Tag: Jazz Nuggets

NBA Playoffs: Nene's injury should be the final straw for Denver

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The irony of Nene’s potentially season-ending knee injury is unmistakable: Carmelo Anthony asked for help from his teammates, and fate responded by taking one away. It’s pretty horrible news for a Denver team just now starting to pull things together offensively (and for a talented player like Nene who has been around this block once or twice), especially considering the team’s rotation alternatives. The Nuggets will be forced to rely on Chris Andersen and Johan Petro to hold down the middle on defense and provide some scoring, neither of which seems a particularly likely result.

Then again, stranger things have happened in this series. After the Jazz lost Mehmet Okur for the season (and much more) due to a ruptured Achilles tendon, they appeared to be paper-thin in the middle. The unpolished Kyrylo Fesenko was deemed Okur’s replacement in the starting lineup, and it was assumed that Utah’s season was well on its way toward an unfortunate conclusion. The Jazz had already survived an injury to Andrei Kirilenko to keep things competitive early in the series, and the loss of the one proven center on the roster looked to be too big of a setback for Utah to overcome.

That obviously hasn’t been the case. The Jazz didn’t miss a beat with Okur sidelined, and Fesenko turned out to be far more competent than anyone imagined. He’s not contributing a ton in the box score, but Fes is giving Utah quality minutes in a jam, which is well more than most expected of him.

The same result is technically a possibility for the Nuggets, and hell, maybe Petro will have a game to remember on Friday. It’s just not very likely. Denver still hasn’t figured out how to stop Utah’s offense, and replacing a capable defender — at least in theory — like Nene with a block-chaser like Chris Andersen and a Johan Petro like Johan Petro doesn’t bode well for the Nuggets’ ability to stop anyone.

It’s not that Fesenko is in any way a superior player to Andersen or even Petro, for that matter. Denver just doesn’t have any time or possessions to spare. Every second of basketball the Nuggets play in this series will be laced with the threat of elimination. A few more missteps and that’s all for Denver, which puts the Nuggets’ bigs in a particularly tough situation.

Last night’s win does offer some hope for the Nuggets, if only because productive scoring nights from Chauncey Billups (21 points), Kenyon Martin (18), J.R. Smith (17), and Arron Afflalo (12) proved that if nothing else, Denver can still outscore Utah on some nights. Chris Andersen even played a fine game (10 points, seven rebounds)  in Nene’s absence. But the series precedent tells us that those are exceptions to the standard. Those are notable performances because of each of those players has struggled (relatively) in this series, and it took all of them clicking offensively to secure a must-win affair.

To expect the same over the final game(s) of the series is to ignore the significance of the first four contests, which showcased the brilliance of Deron Williams and Utah’s ability to execute above all else. Combine those series-long trends with Nene’s unfortunate injury, and and Game 5 seems to be a brief respite from Denver’s turmoil rather than the beginning of their salvation. 

NBA Playoffs: Nene leaves game, appears to be done for season

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UPDATE 8:28 am: Sources told the Denver Post after the game that it looks as if Nene is done for the season. He will undergo an MRI today to confirm, but doctors with the Nuggets thought he tore the ACL in his left knee.

12:21 am: An inadvertent kick from Carlos Boozer has knocked Denver starting center Nene out of gave five in Denver.

According to Mark Spears at Yahoo, Nene is done for the night and will be evaluated tomorrow.

The injury happened in the second quarter. Boozer was leaping up to battle for a rebound as Nene came flying in to crash the boards. When he leapt forward Boozer had one leg kick out behind him, accidentally right into the knee of Nene just as he had started to plant for his jump. The inadvertent kick caused the injury.

It’s another injury to the banged up front line of Denver, which has not dominated the more-banged-up front line of Utah as has been expected.

NBA Playoffs: Nuggets limited by defensive execution, but also offensive scheme

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anthony_ref.jpgThere’s no question that Denver’s inability to play defense is a big reason why they find themselves on the brink of elimination, but TrueHoop’s Kevin Arnovitz has discovered something of an oddity in the Nuggets’ deliberately inefficient offense:

The Denver Nuggets have a secret arsenal of nearly unstoppable plays. There’s only one hitch headed into Game 5:
Acting head coach Adrian Dantley isn’t sure he can get his team to run them.

That’s because the Nuggets see themselves as a certain kind of
basketball team with an anti-system. Mike D’Antoni has
7-seconds-or-less. Phil Jackson has The Triangle. Jerry Sloan has The
Flex. And Dantley has inherited from George Karl what he’s referred to
more than once as “random basketball.”

What does “random basketball” mean? That’s Dantley’s description of
how the Nuggets perceive themselves offensively — a team that
flourishes by pounding you with dominant one-on-one play in the half
court and with breakneck transition buckets. Dantley isn’t the only one
to make that general characterization. When asked about the Nuggets’
woeful assist total of 13 following Game 4, Chauncey Billups conceded,
“We aren’t really a high-assist team. That’s not how our offense is

A stubborn devotion to “random basketball” is one of the reasons
Denver’s offense has fallen off since Game 1, and there’s something
obtuse about the Nuggets’ unwillingness to construct coherent
possessions in the half court against Utah. When the Nuggets choose to
run deliberate sets, they’re shredding the Jazz — particularly on the

Arnovitz goes on to dissect the strengths of the Nuggets’ 3-5 pick-and-roll, making particular note of the effectiveness of Carmely Anthony and Nene in such situations. The most troubling part of Arnovitz’s excellent piece, though, ared the cries from acting head coach/substitute teacher Adrian Dantley, who claims that not only is he aware of how effective the team has been with the pick-and-roll, but has implored his players to run more of them.

Maybe this is where the Nuggets miss George Karl, who if nothing else was a superior coach in his ability to manage and connect with his players. Then again, Karl’s commitment to “random basketball” could be equally zealous and misplaced, leaving Dantley as one of the few guys on the bench left shaking his head after Denver runs another isolation play.

This particular assembly of players in Denver is not an easy one to reach, particularly for a coach with little experience as a showrunner. Even Karl has struggled with the task at times, despite that aspect of coaching being considered his strength; George is first and foremost a manager of personnel and personalities, as opposed to a strict X-and-O type.

So while Dantley’s struggle to reach this team may indeed say something about his prospects as a head coach, it’s hard to read Arnovitz’s account (supposing you take Dantley’s comments at face value) and see Adrian as anything other than the guy in the room that gets it. He may not get the communication aspect of coaching just yet — at least not with this team — but the indications from the top are that Dantley is telling his players the right things, but something lost in translation to the hardwood.