Tag: Jason Kidd

Indiana Pacers v Brooklyn Nets

Report: Nets’ coach Jason Kidd has backing of management


The Brooklyn Nets are a hot mess.

They have key injuries (Deron Williams, Brook Lopez and Andrei Kirilenko, Jason Terry), they have an offense that devolves into isolation plays that are easy to defend, and they have a defense that is without cohesion (especially when Brook Lopez is out). They have lost five in a row and are now 3-10 after a Sunday loss at home to the Pistons.

All of which has people wondering if rookie coach fresh off the hardwood Jason Kidd is in over his head. Could he get canned?

Right now he has the backing of management, reports Marc Stein at ESPN.com.

But sources told ESPN.com that Kidd continues to have the backing of his bosses with Brooklyn dealing with several injuries and other mitigating factors which have contributed to the poor start….

Among the Nets’ initial concerns early in the season, sources confirmed, were some “philosophical differences” between Kidd and lead assistant Lawrence Frank. But sources stressed to ESPN.com that the Nets have been working to smooth out any issues in recent days.

“They’re fine,” one source said of Kidd and Frank.

Fine? Is fine good enough? In a situation like this Kidd needs a confidant and guys he can trust on this staff, he needs everybody pulling the same way on the rope (Stan Van Gundy talked about this in the PBT Podcast).

While there may be Kidd questions, I think he has to get a pass due to the injuries — this team is simply not the same without Brook Lopez. On either end of the floor (he played good defense this season). They also need a healthy Williams to take charge of the offense and start playing at his All-Star level. Those two have to come back, take charge and revert guys like Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett into role players. That is how Brooklyn starts to turn the offense around.

The other factor here — if Nets management decides to let Kidd go, they are admitting their own mistake in hiring an untested coach in a tough situation to begin with. Are they really ready to say they were wrong publically?

Not right now, nor should they. It’s early — as bad as they have been they are just two games out of the eight seed in the East. However, things could change if this downward spiral continues.

While it’s too early to judge Jason Kidd the coach, whispers around league not kind

Brooklyn Nets v Los Angeles Clippers

Jason Kidd was given a Herculean task: Take six current or former All-Stars, a team with a ridiculous $100 million payroll, and meld all of it into a team that can win a title — and by the way, you have pretty much a one-year window to do that.

Hiring Kidd as a coach fresh off his final season as an NBA player may have been the boldest — if you prefer, riskiest — move the Nets front office made last summer. Nobody questions Kidd’s basketball IQ, but understanding how to play the game and teaching others how to do it are very different things.

Brooklyn is off to a 3-7 start with a bottom 10 offense and defense, and after an ugly Monday night loss to the Trail Blazers Nets players called a team meeting to talk about their issues.

But around the league, some people are starting to whisper Kidd is the problem, reports Howard Beck at Bleacher Report.

A veteran scout, interviewed earlier in the day and speaking on the condition of anonymity, called Kidd’s bench comportment “terrible,” observing that the play-calling has fallen mostly to his top assistants, Lawrence Frank and John Welch.

“He doesn’t do anything,” said the scout, who has watched the Nets several times. “He doesn’t make calls. John Welch does all the offense. Lawrence does all the defense. … I don’t know what Kidd does. I don’t think you can grade him and say he’s bad. You can give him an incomplete.”

The same scout said he had counted only 15 plays run by the Nets in the games he has watched.

The Nets’ offense degenerates quickly into isolations — often pure isolations, nobody is even setting picks for one other. There is a lack of leadership, nobody is taking charge of the offense they are trying to be fair and let everyone have turns and the result is ugly.

Would the Nets management admit their mistake and make a move?

It’s far too early to say Kidd can’t do this job, or to count out the Nets (even with their bad record they are just a game out of first place in the weak Atlantic Division). But people are watching and beginning to wonder.

Jason Kidd to agree to plea deal for DWI, league suspension likely to follow

NBA Draft Basketball

Last summer, after he had signed on to play for the Knicks in what turned out to be his final season as a player, Jason Kidd was arrested for driving while intoxicated (DWI) after he crashed his SUV into a tree. Fortunately, nobody was injured.

Now comes time to pay that bill and Kidd is going to own up to what he did — which likely means a suspension by the league will follow.

Kidd will enter his plea to the court Tuesday, reports the New York Daily News after speaking with Kidd’s attorney.

“He will say that the drinks he had that night rendered him intoxicated,” his attorney, Edward Burke Jr., was saying on Monday morning. “What Jason is going to do is stand up and own this.”

About time. Burke, who comes out of Sag Harbor, L.I., and has handled a lot of high-profile cases in his time on the South Fork of eastern Long Island, explained that as part of the plea arrangement with the office of the Suffolk County District Attorney, Kidd has agreed to make school appearances on Long Island in the fall, which will be taped and can be used later as public-service announcements if the DA’s office chooses to use them that way.

Good. Kidd should have a price to pay for getting a DWI.

The league will almost certainly suspend Kidd for the first couple regular season games after the plea is entered. The league has traditionally suspended players a couple of games for DWIs and that is not likely to be different here.

Which means it will probably be the Nets Game 3 when he makes his coaching debut. As Bondy notes, that is a small price to pay