Tag: Joel Przybilla

Jeff Teague

Report: Jeff Teague signs four-year, $32 million offer sheet with Bucks


The Bucks, led by their new coach Larry Drew (who just happened to be the coach in Atlanta last year), had been going hard at Jeff Teague, the Hawks’ restricted free agent point guard.

They got their man according to Adrian Wojnarowski and Marc Spears of Yahoo Sports.

Atlanta Hawks restricted free-agent guard Jeff Teague has signed a four-year, $32 million offer sheet with the Milwaukee Bucks, league sources told Yahoo! Sports.

The Hawks have three days to match the offer sheet or Teague will rejoin his old Hawks coach, Larry Drew, in Milwaukee.

There are some reports out of Milwaukee the offer sheet will be signed Thursday morning. The three-day clock starts when he signs the paper.

The Hawks and Bucks had spent days discussing sign-and-trade scenarios around Teague and Monta Ellis, or possibly Brandon Jennings. Nothing came of those and with Jennings signing an offer sheet a sign-and-trade is now off the table. The Bucks may need to renounce the rights to Joel Przybilla to make the math work.

This seems to spell the end of Jennings with the Bucks (unless the Hawks match the offer to Teague). Jennings had been a restricted free agent who reportedly wanted $12 million a year for four years from the Bucks, who balked at a smaller offer. The Bucks still have the rights to Jennings and could match an offer, if one comes in, but it’s not likely if they get Teague.

If you think Teague is a downgrade from Jennings, you haven’t watched a lot of them.

Jennings is certainly the more explosive and athletic player, but he doesn’t use that quickness to get into the lane as much as you would think and when he does he doesn’t finish well (Jennings shot just 43.1 percent in the paint last season). Teague seems to constantly be thinking not just reacting, so he can be hesitant and that can get him in trouble. But he assisted on a higher percentage of his teammates shots — Teague assisted on 36 percent of his teammates buckets while he was on the floor, Jennings 29 (Monta Ellis may have been a factor in Jenning’s numbers). Both guards are solid but not spectacular from three.

Teague is not a great defender, he’s pedestrian, but at least he tries. That puts him well ahead of Jennings.

There is not a ton of room between the two right now, but Teague is showing improvement while Jennings just seems to happily continue to live on bad shot choices. If a team thinks they can change that Jennings has the higher ceiling, but I’d lean Teague right now because I can see his improvement.

Andre Iguodala a riskier free agent than meets the eye

Phoenix Suns v Denver Nuggets

Which of these players would you have most liked on your team last season: Andres Nocioni, Baron Davis, Brendan Haywood, Charlie Bell, Chris Mihm, Corey Maggette, Damien Wilkins, Earl Watson, Elton Brand, Fred Jones, Hedo Turkoglu, Joel Przybilla, John Salmons, Lamar Odom, Mehmet Okur, Metta World Peace, Michael Redd, Rashard Lewis, Rasual Butler, Ricky Davis, Ronald Murray, Stromile Swift, Tracy McGrady, Trenton Hassell or Walter Herrmann?

It’s hardly an inspiring list. World Peace was an alright starter for the Lakers. Brand took a lesser role with the Mavericks, and though his production slipped from previous years, it was still pretty good. Lamar Odom fit in well as a Clippers backup. Otherwise, the list is comprised of bit players or guys out of the NBA.

But all those players have something in common. They were 29 years old during the 2008-09 season. Four years later, they’re not nearly as appealing.

It’s a lesson to keep in mind as teams pursue Andre Iguodala, who opted out of the final year of a contract that would have paid him more than $16 million in order to seek a long-term deal.

Iguodala is an excellent defender and great in transition, two skills that typically don’t age well. He’s a good passer and a passable shooter, so it’s unlikely he’ll completely fall off the map, but any team pursuing him won’t be doing it for his passing and shooting.

A larger sample provides a reasonable expectation for Iguodala. Between the 1999-00 and 2008-09 seasons, 274 players have played a season at 29 years old. Here’s how their production, as measured by win shares, progressed from their 29-year-old seasons into the four following (adjusting for the lockout shortened 2011-12 season):


If Iguodala declines at the same rate – and the cracks already began to show last season, when his win-share total fell to 5.6 – his production will mirror, in order, the 2012-13 production of Tony Allen then Corey Brewer then Wayne Ellington then Evan Turner during the next four years. These aren’t stylistic comparisons, just using current players to set a comparison in production only.

Of course, this method for determining expected value includes players who fell out of the NBA counting as zero, but that’s intentional. Quite often, players can no longer play at an NBA level as they get into their 30s. We see the players like Steve Nash who defy age and remember them, forgetting about players like Chris Mihm who fall by the wayside. That inaccurately shifts our perception of how big a deal age is in the NBA.

I don’t expect Iguodala to fall out of the league before his next contract ends, even if it lasts four years, because he’d be beginning the deal with a higher starting point. But the relative decline of lesser players still informs an expected track for Iguodala.

Iguodala has plenty of value, and a team looking to win right now might knowingly accept the risk of his contract becoming an albatross just to get his immediate production. But teams should enter long-term negotiations with that risk in mind.

Joel Przybilla suspended one game for throwing the ball at a referee (VIDEO)

Joel Przybilla

Joel Przybilla of the Milwaukee Bucks has been suspended one game without pay for throwing the ball and hitting a referee, the league announced via official release.

The incident, which can be seen in the video clip above, occurred with 1:36 remaining in Milwaukee’s blowout 111-85 loss at the hands of the Clippers on Dec. 15.

