Tag: Houston Rockets

Rockets come from 19 down late in third to beat Clippers 119-107, force Game 7


This is the greatest collapse in Clipper history. Which is saying something.

It’s also one of the greatest and most improbable comebacks in Rocket history.

When Chris Paul made a driving, twisting layup with 2:35 left in the third quarter, the Clippers went ahead 89-70. Los Angeles was in total control and on its way to its first-ever Conference Finals.

But from that point on the Clippers shot 5-of-27 (18.5 percent) including missing 14 shots in a row near the end of the game. They missed layups and open threes, shots they want and normally hit. Meanwhile the Rockets — using an unlikely lineup without James Harden — were 8-of-13 from three alone in that stretch, and outscored the Clippers 49-18 to close out the game. Corey Brewer had 15 points, and Josh Smith had 14 in the fourth quarter and was the defacto point guard, both guys hitting shots the Clippers would normally just let them take — but they found the bottom of the net.

The Clippers went into their prevent defense while the Rockets played with the desperation of a team that did not want its season to end.

The result was a furious comeback and a 119-107 Rockets win that forces a Game 7 Sunday in Houston.

“We never stopped believing,” Dwight Howard said after his 20 point, 21 rebound performance, where he played the entire second half. “Our faith was tested all night, as it has been all series, but we kept it together.”

“We were trying to run the clock out, and we stopped playing, and they kept playing,” Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. “Once it got to eight you can just feel it…

“We missed wide open threes, layups, dunks. With each miss I felt the pressure mounted.”

Down 19 Kevin McHale went to a more defensive lineup, with Smith and Brewer on the court, with Dwight Howard in the paint, while Harden got rest. It wasn’t meant to be a long-term rotation, but it worked. Surprisingly, that lineup put up points — 40 in the fourth quarter — and won the game.

“They outplayed in every sense of the word down the stretch,” said Blake Griffin, who had 28 points on the night. “We took our foot off the gas, stopped defending, a lot of things.”

“We gave this one away, there’s no doubt about that,” Rivers said. “But it’s still 3-3, there’s still a Game 7.”

The question is can he get his Clipper charges mentally up for that game after a painful let down on Thursday night.

The game started well for Los Angeles. The Clippers started out on an 8-2 run, their defense was the key as they were getting stops. But they could not pull away from the Rockets, and then in the second quarter Houston stuck right with LA. They put up points, James Harden did a good job of attacking before the defense was fully set, and he was getting to the line. It was 64-62 Clippers at the half, in 24 minutes that didn’t see a lot of defense.

But the third quarter was all Clippers.

The Rockets shot 25 percent overall and were 1-of-8 from three in the quarter. James Harden shot 1-of-7. The Clippers played their best defense of the game and were getting stops then running off them. Meanwhile, Chris Paul had a dozen points, and the Clippers pulled away and led by as many as 19.

Then the fourth quarter happened.

And the Rockets season stays alive.

The end of the game was a perfect storm of the Clippers getting tight and missing makeable shots, while the Rockets hit shots they don’t normally hit — if Josh Smith wants to take a step-back three you let him. But of course on this night he drained it. Meanwhile Griffin — the best player so far in all the playoffs — missed three layups in a row at one point, one of them blocked by Howard.

This gives the Rockets a lot of momentum heading home, but the Clippers are already Game 7 tested these playoffs.

Things are going to be very interesting Sunday in Houston.

Report: ‘Not enough support’ among GMs to change ‘Hack-a-Shaq’ rule

Houston Rockets v Los Angeles Clippers - Game Four

Adam Silver has said he’s on the fence about whether or not the league should look to change the rules surrounding intentional fouls away from the ball — also known as the Hack-a-Shaq strategy — that sends dismal free throw shooters to the line on purpose.

From a strategy standpoint, it can seem to make sense.

From an aesthetic standpoint, it’s brutal to watch.

The NBA is an entertainment product above all else, so removing the least entertaining portion of the game would seem to be in the league’s best interest. But while an earlier report placed the odds of the league making such a change at 85 percent, the latest version seems to indicate that team executives aren’t wholeheartedly convinced.

From Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:

At the annual meeting of NBA general managers Wednesday in Chicago, there was no overwhelming consensus to change the rules to discourage teams from intentionally fouling poor free-throw shooters, league sources told CBSSports.com.

“There is not enough support to change it,” one executive in the meeting said. “It’s one of those perception is bigger than reality issues.”

