Tag: Jose Juan Barea

Mavericks apparently had a “players on expiring contracts” issue last year


At the end of the piece we brought you yesterday from the Dallas Morning Newsabout how Dirk Nowitzki’s feeling good, feeling great, ready, ready to celebrate, there was an interesting little stick at the end.

Nowitzki also made it clear that he is in no mood this season to hear about players who are on the last year of their contract or feel like they are headed for another destination in the off-season. That mentality crept into the minds of some players last season.

“We are all professionals, and I expect everyone to play at a high level and give it their best no matter what their contract situation is,” Nowitzki said. “It is an honor to represent the Mavericks and that is how we will approach it.”

via Dirk Nowitzki excited about Mavericks’ overhaul, says knee is good to go | Dallas Mavericks Blog.

So that’s a not-so-subtle shot at former teammates who were running up the whine tab last year trying to get contracts they didn’t end up getting. Jason Terry’s a reasonable suspect here, as he talked quite a bit about where he might go in the offseason, including Miami, something that had to tweak Mark Cuban if he read it. But that would be pretty shocking considering how much Terry was valued in the locker room. Jason Kidd also spoke on record about the situation, but never made any sort of disruptive claims. Whoever was upset last year at least kept it in house.

But you can’t really blame them. The Mavericks had several guys looking for their last payday of their careers. These things do take a toll, especially after watching Cuban let Tyson Chandler and Jose Juan Barea walk just months before.

Well at least it won’t be a problem for a whi… oh, wait. Five players have expiring contracts this season and have eleven players whose contracts expire between now and July 1 of 2014. It’s part of the business. Dirk can hope things will be different and with a different crew, it might be. But as long as Cuban values flexibility (as well he should) this is going to be a side-effect.


J.J. Barea wants to go back to the Mavs

J.J. Barea
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Jose Juan Barea is going to get a lot of offers in free agency. That’s what happens when you’re the spark plug on the championship team. Barea does what he does very well. He manages the offense, hits some shots, and if you lose him for a minute, bam, he’s backdoor and you’ve given up two points.

But the Mavericks want him back, because of his contribution to the championship run, and for his part, Barea says he wants to oblige them… for the right price. From ESPN.com:

During a brief phone conversation Friday with Barea, who is in the Dominican Republic before he returns to Dallas next week, he reiterated that he hopes to again be playing for Dallas and that the ball is in the Mavs court. “I always said thats my first option,” Barea said. “I did my job last year.” He said he is not necessarily chasing the highest offer or a starting job, saying, “I just want what I deserve.”

via J.J. Barea: Ball in Mavs court – Dallas Mavericks Blog – ESPN Dallas.

That’s code for “I’d like the money, thanks.” But maybe not. Maybe the Mavericks will offer something reasonable and he’ll return for the chemistry and a shot at the title again.

But there will be offers. Most notably from the Heat. But surely Barea will pull in more than the mid-level, which is the Heat’s only real option for a signing, and they also need a wing like Shane Battier, and a center. The bigger issue may be that Barea’s likely not worth a very large offer. He’s higher in this class based off of his performance in the playoffs, but he’s still a criminally small guard who can only play off the bench. His story is a great one, coming from the D-League and Puerto Rico and winning the Finals as a huge component for the Mavericks.

You just have to be careful. After all, we just had the lockout and all.

As Dirk dominates, Barea exemplifies strength of the Mavericks

J.J. Barea

Right about now, the Oklahoma City Thunder can probably identify with Andrew Bynum.

Don’t get me wrong, Dirk Nowitzki was unquestionably the story in the Mavericks’ Game 1 Western Conference finals victory over the Thunder. While other national outlets were busy talking up the greatness of Derrick Rose during Dallas’ well-earned,  eight-day layoff after the team swept the two-time defending champion Lakers out of these playoffs, Nowitzki reappeared with an historic performance: 48 points on just 15 shots, and an NBA postseason record 24 made free throws without a miss.

As great as Nowitzki was, however, the scoring spark provided off the Mavericks’ bench was just as important to the team’s getting it done in Game 1. And J.J. Barea’s play exemplified the distinct advantage that Dallas has in this series, and has had the entire postseason thus far.

Simply put, the Mavericks have too many weapons.

Behind 24 points from Jason Terry and another 21 from Barea, the Mavericks’ bench outscored their Thunder counterparts 53-22. While we’re used to Terry’s scoring barrage off the pine, Barea can be hit or miss. But boy did he hit in the previous series against the Lakers, and he was equally deadly in Tuesday night’s series opener against OKC.

In his first stint in the first half, Barea had a quick nine points in just over nine minutes. But the real damage came in the fourth quarter, when the diminutive reserve took the game over for a brief stretch, and helped his team build the lead to a point of no return.

When Barea checked in 30 seconds into the final period, Dallas held a nine-point lead. He then proceeded to score his team’s next 12 points, pushing the lead to as many as 16 during that run. Barea used his speed to blow by defenders to get into the lane as Dallas spread the floor with its shooters, and he was able to finish at the rim, sometimes in traffic. And just when the defenders started to sag off of him and dare him to shoot from outside after he got to the basket for three consecutive layups, he nailed a 25-foot three-pointer, just because.

The performance from Barea was a microcosm of what teams in the playoffs have been finding out, as Dallas plows through them one by one on its seemingly inevitable march to the Finals. The Mavs are loaded; if Nowitzki doesn’t get you (which is unlikely given the transcendent level at which he’s performed this postseason), then Terry, Barea, or Jason Kidd will.

Bynum’s dirty and ridiculous hit on Barea late in the Lakers’ Game 4, 36-point loss in Dallas — you know, the one that earned him a five-game suspension to start next season, the biggest the league has handed out for an on-court action since the Knicks-Nuggets fight back in 2006 — was completely uncalled for. It was a poor decision in terms of how he wanted to vent the frustration of his season coming to an unexpected end, in no small part thanks to the play of a 5’11” reserve who carved up the Lakers at will for the better part of the series.

Don’t expect any member of the Oklahoma City Thunder to mimic Bynum’s actions at any point in the conference finals, no matter the situation. But just because they can control themselves better than Bynum did doesn’t mean they won’t share those same feelings of frustration.