Przybilla definitely didn’t get his money’s worth with this one.

A casual toss of the ball to the ref while his back was turned is generally not worthy of a suspension. However, at the end of a lopsided contest like this, it’s impossible to know how many interactions Przybilla had with the officials beforehand that may have affected not only the baseline official’s decision to whistle him for the technical foul, but the league’s decision to issue the suspension, as well.

Przybilla will be out for his team’s next game, when the Bucks host the Pacers this Tuesday.

NBA Season Preview: Milwaukee Bucks

Milwaukee Bucks' Ersan Ilyasova   goes up for a shot against Toronto Raptors' Alan Anderson during the second half of their NBA basketball game in Milwaukee Wisconsin

Last season: Abort the mission! New plan! New plan!

The Bucks slammed on the parking brake, wrenched the wheel and Tokyo Drifted in a new direction last season, abandoning the “all defense all the time” team built around Andrew Bogut and giving up on the fleeting hope Bogut will ever, ever be healthy. They swapped him to Golden State for Monta Ellis and Ekpe Udoh, getting a promising young big man with great advanced metrics and, you know, Monta Ellis.

The results were mixed. They almost made it into the playoffs before their wheels exploded and flew off into the Wisconsin countryside, and while their defense didn’t capitulate with Ellis, their offense continued to run into the gutter.

They limped their way out of a playoff spot and entered the offseason with a huge number of questions about their head coach, front office, and the direction of the franchise.

Key Departures: The Bucks kind of surprisingly traded Jon Leuer, after he’d had a pretty solid year. They also traded Shaun Livingston, who, again, was pretty good last year. They let Carlos Delfino go after hemming and hawing over his contract for three months.

Key Additions: When the Bucks drafted John Henson, it was largely a perplexing move. Another athletic big man with questionable post skills? Really? Really? That’s what you thought you should pull off the pile?

But then Summer League came and Henson showed off a better mid-range jumper than expected and a good ability to flow in the offense. He has great court awareness to go with all that athleticism and could see significant playing time.

They elected to trade for Samuel Dalembert, pushing Udoh, who honestly needs the minutes, to the bench and giving them approximately all of the big men, ever. They added Joel Przybilla just in case the other 1,700 of them fail out, and-re-signed Ersan Ilyasova for the offensive repertoire.

Doron Lamb was quietly a very good second round pickup.

Three keys to the Bucks season:
1) Solving the riddle wrapped in a puzzle disguised as a mystery covered in subterfuge that is Monta Ellis and Brandon Jennings. The two are just too similar. Ball-dominant, low-playmaking, moderate-efficiency volume scorers who didn’t develop an immediate chemistry. Sometimes these things can work themselves out, but in a lot of cases, it’s evident from the start if it’s going to work. If this thing doesn’t get solved and start to work by January, it might be time to start thinking about another move in another direction. The two were -1.9 on the floor together last year, giving up 107.7 points per 100 possessions. That is not good. They can’t just raise the 105 offensive rating, they have to get the defense sorted out. The Bucks could be looking at a situation not dissimilar to what the Knicks face with Amar’e Stoudemire and Carmelo Anthony.

2) Get the young guys to make some noise. Ekpe Udoh and John Henson need to become the Milwuakee version of Gibson and Asik. Or maybe the more athletic version of that. Either way, they need to make an impact, because the Bucks can’t look at their long-term build as involving Sam Dalembert. Doron Lamb needs to add some value as a shooter. Tobias Harris needs to come up. They need some big jumps from the project guys.

3) Avoid the Skiles Effect. When Skiles takes over a team, there’s a clock that starts. It’s a countdown to when the team tunes him out. It’s happened in his previous stops, and it very well could happen again. If Skiles can manage to massage, not render, the best out of this team, they could very well be a playoff team. But if he loses them, the season, the roster, his job and John Hammond’s will likely be over in Milwaukee.

How it likely works out: I want to belive in Milwaukee. They deserve it, honestly, they do. They’ve had more than their fair share of bad luck and still haven’t been horrible over the past decade. We blame luck on a lot of the awful franchises, but the Bucks have somehow managed to deal with Michael Redd and Andrew Bogut’s injuries and still float within range of the last playoff spot.

And this team has talent. And it’s got a lot of good efficient things going for it. But it needs so many players to make such huge jumps and for Jennings-Ellis to magically solve itself. That simply may not be possible.

I loathe this, but it really looks like another 9th spot in the East year for the Bucks.

Prediction: 40-42. Is there any better representation of “almost… but not quite?”

Joel Przybilla agrees to terms with Milwaukee Bucks

Portland Trail Blazers v Houston Rockets, Game 6

The Bucks have themselves a backup center.

Veteran center Joel Przybilla has agreed to terms with the Milwaukee Bucks for next season, his agent told Gery Woelfel of the Journal Times.

“We’re excited about this,” Bill Duffy, Przybilla’s agent, said in a telephone interview Monday night. “Joel had a great meeting last week with John Hammond, Scott Skiles and Jeff Weltman and they told him that he not only would bring great value on the court, but that he could help them with his leadership and stability.

“We think it’s a perfect fit.”

Samuel Dalembert will be the starting center for the Bucks, behind him is the young Ekpe Udoh and they can use Drew Gooden or Larry Sanders at the five if they want to go small. Which is to say, Przybilla is not going to get a lot of minutes (not that his legs could handle it) and mostly he is there in the Crash Davis mentor role.

Przybilla also had offers from Portland and Dallas.