Tag: Jerry Buss


Jerry Buss’ son Jesse arrested for intoxication


Phil Jackson’s not around for questions about whether he’ll return and training camp hasn’t opened yet, but you know it’s NBA season when there’s drama surrounding the Lakers’ front office. Son of Lakers owner Jerry Buss Jesse Buss was arrested for intoxication Friday in Lexington, Kentucky. WDRB in Lexington reports:

Lexington Jail officials say Buss has bonded out of jail.Lexington Police were called to the area of South Broadway and W. Maxwell Street around 3:39 Friday morning for a report of a man laying on the ground.

Thats where officials say Buss was picked up and charged.

Sources tell WDRB he was demanding preferential treatment and told officers he was the son of Jerry Buss.

via Son of L.A. Lakers owner arrested in Lexington – WDRB 41 Louisville – News, Weather, Sports Community.

To be fair, when I get sleepy, I lay down, too. Maybe not in the middle of the street (anymore), but still. Oh, and you pulled the “Do you know who I am?” routine, Jesse? Not cool. Also, to answer your question, no, we do not, nor do the fine men of the Lexington police department. Buss’ father Jerry Buss was arrested for DU in 2007.

Look, I think yo have to ask if planking was somehow involved in this situation. Or maybe that’s what planking really is. The sober equivalent of getting drunk and randomly laying down.

(Mugshot courtesy of WDRB’s Tamara Evans)

Lakers, Mavericks, other big spenders safe for two years

Image (1) jbuss-thumb-250x140-15577.jpg for post 3061

Part of the reason we lost 480 NBA games this season is because a bunch of owners were pissed at the Lakers, Mavericks, Heat, Celtics and other owners willing to spend over the luxury tax. Small market owners wanted to tie the hands of the big spenders in the name of the mythical “competitive balance.”

They got their wish… but not right away.

The most punitive measures for big spending teams don’t kick in until year three of this labor deal, reports Ken Berger at CBSSports.com. So spend away, Buss family, you’ve got a couple more seasons before a bill comes due.

Luxury tax rates: The same dollar-for-dollar as in the previous CBA for the first two years. Starting in Year 3, the rates increase to $1.50 for the first $5 million over; $1.75 for $5-$10 million over; $2.50 for $10-$15 million over; $3.25 for $15-$25 million over; and an additional 50 cents for each additional $5 million (same as previous proposal).

Repeater Tax: A dollar-for-dollar additional tax for teams that are above the tax line for a fourth time in five years (same as previous proposal).

That means the tax is the same for two seasons and the repeater tax can’t hit a team until 2015 at the earliest. These are delayed bills that give today’s big spenders a chance to reduce salary — except they are all are already in a pretty good spot in a couple years.

To use the Lakers as an example, they currently have only $61 million on the books by the time the higher taxes kick in ($30 million of that goes to Kobe Bryant and $19.2 million to Pau Gasol). The Lakers will have time to bring their payroll to whatever level they deem reasonable (which will still be over the tax, just likely not in the $90 million range anymore).

Even the Heat, with their current big three and others roster, are at $71 million for the season the tax rates jump. They, too, will spend more but have time to prepare. That or ship Chris Bosh out.

In the short term none of these teams will not have as large a mid-level exception as others, but that is about the only new restriction on them for now. For the next couple years, it’s business as usual for the spenders.

NBA teams put in stiff luxury tax penalties… which luxury-tax payers will still benefit from

Jerry Buss

Wait, what?

From Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:

The luxury-tax “cliff” experienced by tax teams, by which they felt the full brunt of going slightly over the tax level by losing all the tax money they would’ve received had they stayed under, also was addressed in the owners’ proposal. The league offered that such teams would receive half the tax money squandered by going from being a tax receiver to a tax payer.

via Talks blow up with ultimatum, Wednesday deadline – CBSSports.com.

So just so we’re clear on this. You’re the small-market owners. And you’re threatening to detonate professional basketball in the United States if you don’t get more financial help. And you’re creating an acrimonious atmosphere with the players that essentially amounts to legalized extortion. And giving them ultimatums and threats. And yet the system you’ve supported which creates stiffer penalties for going into the luxury-tax… is still going to give them half the collective money back?

To clear this up, if the Knicks send an exorbitant amount of money, they pay the tax amount into a pool that is redistributed to the teams, with the tax-paying teams essentially getting a rebate.

I’m not going to crunch the numbers because I suck at it, but basically, the Knicks will still earn money from the luxury tax pool, despite being tax payers. The fact that the tax they will likely spend will far exceed the amount they get back isn’t the point. It’s that giveback that makes it easier to swallow. If you’re a small-market owner, couldn’t you find the financial gap between where the union and league are, almost entirely in the amount you’re going to be surrendering to the luxury-tax-paying teams, who again, chose to spend that much?

It’s maddening. But then, it’s teams looking out for themselves. They want to keep their options open, so that if they draft a Tim Duncan, they can spend around him to compete and keep him, while also easing the burden on themselves. As always, as we’ve seen in these negotiations, the league wants the players to make up the whole difference, while giving themselves all the breaks they can handle, thereby extending the flawed system.

Funny way of doing business.

Shaw’s account of leaving L.A. should make Lakers fans nervous

Phil Jackson, Brian Shaw

Kobe Bryant and most Lakers fans may not have liked it, but Brian Shaw never really stood a chance to become the Lakers next head coach. Shaw was qualified, and a top Lakers assistant, but his candidacy was doomed because he implied more of the same and Jim Buss wanted to put his stamp on the organization. Mike Brown was a radical departure, that’s what the powers that be wanted.

