Tag: Heat-Mavs

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

Video: Jason Terry takes over in Game 6


Dirk Nowitzki was having one of those nights. Dallas needed to win Game 7 (they didn’t want to give Miami life) and their star and best scorer couldn’t find his rhythm.

Enter Jason Terry.

The former Sixth Man of the Year came in and started to light it up, hitting everything on his way to 19 first half points (and 27 for the game). Just watch, he had his jumper going and because of that he doesn’t need to get the tattoo of the Larry O’Brien trophy on the inside of his arm removed.

League to review tape of Heat, Mavs altercation

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

The good news is nobody is getting suspended from Game 7.

But the league is going to review the tape from an altercation that started between DeShawn Stevenson and Udonis Haslem in the second quarter. If someone did leave the bench to enter the fray they could face a fine and be suspended at the start of next season (whenever that is).

Here is the statement from the league, courtesy the Associated Press.

“A player will not automatically be suspended for leaving the bench if he has already left the bench because a timeout was called,” league spokesman Tim Frank says in a statement. “However, we need to review the circumstances of this particular incident, which we will do, after the game.”

The incident happened in the second quarter. The Heat had hit a shot as part of a little run and so a timeout was called. Stevenson thought Haslem was in his way as the two went to the bench, they bumped into each other then started facing up and jawing. Pretty soon there was a crowd. Mario Chalmers rushed in as the third person and seemed to escalate things, but he had been in the game.

Anytime a player levees a bench to enter a fight there is an automatic suspension. However, guys were already coning out to the floor so it creates a muddy area.

It wasn’t really that big a deal, nothing anyone should be suspended for really. But you know how the league loves to watch tape on these things.

LeBron has a few arrogant words for those who hate him

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

It seemed like most of America was rooting against LeBron James.

The Decision. The pep rally. The air of arrogance around him and the team coming into the season. It turned people off. A lot of people. Most of America.

When asked after the game (in an interview broadcast on NBA TV) about how it feels to have people rooting against you like that, LeBron sounded… arrogant.

“All the people that were rooting for me to fail… at the end of the day, tomorrow they have to wake up and have the same life that (they had) before they woke up today,” James said. “They got the same personal problems they had today. And I’m going to continue to live the way I want to live and continue to do the things I want to do.”

Yea, that’s going to really win some people over.

LeBron is never going please many of those haters. But calling them jealous was a poor choice, it loses some of the fans on the fence. LeBron has a lengthy list of public relations blunders in the past year, you can now add another one to it.

Dallas won the title, Miami didn’t lose it

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Six

The story was not the Dallas Mavericks and their incredible shooting, it was the Lakers collapse. Then it was how the Thunder were not ready.

Now, it was how the Miami Heat lacked discipline, could not execute at the end of games and how LeBron James faltered.

That’s not what the story should be.

The real story is the Dallas Mavericks are NBA champions because they are the best team. They won it. The Lakers and Thunder and Heat didn’t lose it, Dallas took it from them with better team play, better execution. A lot of us — myself included — were late to appreciating the Mavs and what they were doing, the kind of run they were on, where it would lead. But that’s about us. They believed in what they were doing and kept going forward, getting better with each step.

Going into the season Dallas was considered part of the second tier in the West, part of the great gaggle of teams trying to chase the Lakers down. Then Rodrigue Beaubois injured his foot and missed much of the season, and we thought it robbed them of needed athleticism. Caron Butler blew out his knee and we thought the Mavs were toast without their best perimeter player and a key defender.

More than that, though, we felt like we ha seen this movie before. Dallas wins 50 plus games every year, yet we had been conditioned to expect playoff failure. Why was this year going to be different?

It was.

You can’t just pinpoint one thing that caused the change. Maybe it was a more vocal Dirk Nowitzki, who brought more leadership to go with his incredible game, something Mark Cuban mentioned after Game 6. Maybe it was Tyson Chandler bringing a new defensive attitude to the team. Maybe it was everyone really buying into Rick Carlisle’s system. Maybe it was having a veteran team that understood executing under pressure. Maybe it was Jason Terry and J.J. Barea hitting crazy shot after crazy shot.

Most likely it was all of those things coming together at the same time.

That wasn’t sexy enough for all of us. Dallas wasn’t flash, it was just a lot of good players all pulling on the rope in the same direction, executing game plans. They adjusted — in the first few games of this series the Heat’s quick closeouts seemed to rattle Mavs shooters, but by the end they were used to it and draining all those shots.

Dallas won this series and won the title. Don’t just think Miami lost it — the best team won. The Mavs were smarter on the court, stronger mentally. And they deserve all the spoils coming to them.

Dallas may have won last old-school title for while

APTOPIX NBA Finals Mavericks Heat Basketball

Dallas won it all. They earned it. They get the banner and the rings (if they do rings) and the bragging rights. They earned them.

But everybody wants to be Miami.

Not the fans. Outside of South Florida the Heat the Heat are despised, treated with the same venom usually reserved for politicians who text pictures of their junk to people who are not their wives.

But around the league Miami is the model for the future — everybody wants a trio of superstars. Miami has theirs, but you see the Knicks trying to get their trio (at the cost of all their good role players), same with the Nets, same with a lot of teams trying to jump on that bandwagon. It’s why there is so much interest in what is going to happen with Chris Paul and Dwight Howard — if they opt out in 2012 are they going to team up with? Some may not like this trend (some owners hate the players having that kind of power) but it’s the way the league is moving.

Dallas was a throwback. They just won a ring the old school way. The last one we may see for a while.

They certainly have talent — you don’t win without it. They have one of the best in the game in Dirk Nowitzki. Jason Terry can score on anyone, Jason Kidd is a solid leader, Tyson Chandler the best defensive center in the game.

But this was not a “superstar+superstar+superstar=success” formula. They did it by putting together a team that fit well together. They did it by being well coached. They did it with balance. They took years to bring it all together right, to learn some hard lessons along the way. They did it as a team.

“Guys started to understand if we trusted the system, and executed, because all our guys knew how to play basketball good things would happen,” said Dallas owner Mark Cuban in a postgame interview on NBA TV. “No one was selfish — when the ball needed to move, the ball moved. When someone needed to hit an open shot, they hit an open shot.”

Everybody looked past the Mavericks when the playoffs started because they had a regular season that looked so much like their last ones — 11 years in a row with 50 wins, you just came to expect it and came to expect them to fold in the playoffs. But this Dallas team was tougher than past versions. And while Boston got old and the Lakers fell apart, Dallas kept playing better and better, believing in each other.

There is more than one way to build a great team, more than one way to win a title. Miami will get there. Miami learned that it needs to balance out the roster with better fitting role players. The players saw first hand the level of trust needed for them to take the next step.

But more and more teams are going to build their teams the Miami way. Doing it the way Dallas did it is a long, hard road.

And right now, Cuban would not trade the road he traveled to get there for anything.