Tag: Joe Johnson

Atlanta Hawks v Brooklyn Nets- Game Three

Nets with beautiful basketball sequence to end first quarter of Game 3 vs. Hawks (VIDEO)

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NEW YORK — The Nets played inspired basketball during the first quarter of their critical Game 3 matchup with the Hawks, and this sequence epitomized that somewhat perfectly.

Deron Williams and Jarrett Jack both made great efforts to save the ball inbounds, and once they got to the other end of the floor, Jack and Joe Johnson worked together on a beautiful give-and-go, before Jack found Brook Lopez for the two-handed slam.

Brooklyn led 31-16 after the game’s first 1 minutes.

[Video via The Brooklyn Game]

Deron Williams misses open game-tying jumper late in Nets’ loss (video)

Brooklyn Nets v Atlanta Hawks - Game Two

Maybe Paul Pierce was right.

Deron Williams had a chance to hit the game-tying shot in the final seconds of tonight’s Hawks-Nets Game 2, but he missed the open jumper, and Atlanta escaped with a 96-91 victory.

I don’t want overreact to just one shot, but Williams looked like a shell of himself throughout the game while scoring just two points on 1-for-7 shooting. (To be fair, he also had 10 rebounds and eight assists. He also helped get himself open with a pump fake, but Joe Johnson’s pass did the heavy lifting on the play.)

Nets pull away in fourth to beat Magic, put pressure on Pacers for final playoff slot

Orlando Magic v Brooklyn Nets

Wednesday night was supposed to be easy for Brooklyn: They were the desperate playing for their playoff lives, and Brooklyn was facing an Orlando team that was just waiting to make tee times. Besides, the Magic weren’t very good anyway (the Nets had 12 more wins coming in).

It wasn’t easy.

With just more than 9 minutes left in the game Orlando led 82-81.

But the Nets responded with a 17-4 run at that point and pulled away in the fourth quarter behind a career-high 28 points from rookie Bojan Bogdanovic.

The win puts the pressure on Indiana, which has to beat Memphis to secure the eighth and final playoff seed in the East. If not, Brooklyn will be back in the postseason thanks to this victory.

Former Net now Wizard Paul Pierce questioned the toughness of Brooklyn veterans such as Deron Williams (10 points, 7 assists) and Joe Johnson (16 points on 15 shots), it was the European rookie who was key. Bogdanovic hit 12-of-17 shots, was 4-of-8 from three and was a +19 on the night.

Those veterans made plays, too, and the Nets played some defense when it mattered. Once the Magic took that 82-81 lead in the fourth, they didn’t score another point for 4:43. Meanwhile Johnson hit a running jumper; Williams got to the bucket for a layup, then Johnson hit a couple jumpers, one a three, and the Nets has pulled away.

You can say the Nets should have more than 38 wins with their league-high payroll of more than $88 million ($7 million more than second-place Cleveland), but they will take the playoff ticket if they can get it.

Paul Pierce: Nets’ veterans had poor attitudes, Deron Williams couldn’t handle that stage

Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce

The Brooklyn Nets were opening up Barclays Center and owner Mikhail Prokhorov opened up his checkbook and told GM Billy King to go buy him a winner. Prokhorov wanted a team that could open that building.

But the 44-38 Nets never lived up to that hype. They weren’t bad, but they were bounced in the second round by the Miami Heat. This season the Nets need help just to make the playoffs.

What went wrong? The players there weren’t committed, wouldn’t make the effort needed to win, according to Paul Pierce.

Pierce had clearly reached the “I don’t give a s— what people think” stage of his career (there’s an open seat next to Kobe Bryant) and was brutally honest about what he saw in Brooklyn last season in an interview with great Jackie MacMullan for ESPN.com.

“It was just the guys’ attitudes there. It wasn’t like we were surrounded by a bunch of young guys. They were vets who didn’t want to play and didn’t want to practice. I was looking around saying, ‘What’s this?’ Kevin (Garnett) and I had to pick them up every day in practice.

“If me and Kevin weren’t there, that team would have folded up. That team would have packed it in. We kept them going each and every day.”

He said the problem started at the point guard spot with Deron Williams:

“Before I got there, I looked at Deron as an MVP candidate,” Pierce said. “But I felt once we got there, that’s not what he wanted to be. He just didn’t want that.

“I think a lot of the pressure got to him sometimes. This was his first time in the national spotlight. The media in Utah is not the same as the media in New York, so that can wear on some people. I think it really affected him.”

Pierce said Joe Johnson mostly just wanted to be left alone; he wasn’t a leader either.

What Pierce said on the record is what a lot of people around Brooklyn said off of it the last couple years. The Truth was speaking the truth. The Nets didn’t want to re-sign Pierce, who instead signed in Washington.

To be fair, Pierce and KG were not exactly their vintage selves in Brooklyn either.

You could see what Pierce said about Brooklyn’s effort and passion play out this year as well. The Nets battled injuries but struck fear in nobody really. It took a motivated Brook Lopez — right before he could be a free agent and get paid. But I’m sure that’s a coincidence.

Pierce has plenty to say about other players as well — John Wall and Bradley Beal, Rajon Rondo, and others. This is a must-read piece that the league will be talking about for days.


Nets no longer control their playoff destiny after loss to Bulls

Joe Johnson, Mike Dunleavy, Pau Gasol

NEW YORK — Heading into Monday night’s home contest against the Bulls, the Nets sat in eighth place in the Eastern Conference standings, and were fully in control of their playoff destiny with two games remaining in the regular season.

After a disappointing performance in which Brooklyn was shredded 113-86 by a very good Chicago team, that is no longer the case.

“It was a disappointing loss, but the way I look at it, we have one more game left,” Nets head coach Lionel Hollins said afterward. “We have to win it. And the other teams have to win, too.

“Indiana has to win — if we win Wednesday and they don’t win both games, we’re still in. So that’s the way I’m looking at it.”

That’s the optimistic view, one that Hollins and the rest of the Nets are now forced to take. Brooklyn trails Indiana by a game in the loss column, so if the Pacers can manage to win their last two — at home against Washington Tuesday, and then at Memphis on Wednesday — the Nets will miss the postseason.

This was the second game in less than 48 hours where Brooklyn was blown out in the second half. After losing in Milwaukee on Sunday afternoon by 23 points, the effort at home against Chicago was just as discouraging. Hollins gave credit to his opponents’ strong defense, however, and essentially said that a loss, no matter how it comes, is simply a loss.

“It doesn’t really matter how you lose,” Hollins said. “It could have been a last-second shot; it still would have been a loss. It’s disappointing to lose like that, but we played two really good defensive teams, two athletic teams, two long teams. When you go in and shoot 20-for-50 in the paint, that means they have something to do with that, as well.”

In the Nets locker room, the players seemed to be taking the loss a bit harder than their head coach.

“I honestly can’t explain it,” said a dejected Joe Johnson, when asked about the way the team has dropped its last two games. “I don’t even know how it’s possible.”

Perhaps more telling of where the Nets are right now was Johnson’s answer to a question about whether or not the team has the mental toughness to be able to rebound from these two consecutive dismal performances.

“I have no idea,” he said. “I can’t answer that.”

Hollins is a veteran, both as a player and as a head coach, so perhaps his words about being shut down by two good defensive teams, as well as the fact that the Pacers need to win out for the Nets to be eliminated can be taken to heart by his players before a home game against the Magic on the final night of the regular season.

But on this night, many of the guys seemed to be coming to the sobering realization that an opportunity may have been lost.

“All we can do is just take care of that one game,” Deron Williams said. “It’s our fault. We put ourselves in this position.”