Tag: Jeff Van Gundy

Phil Jackson

Plenty of big names available to be Lakers next coach. Here’s a list.


When the Lakers take the court Friday night to take on the banged up Golden State Warriors, Bernie Bickerstaff will coach the Los Angeles Lakers.

Who will coach the team in a couple of weeks is a different question entirely.

The Lakers have fired Mike Brown — when Kobe gives you a death stare it is a DEATH STARE. The Lakers have said they are making a big, national search — which means they are spending to bring in a big name (they just bought out four years of Mike Brown). Before they decide who they hire the Lakers management needs to decide what kind of team they are going to be going forward, what direction to go. Two years ago when Brown was hired it felt more like the Lakers defining themselves as who they were not going to be — they were not Phil Jackson and the triangle. His presence was purged from the organization on several levels.

Here’s a quick list of guys the Lakers could get:

Mike D’Antoni: Lots of Lakers fans asking for him, I don’t think he gets it. On the plus side, he has a great relationship with both Steve Nash and Kobe Bryant (remember Kobe grew up in Italy when D’Antoni was a star player over there). He brings a fun and entertaining style of basketball. Although, we can seriously debate whether this roster, outside of Steve Nash, is suited to play D’Antoni’s up-tempo style. This is an old and slow Lakers team. We saw in New York how things went for him with a roster poorly suited to his needs. Also, his teams never even reached the NBA finals, thanks to Robert Horry’s hip.

Most importantly, there is this from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports and the NBC Sports Network:

Brian Shaw: This is the guy the Lakers players wanted to replace Phil Jackson, and it would have made sense if the Lakers wanted continuity. But Jim Buss wanted to go another direction, to put his stamp on the organization. Shaw is currently a Pacers assistant coach and after interviewing him and saying no so they could hire Brown, would Lakers management really admit that was a mistake and hire Shaw now? Plus, Shaw has never been a head coach and you’re going to hand him the keys to this car and it’s high-powered engine?

Jerry Sloan: The old-school, hard-a** long-time coach of the Jazz would bring some discipline and accountability to a Lakers roster that seemed to be lacking it. He loves the pick-and-roll and the Lakers have the personnel to kill with that play. But Sloan is not young, had trouble getting along with a star player in Utah (Deron Williams) and brings a flex offense that also can take a while to learn. The guy can win, he is loyal, but does he fit with management and the players?

Nate McMillan: The former Sonics and Blazers coach is well-respected by players if not Portland ownership. His teams were notoriously slow paced, which certainly would give the Lakers a style to stick with. However no team of his ever finished in the top half of the league in defensive efficiency (points allowed per possession). Could he do better with Dwight Howard in the mix?

Stan Van Gundy: Um… no. He’s a fantastic coach, but did you watch him and Howard in Orlando and how that went down?

Jeff Van Gundy: His teams always defended hard but were not offensively creative or entertaining (as the Lakers prefer). Plus he seems happy broadcasting, making this a long shot. Still, I love the idea of seeing Jeff Van Gundy grabbing on to Dwight Howard’s leg during an on-court fight just for old time’s sake.

Flip Saunders: Don’t laugh — yes he struggled in Washington but he has won with veteran teams. Not a guy that brings a big presence and structure, he’s more easy going and a players’ coach. A long shot.

Phil Jackson: I know a lot of Lakers fans want to see this happen, but I can’t picture it. For a few reasons. First, when he left more than a year and a half ago, you got the sense he was done with being on the sidelines. He was done with the grind of coaching — long hours, lots of travel, too many short hotel beds and massive egos around. Does he really want to coach again.

The bigger issue is that Jim Buss desperately wanted to put his own stamp on the franchise after Jackson left. It wasn’t just him a lot of people — people who had been with the Lakers for many years — were let go (with the impending lockout used as the excuse). In even a bigger way than bringing back Shaw, bringing back Jackson would be to admit a mistake. I’m not sure Lakers management does that even if Jackson wanted to return. Which he may or may not, he can’t exactly coach via Skype from Montana.

That said, at his press conference Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak said Jackson is “not coaching you’d be negligent not to be aware” and at least consider it.