League officials presented data on intentional fouling that strongly suggested the problem is an isolated one, despite all the attention it has gotten during the postseason. According to the data shared with GMs at the meeting, 76 percent of the intentional fouls this season — regular season and playoffs — have been committed against five players: DeAndre Jordan, Dwight Howard, Josh Smith, Joey Dorsey and Andre Drummond.

Jordan, the Clippers’ center who has been hacked into the next century through the first two rounds of the playoffs, has accounted for about half of all intentional fouls this season, according to the league data.

The statistics presented are what likely killed the desire to make a change more than anything else.

If such a small percentage of players are the ones victimized by the strategy the vast majority of the time, then it would seem to be a smaller problem than most have made it out to be. But because two of those players are currently facing each other in a high-profile seven-game series in the second round of the playoffs, it can make for some extremely ugly basketball, nationally-televised all by itself for the NBA-watching world to see.

It’s worth noting that this will still be discussed by the competition committee during its July meeting in Las Vegas, and it may still be recommended that the rules need to be changed. But it’s far from a consensus at this point, at least in the early stages of discussion.

James Harden, Rockets attack paint, beat Clippers to force Game 6

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The Clippers looked like they wanted a break. They have played every other day since April 22 — while other teams have had some healthy rests during the playoffs — and Los Angeles was counting on some time off. All they had to do was close out their series against the Rockets Tuesday, and they would have almost a week off to rest Chris Paul’s hamstring.

Instead, the Clippers started their vacation early, playing like a team that expected their opponent to roll over.

Meanwhile, the Rockets came out and played with desperation and passion. From the start, the Rockets were pounding the ball inside and defending with energy. James Harden was playing like an MVP candidate again.

“We attacked,” Rockets’ coach Kevin McHale said after the game. “We finally, we got to the basket, we got our points in the paint, we tried to attack. We finally played more like we tried to play throughout the year. We finally played downhill.”

The result was a 124-103 Houston win. That makes the series 3-2 Clippers, heading back to Los Angeles for Game 6 Thursday night.

The changes the Clippers need to make are less about Xs and Os and more about attitude, Clippers coach Doc Rivers said.

“They just played harder, they were more focused,” Rivers said. “They played like they were the desperate team, we didn’t play very desperate tonight. So give them credit. I thought they took us out of all our stuff offensively.”

Harden was central to Houston’s attack, putting up 26 points (on 9-of-20 shooting), 11 rebounds, and 10 assists — a playoff triple-double. The Clippers tried to force the ball out of his hands, but he made the right read and hit passes to open guys all night.

All the Rockets were moving the ball and getting it inside, they shot 24-of-30 at the rim on the night and had 32 made shots in the paint on 68 percent shooting. They did a good job of getting the ball inside via the pass, not just dribble penetration. They also got DeAndre Jordan in early foul trouble, which helped open up the paint.

“We’re better when we play inside out, when we play downhill and attack,” McHale said. “We’re one of the better teams in the league at points in the paint and we just weren’t doing it.”

The Rockets came out as you’d expect from a team facing elimination, with the best energy and offense we had seen all series. Josh Smith was moved into the starting lineup in an effort to improve ball movement, and it worked. That said Clippers started 4-of-18 shooting and still were hanging around. The Rockets did a good job of getting the ball inside, they had 20 points in the paint in the first quarter, and Houston closed the quarter on 12-4 run. It was 27-22 Rockets after one.

In the second quarter the Clippers made their run and tied the game up at one point, and you started to wonder if this would turn out like the last couple games. However, the Rockets went on a 9-0 run to take a comfortable lead again before the half. The Rockets grabbed half of their missed shots as an offensive rebounds in the first half, and with the attacking style the Rockets were up 63-48.

This time around the Clippers were the team that could not get stops. Part of that was Jordan getting in foul trouble. With no Jordan to check him, Howard had 20 points and 15 rebounds on the night.

Houston had a much more balanced attack — Trevor Ariza had 22 points, Corey Brewer added 15. It seemed everyone was making plays.

Meanwhile, the Clippers were the two man show. Chris Paul and Blake Griffin combined for 52 points on 56.8 percent shooting. The rest of the Clippers shot 31.8 percent. Part of that was good defense, part of that was Los Angeles just missing shots.

The Rockets played their best game of the series. The question is can they do it on the road in Game 6. Or will we see a more focused Clipper team looking to end the series and get a little rest.