Tag: Jeff Green

David Griffin

PBT Awards: Executive of the Year


Though none of us have a ballot for the NBA’s official awards, we’ll be presenting our choices and making our cases this week for each major honor.

Kurt Helin

1. David Griffin, Cleveland Cavaliers

2. Bob Myers, Golden State Warriors

3. Mike Budenholzer (Danny Ferry), Atlanta Hawks

It’s not for getting LeBron James last summer; LeBron decided that. It’s not for the Kevin Love/Andrew Wiggins trade; LeBron pushed to make that happen, too. No, it was for the smart mid-season change of
course to get Timofey Mozgov and J.R. Smith in while sending Dion Waiters out. That and not panicking with David Blatt.

Officially the Hawks submitted Budenholzer — the acting GM — for this award, but Ferry deserves credit here, too. Even Budenholzer recently said it was Ferry, currently suspended, who constructed most of the East’s top team.

Brett Pollakoff

1. David Griffin, Cleveland Cavaliers

2. Mike Budenholzer (Danny Ferry), Atlanta Hawks

3. Danny Ainge, Boston Celtics

While Griffin may not have had much to do with the Cavaliers landing LeBron James or Kevin Love, bringing in Timofey Mozgov, Iman Shumpert and J.R. Smith (while jettisoning Dion Waiters at the same time) makes him worthy of the honor. It was tempting to consider the Hawks for the top spot, but Dan Feldman laid out a pretty solid case of why it wouldn’t be appropriate, no matter what moves may have been made by those in Atlanta’s front office.

Sean Highkin

1. David Griffin, Cleveland Cavaliers

2. Danny Ferry, Atlanta Hawks

3. Danny Ainge, Boston Celtics

Yes, your job is a lot easier when you’re gifted LeBron James and Kevin Love in the offseason. But Griffin deserves a lot of credit for the Iman Shumpert/J.R. Smith/Timofey Mozgov trades in January that filled every need the Cavs had and were the catalyst for their transformation into the team to beat in the East.

I realize that Ferry wasn’t officially on the ballot, and that was just about the only thing the Hawks could do given the circumstances around his leave of absence. But Ferry’s done a phenomenal job since taking over the Hawks, and this was the best season in franchise history.

Ainge did a good job collecting assets, picking up a potential long-term piece in Isaiah Thomas, and getting decent value for Rajon Rondo and Jeff Green.

Dan Feldman

1. David Griffin, Cleveland Cavaliers

2. Bob Myers, Golden State Warriors

3. Danny Ainge, Boston Celtics

Of course, LeBron James is primarily responsible for transforming the Cavaliers, and hometown pride guided his decision. But he was not leaving the Heat for Cleveland under just any circumstances. Credit Griffin for making the Cavaliers appealing enough and creating the necessary cap space to lure LeBron. From there, Griffin did right to cash in assets to maximize Cleveland’s chances of winning now. Timofey Mozgov, Iman Shumpert and J.R. Smith have rounded out the roster, and getting a first rounder for Dion Waiters was impressive. The verdict is still out on the Kevin Love-Andrew Wiggins trade, but Griffin had the right idea.

On that same front, Myers gets most credit for the trade he didn’t make – Klay Thompson for Kevin Love. Myers did most of his heavy-lifting with the roster in previous years, but keeping the group together was a decision, just like breaking it up would have been a decision. This year, the Warriors hired Steve Kerr and surrounded him with excellent assistant coaches – building a collaborative culture that really works. Myers is the front-office face of it.

Ainge successfully tore down the Celtics, probably getting the best haul of draft picks as possible in the process. Rajon Rondo, Jeff Green and Brandan Wright (who was acquired for Rondo) were the prominent outgoing players this year, but Ainge even got a pick for Austin Rivers. Ainge also wisely reversed course somewhat when Boston stayed in the playoff hunt and Isaiah Thomas became available for good value. Best of all, Ainge has created an environment where Brad Stevens has the resources and support to successfully make the college-to-NBA jump.

Gar Forman (signing Pau Gasol and Nikola Mirotic), Daryl Morey (plenty of mid-level roster tinkering after striking out on star free agents) and John Hammond (acquiring a first-round pick for taking quality contributor Jared Dudley, getting along well enough with Jason Kidd) also drew consideration.

Vince Carter, stardom behind him, still proud, still contributing in NBA at age 38

Vince Carter

BOSTON – Vince Carter is explaining why he signed with the Grizzlies last summer, and he cites the vague “opportunity.”