Jeff Van Gundy confirms it was NBA who kept his brother off air

Denver Nuggets v Los Angeles Lakers

Stan Van Gundy came right out and said the reason he is not one of the studio hosts for ESPN’s NBA Countdown studio show (the one that wraps around their game broadcasts on ESPN and ABC) was that David Stern and the NBA shut him out.

His brother Jeff Van Gundy — the lead analyst on ESPN’s broadcasts — basically confirmed that. And rightfully said it left him with journalistic questions.

From JVG’s interview with the USA Today (hat tip to SLAM).

Jeff, who hadn’t previously spoken publicly on the issue until an interview with USA TODAY Sports, says his brother “had a basic agreement” to become an ESPN/ABC analyst in the marquee studio shows that wrap around game coverage: “And then something changed. There’s certainly circumstantial evidence that something from the outside — presumably the NBA — changed (ESPN’s) thinking. … I was happy when they came to an agreement and shocked when they pulled their offer.”

ESPN eventually put together a foursome of Jalen Rose, Bill Simmons, Magic Johnson and Michael Wilbon. While I would have liked SVG on the show, that lineup should be an improvement over what they had last year.

As an analyst who gets paid to be critical at times of the league, Jeff called what the league did a “shot across the bow.”

Jeff’s big picture: “This is an organization that’s treated me great. But this raises interesting questions about what a (league-network) partnership means. You have to realize, as a fan, you’re not getting the whole truth. … It seems like there are certain people in each sport that (TV) can’t criticize, or you can’t criticize the league itself. That’s what impressed me when (ESPN’s) Mike Tirico and Jon Gruden criticized the NFL over replacement refs. That (Commissioner) Roger Goodell didn’t throw a hissy fit at ESPN was impressive.”

Leagues can be very controlling by their nature. They want to spin things the same way the Barack Obama and Mitt Romney camps want to spin things. And in the case of the leagues, they have some leverage with the networks that broadcast their games because those rights come up for renewal.

All it means is that you need to be an educated media consumer in today’s market. There is no perfect, unbiased source of information on anything. Your job as a consumer of media is to understand that, notice the patters and see through it where you need to.

And that includes NBA broadcasts.

Thunder will probably re-sign Scott Brooks… but if not, JVG and Phil are on the list

Scott Brooks

You know, for a guy who just won his conference, Scott Brooks can’t really get much respect. OK, he gets a lot of respect. But probably not as much as he deserves.

Brooks is of course without a contract extension, a free agent after June 30th, despite having just navigated a team so young it needs a parent to see films with the naughty bits to the NBA Finals. ESPN reports that Brooks and his agent are looking for a deal “north of $4 million per year” which puts him in line with what Tom Thibodeau reportedly wants. So what if the Thunder won’t pay it? What if they won’t go for the number of years, as ESPN reports is the hold-up?

ESPN also reports the Thunder have some, shall we say, back-up plans:

The reality is that Brooks and his bosses, after months of talks, don’t have a deal … and time is running out. And sources say that the Thunder, just to be safe, have started brainstorming in-house about whom they plan to pursue should negotiations with Brooks collapse. Two names, according to sources, that have come up in those discussions: ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and, yes, 11-ringed coaching free agent Phil Jackson.

You’d still be wise to expect an extension for Brooks in the near future.

via Thunder’s next challenge: Brooks’ contract – TrueHoop Blog – ESPN.

Those are some back-up plans. It’s likely that those names have been tossed out to try and drive down Brooks’ price. That’s the most likely scenario, that this is a bunch of smoke and mirrors in negotiation. But either one represents an interesting choice. Van Gundy is a bit of a worrier so that would be a radical departure, but his defensive schemes would do wonders in an area the Thunder need help. He brings credibility in a big way. But would he mess with the chemistry? You have to wonder if so many years away broadcasting have mellowed the former Knicks and Rockets coach.

Jackson… is a bit more complicated. Any deal with Jackson comes with ties to personnel control. And limitations on how much time he’ll be spending. And is Jackson really going to trek it to Oklahoma City that regularly, considering he’s already hanging out in remote Montana? The conservative nature of the Sooner State is likely an impact as well, it doesn’t exactly vibe with Jackson’s general outlook.

But Jackson’s reportedly been waiting on another “opportunity” and this would be a big one.

But, no. Brooks will be re-signed, because you don’t let the guy who took you to within three wins (or a couple of calls) of an NBA title walk away. Not when chemistry has been such a big contributing factor for the club, and not when the franchise ultra-star has the man’s back. It’s just not done.