It’s not a bad thing — Mike Brown can coach. This team can win with him.

However, the vibe around the change and how it all went down should make Lakers fans nervous about the future.

Shaw said that even within the Lakers organization he needed to distance himself from Jackson — the guy who won the franchise five rings — to have a better chance to get the job. It’s old issues and family dynamics that could hurt the franchise in the future. That was the core of Shaw’s message when he opened up to Sports Illustrated’s Ian Thompson

“Phil let me know going into the interview [with the Lakers] for me to almost disassociate myself from him, that anything that I said about him or the triangle system would hurt me because of his lack of relationship with Jimmy Buss,” Shaw said. “So when I did interview, that was the point that I tried to make about the fact that I had played for Phil only my last four years, and that I played for all of these other coaches.”

“There were some things that were said that I won’t really get into,” Shaw said. “It was kind of bashing Phil Jackson, that I just refused to just sit and listen to. And that’s when I said, ‘Hey, I love Phil Jackson. I appreciate everything that we’ve all been able to accomplish under him. We’ve all prospered since he’s been the coach here….

“It was more from Jimmy Buss just doubting some of the decisions he made in terms of how he was handling and running the team and coaching the team on the sidelines, and sitting down instead of getting up. People look at coaches and want them to pace up and down the sidelines and bark instructions to the guys. That’s not Phil’s demeanor. That was viewed as a negative in my estimation — but it won him five championships with the Lakers and six with the Bulls, and that was his coaching style when he won, so why was that not acceptable now?”

How much Jackson yelled at the officials was a concern? Really?

Understand the dynamic at play here. The first time Phil Jackson left the Lakers, it was Jim Buss who had pushed hard for Rudy Tomjanovich to take over as coach. That backfired and was a disaster that left Frank Hamblen — a smart man who was not suited for the big chair — in charge. Combine that with the unpopular trade of Shaquille O’Neal before that season and you pissed off Lakers season ticket holders. Really pissed off. The Lakers held a season ticket holders meeting during that season and sent Mitch Kupchak out as the sacrificial lamb, when neither the Shaq trade nor the Rudy T. hire were his call.

Then Jeanie Buss — the business smart daughter of Jerry who is well respected by other NBA owners because she gets it — rides to the rescue bringing back boyfriend Phil Jackson. It was an expensive pill but bringing him back calmed season ticket holders down. It was worth the money. Eventually, it led to two more rings.

But he was not Jim Buss’ guy. So when it came time to make a change Jim put his stamp on the organization. Not only is Jackson gone, Shaw never had a chance. But it goes deeper than that — 25-year Laker and assistant GM Ronnie Lester is gone. Rudy Garciduenas, the equipment manager since the Showtime era, is gone. Scouts are gone. Anyone considered a Jackson guy is gone.

Loyalty and tradition seemed to be gone, too. That’s what should make Lakers fans nervous. The disrespect of all things Phil Jackson — a guy who won the franchise five rings and made the Buss family much more rich — should make Lakers fans nervous.

I’m undecided on Jim Buss right now. The son of longtime owner Jerry Buss he has made some good calls we know of. For example, pushing to draft Andrew Bynum. But there are other questions now if the young Buss can be the steady hand that his father was. Jerry Buss was good at letting the basketball people make most of the basketball decisions and only stepping in on the biggest issues. Can Jim do that?

Hard to say, but if the franchise is going to continue it’s run of success, it comes down to Buss making mature decisions. And after the Shaw incident, Lakers fans should be a little nervous wondering if that will happen.

Can we blame the Lakers television deal for the lockout?

Los Angeles Lakers v Regal FC Barcelona

There is plenty of blame to go around for why we are still sitting here with an NBA lockout going on and the regular season postponed.

David Stern, Billy Hunter, Kevin Garnett, Paul Allen, Derek Fisher, Robert Saver and Bennett Salvatore are all to blame. Oh, wait, not Salvatore. I just blame him for everything wrong with the NBA out of habit. My bad.

But now we can add another to the blame list — Jerry Buss and the Lakers new massive television deal. Brian Windhorst of ESPN passes along this tidbit.

When the Lakers agreed to a new local television deal worth several billion dollars last winter, it only further united their small-market competition in pressing for a makeover of both the revenue-sharing system and the split with the players.

“That Lakers’ TV deal scared the hell out of everybody,” one league official said. “Everyone thought there is no way to compete with that. Then everyone started thinking that it wasn’t fair that they didn’t have to share it with the teams they’re playing against.”

And here we are now, with the owners holding the hard line.

The other owners realized that the Lakers are raking in the cash, that the Celtics are about to do the same with a new deal with Comcast.

Those small market owners wanted a chunk of that money — make no mistake, this whole lockout is about cash — but they cleverly phrased it as “competitive balance.” They say it’s not about the money, it’s about a chance to compete.

If they want to compete, they need to draft well and make smart decisions with their contracts. The Raptors had a larger payroll than the Heat last season, money alone is not the answer.

So the small market owners started driving the bus, demanding major givebacks from the players and a bigger share of revenue sharing from the larger market teams. Those larger market teams don’t want to cut into their profits, so they say, “fine with the revenue sharing, but all that money we send out has to be new revenue we get in from this labor deal.”

And suddenly you have big-market owners coming in as hardliners, too.

And suddenly you are approaching Nov. 1 — the day the season was supposed to start — and you have no labor deal. You have a lockout. You have a lot of greedy people looking foolish.

Yet, here we are.