Tag: International Basketball


Rockets rookie Parsons signs with French team

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Marc Spears of Yahoo! Sports has the story:

Rockets rookie F @ChandlerParsonsagrees to contract with France Cholet with an NBA out as early as Oct. 3, agent Mark Bartelstien tells Y!.

The 6-10 Florida alum was taken by the Rockets with the 38th overall pick in the draft, and was named the SEC player of the year in his final season with the Gators. Parsons’ versatility for a big man should make him a good fit overseas, but I’m sure the Rockets would like to see him practicing with their team the instant the lockout gets resolved.

Bargnani and Gallinari central figures in mini arms race between Italian clubs

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If the Pau Gasol trade proved anything it’s that the owners and operators of basketball teams are, occasionally to a fault, reactionary thinkers. Once the dominoes begin falling, some GMs just can’t help themselves, and before they know it they’ve traded a successful offensive system and a versatile two-way player for an aging Shaquille O’Neal. Or more recently: they’ve liquidated half of their roster for the sake of getting another star to put alongside Amar’e Stoudemire, in no small part due to the glut of talent collected by another team in the conference.

The same reactionary patterns seem to hold true in Lega Basket A, Italy’s top league, with both a potential inciting acquisition and a likely reactionary move centered around NBA talent. According to La Gazzetta dello Sport (via Sportando and Yahoo’s Scoop Du Jour blog), Olimpia Milano (also called Emporio Armani Milano), one of the most storied teams in Italian basketball, is considering capitalizing on the lockout by bringing back Danilo Gallinari. That consideration has made the thinking of another Italian club, Montepaschi Siena, even more cut-and-dry; Montepaschi had reportedly already been preparing to make a run at Toronto’s Andrea Bargnani to bolster their roster, but the possibility of another Lega A team securing NBA talent would make that decision even easier. Montepaschi’s interest in signing Bargnani exists independently of whatever else goes on in Lega A, but that interest is intensified should Milano up the ante by inking Gallo.

For now, the two players are teammates, attempting (along with fellow NBAer Marco Belinelli) to power Italy’s national team through EuroBasket’s preliminary rounds. But it should surprise no one if both Bargnani and Gallinari end up as Lega A rivals in short order.

DeJuan Blair may play in Russia, perceived injury risks be damned

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Among the flood of reported signings, flirtations, explorations, and interest between overseas clubs and NBA players, DeJuan Blair’s name and news don’t create much of a ripple. He’s no Deron Williams, after all; Blair isn’t even a steady NBA regular at this point in his career, having squandered some of the opportunity given him as a member of San Antonio’s limited frontcourt. Yet thanks to Blair’s injury history, the news that he may play professionally in Russia (per Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski) has raised a few eyebrows and inspired the internet peanut gallery to take their best collective shot.

The primary risk of international basketball to NBA players is the potential for injury involved. Strange things happen on a basketball court; it’s honestly amazing that serious injuries don’t occur more often with all of the leaping into occupied space that goes on in a competitive game between hyper athletic ballplayers, but those tweaks, sprains, strains, and breaks that do happen are costly nonetheless. Not only does Blair run the risk of a freak injury by playing in Russia, but also the natural wear and tear that comes from a player with no ACLs hitting the non-NBA hardwood. The domestic logic could deem Blair insane; he’s labeled as being injury-prone as it is, and yet he’s likely chosen to spend his time away from the league playing for a team that is not his own while risking serious injury in the process.

Yet injury is an odd reason for Blair or any other player to forgo the chance to play elsewhere during the lockout. The risk of injury/lack of insurance argument can logically apply to NBAers suiting up for their national teams during a typical off-season, but this summer (and now fall) is anything but typical. The void left from a lack of team workouts, training camp, and preseason ball gives players even more incentive to ready their skills in preparation for an NBA campaign that may or may not come. There is no existing schedule or guide for players to ready their bodies for the regular season; negotiations could take a turn on a moment’s notice, and it will be up to Blair and all of his peers to be ready to play professional basketball again, be it in November, in January, or worse.

This decision, should Blair make it, would be a means to that end. Plus, lest we forget, the schedules of foreign leagues aren’t all that different from the NBA’s. Blair will be playing and training, but only in the lack of the playing and training he’d be doing with the Spurs as part of his typical NBA regimen. He — and every other NBA player interested in alternative lockout employment — would be drilling, lifting, or scrimmaging, and all it would take would be the pop of a medicine ball, an awkward fall, or a hard collision to send a training camper to the training room. Basketball is not without its risks, regardless of whether it’s being played in a foreign land or an NBA team’s practice facility. The fact that such an injury would otherwise happen under the watch of an NBA team is functionally irrelevant.

NBA fans have been conditioned to look at extracurricular basketball as an additional risk for NBA players, but let this serve as a reminder that on a normal schedule, American pro ballers would still be putting in work and minutes while risking injury. There’s nothing terribly unique about the risk that Blair runs, while the payoff is rather straightforward. Maintaining good health is crucial for Blair, but so is development, and doesn’t logging floor time — even in another country — make quite a bit of sense at this stage in his career? Particularly when the lockout is depriving him of putting in team-driven developmental time on his home floor?