But if Brooks is gone…

Tuesday And-1 links: Learn about the Van Gundy brothers

Boston Celtics v Orlando Magic, Game 2
1 Comment

Here is our daily look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT).

Tonight (Tuesday), HBO’s Real Sports will profile the Van Gundy brothers — broadcaster (and former coach Jeff) and current Magic coach Stan. They talk about growing up in a basketball house, coaching against each other, and more. Sure, you have to watch Bryant Gumbel, but it’s worth it. It airs at 10 ET (and a whole bunch of other times during the week).

To help the Miami Heat point guards learn all the team’s plays, coach Erik Spoelstra has given them quarterback-like wristbands. Yes, we are serious.

Boston should follow the model of the Dallas Mavericks as they retool, suggests our own Ira Winderman.

Denver has the deepest bench in the league, which is one of the key reasons they are winning this season. (Notice in here that George Karl uses a plus/minus system to look at five man lineups.)

Taking a closer look at the Knicks offense, with the OG blogger Mike Kurylo.

Byron Scott is no fan of Kyrie Irving’s defense.

Roy Hibbert’s post fundamentals are very solid.

Monta Ellis is frustrated he doesn’t get more calls when he drives the lane.

Another good list of guys underperforming so far this season.

Amid his knee injury and four games off, Dirk Nowitzki admits he probably shouldn’t have played for Germany in EuroBasket this summer. Especially since they went 0-3 and didn’t even qualify for the pre-Olympic, last chance qualifier tourney.

Stephen Jackson says he is just fine coming off the bench.

Ray Allen sprained his ankle trying to get around a screen from the Wizards’ Jan Vesely, the said after the game the was Vesely extends his screens “seemed like a train wreck waiting to happen.”

The Dwight Howard to the Knicks for Amar’e Stoudemire trade rumors are pretty preposterous.

Jerry Colangelo, head of USA Basketball, talks about the challenge of cutting the Team USA group down to 12 and how good this team will be.

Cult hero Brian Scalabrine talks.

Andray Blatche gets booed less on the road.

If you missed it over the weekend, here’s a Q&A with David Stern and the Orlando Sentinel, where he talks about how he is good with player movement. Lakers fans just rolled their eyes.

Knicks bring back Jeremy Lin and Jerome James from the D-League. Lin dropped a triple-double down there.

Along those same lines, the Cavaliers recalled swingman Christian Eyenga from the D-League.

In case you wanted more after seeing a snippet of Kenny Smith’s daughter’s new music video on Inside the NBA on TNT, here is the link to the full thing.

Jeff Van Gundy warns you: It won’t be pretty come Dec. 25

Denver Nuggets v Los Angeles Lakers

It’s going to be sloppy. There are going to be missed passes and non-existent defensive rotations. There are offensive sets that will fall apart into isolation basketball.

No summer workouts followed by a condensed training camp with just two preseason games is just not enough time to make things run smoothly.

Don’t take my word for it, listen to former coach and current ESPN analyst Jeff Van Gundy, who coached the Knicks during the 1999 lockout and talked about it on KTAR in Phoenix with Doug and Wolf (via Sports Radio Interviews).

“Well I think just like we saw in 1999, I think initially you’re gonna see a product that is not what you’re accustomed to seeing. I think Greg Popovich with the Spurs always says this with his team, you can’t skip steps in your preparation for a game or within a game and it’s the same thing now. What we’re basically asking players to do is skip steps and still be good because most every team now uses the summer extensively and then in September they use that month as a pre-training camp and the month of October is 28 days of practice and eight preseason games. There’s a build-up of chemistry, conditioning, system, and all those things that need to be installed and the repetitions needed to be good. Now we’re saying in two weeks we’re gonna cram in four months and then go at it. Anybody who is surprised that the play will not be high quality I think is just kidding themselves on what they need to do to be playing at your best in a highly competitive game.”

Things will get better as the season wears on. But this is going to be the kind of season that players love and coaches hate — lots of games and not a lot of time for practices. It’s an advantage (especially early) for teams that have had their core together in the same system for a while.

By the way, if you want to read how Van Gundy isn’t exactly sure what is going on with LeBron James, read the rest of the interview.