Opportunity to win his first championship? Opportunity to play?

“To play,” Carter says. “I didn’t have anybody else wanting me.”

Did he think he could play more in Memphis than anywhere else?

At this point, Carter can tell I’m not getting it.

“I didn’t have anybody else who wanted me,” he says.

Dumbfounded, I ask why – after his successful season with the Mavericks – teams wouldn’t line up to offer a minimum contract.

“So why would I get a minimum contract?” Carter said. “…I didn’t think I played that bad.

“I don’t think I played bad enough to even entertain it.”

Carter has made plenty of concessions since his heyday – but only as many as necessary.

Eight years after his last All-Star appearance and 11 years since he last led the league in All-Star votes, Carter is still in the NBA.

His numbers, including 16.4 minutes and 5.9 points per game, are mostly career lows. But  at age 38, Carter seems happy.

And why shouldn’t he be?

He’s the fourth-oldest player in the NBA behind only Andre Miller, Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett. Carter loves basketball, and he’s continuing to play it – on his terms, which is just fine for Memphis.

“He doesn’t take advantage of any of his celebrity as far as big-timing people or anything like that,” Grizzlies coach Dave Joerger said. “He’s one of the nicest, down-to-earth guys. He loves coming to the gym every day. He loves working with younger guys, older guys, sitting around after practice, after games, just talking hoops. He’s the kind of guy who doesn’t have to do that, right? He’s set, and he’s had a great career, and hopefully, he goes to the Hall of Fame. But he just love it.”

Carter indicates he set his parameters – salary and not wanting to join a rebuilding team – last offseason and then let his agent handle the rest. So, though teams might have offered a minimum contract, he didn’t consider those viable offers.

Memphis came through with a three-year, $12,264,057 contract (though just $2 million of the final season is guaranteed). That makes Carter the only of the NBA’s 10-oldest players with a contract that runs through 2017:


The league’s 11th-oldest player, Dirk Nowitzki, also has a three-year contract.

Carter says he’s taking it year to year, but he hopes to at least finish this deal before retiring.

“I still have the love and the desire to play, and my body feels good,” Carter said. “So, god willing.”

Carter, an eight-time All-Star, is one season from claiming a record all to himself.

Among players with at least five All-Star selections, Carter is tied with Grant Hill and Bob McAdoo for most seasons since the last All-Star appearance (eight). It’s rare for five-time All-Stars to hang on so long after they begin to fall off. Here’s how many All-Star-less seasons every five-time All-Star has played since his last All-Star season:


Carter has made a second career as a 3-and-D specialist, someone who spots up offensively and gets to the right spots defensively.

His shooting percentage has fallen this season, though he’s shooting 38 percent from beyond the arc in 17 games since a foot injury. His defense has slipped with his athleticism since even last season, but he has fared much better when playing with Memphis’ top players – Marc Gasol, Zach Randolph, Mike Conley, Jeff Green, Courtney Lee and Tony Allen – rather than other reserves.

Simply, don’t ask too much of Carter and he can still deliver.

Carter shifted to this limited role during three seasons in Dallas. Was the adjustment easy?

“No,” Carter said. “It’s never easy.

“That first year of marriage, it’s tough. It’s the same thing. It’s just patience, patience. I have some patience, too.”

Carter also has plenty of knowledge. He studies the game more than ever, and he enjoys sharing his wisdom with his Memphis teammates.

At times, though, he has worried he’s overstepping his bounds. He might have perspective like a coach, but he’s not a coach, and he doesn’t want to step on the staff’s toes.

Told of Joerger’s glowing endorsement, Carter looks relieved.

“They just trust what I say, and other guys trust me, too,” Carter said. “I guess I’ve been around long enough.”

Jeff Green dunk absolutely destroys Wizards’ Kevin Seraphin (VIDEO)

Jeff Green, Marc Gasol

That is just nasty.

Memphis’ wing Jeff Green got his man to bite (badly) on the pump fake, attacked the rim and while Washington’s Kevin Seraphin had slid his big body over but it didn’t matter. Green just flew over him and threw down the dunk. All while making a serious dunkface.

Green later left the game with back spasms and despite this play Washington went on to pick up a key win in their fight to get home court in the first round of the playoffs. The Grizzlies loss also opens the door for the Rockets in the battle for the two seed in the West.