum salary, so his only risk in opting out is not getting a new contract. If he plays next year, his salary can be no lower than what he would have made by opting in. The Rockets, who could use his salary off the books while they pursue bigger fish, likely promised him a roster spot next season if he opts out. They can always go over the cap later to give him a minimum deal.

Essentially, Houston is placing some value in keeping Parsons and Daniels beyond next season. That might hinder the Rockets’ attempts to sign a star, but if they trust Parsons and Daniels, it won’t. It’s really in the players’ hands whether, and to what degree, this backfires.

With these moves, if the Rockets renounce Garcia and Jordan Hamilton, waive Omri Casspi, Robert Covington and Josh Powell (each on fully unguaranteed contracts) and take back no guaranteed salary in the Omer Asik trade, they’d fall $7,928,630 below the projected salary cap.

Pulling Daniels’ qualifying offer when the time comes would add

$509,146 in cap room. Houston could do the same with Parsons, though that’s riskier given the demand for his services, and get an extra $2,367,794 in cap room.

Really, the Rockets are inching away from maximizing their cap space, though Garcia at least helped the situation from flowing completely negative. Houston still has a lot of flexibility, though, and a Jeremy Lin trade could be the next shoe to drop. If that happens, maybe that means the Rockets are willing to lose Parsons and/or Daniels.

They’re on the clock to figure that out – essentially what it would take to land a star – before Parsons and Daniels are ready to get paid.


What the Hawks should do when the lockout ends

Chicago Bulls v Atlanta Hawks - Game Six
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Last season: Same old, same old? Progress and a step back? Stumbling backwards into success? There’s got to be some sort of ridiculous phrase to describe the Hawks’ 2011 season. Their offense took a serious step back, despite all the talk of getting out of Mike Woodson’s system. Larry Drew took over, and the Hawks plummeted from 2nd in offensive rating to 2oth. They were an afterthought, a peaceful reminder that there were some teams out there who didn’t have trios of superstars, just trios of very good ones.

Then the playoffs. The Magic, who should have wiped the floor with them. But the Hawks and newly acquired at-the-deadline Kirk Hinrich had different plans. They disrupted, confused, and chortled the Magic’s perimeter attack while telling Dwight Howard, “do what you must, freak.” Howard did, but it wasn’t enough, especially when Jamal Crawford went gonzo. So despite taking a step back in games won, despite looking terrible on offense even in the playoffs, despite no significant improvement on defense, the Hawks made it as far as they have with this core of players.

Go figure.

Then the Bulls came, and despite a good showing, the Hawks exited rather quietly.

Since we last saw the Hawks: The Hawks have nine players left on contract. Jamal Crawford’s gone to seek somwhere more fun to throw up threes without a conscience (and hit them in huge moments I might add). Kirk Hinrich’s entering a contract year. At nine players, the Hawks have $66 million committed in salary. That’s with Jason Collins, Josh Powell, Etan Thomas and Hilton Armstrong all gone in free agency, presumably. Yes, the two words here are “Joe Johnson.”

When the lockout ends, the Hawks need to: All of my answers are implausible. Amnesty Joe Johnson? Give up a huge chunk of your offense and a very underrated defender. Trade Joe Johnson? No takers. Fire Larry Drew? He just took them to the second round semi-promised-land. Feature Al Horford in the offense more? His efficiency would drop with the usage increase. Strap a device that sends an electrical surge through Josh Smith whenever he shoots from further than 12 feet? Illegal in most states.

The Hawks are who they are. The most likely scenario has them ditching Josh Smith to try and get multiple pieces to build around Horford and Johnson, which will then of course coincide with Smith “realizing his potential” on a bigger stage. Clearly Jeff Teague is the future at point guard, which means that Hinrich is a very expensive backup at this point, despite his excellent play in the playoffs (a contender would benefit from adding Hinrich’s defensive experience). They should keep Magnum Rolle because his name’s awesome. Other than that, their options are limited.

Finding an offensive system that works in any capacity should be the top priority. Everything after that can get figured out. But the Hawks better pray that Larry Drew has more than he had last season, because the playoff run felt awfully player-inspired rather than coach-devised.