Tag: Heat Mavericks Game 2

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Two

When Dallas got hot, Heat made host of bad decisions


Give Dallas credit — this is not their first massive comeback these playoffs. They are in the finals because they executed better at the end of games better than any team in the West. This is a veteran team that does not easily fluster and they started running a fantastic staggered screen for Jason Terry that the Heat could not stop. Dallas has shooters. Dallas has Dirk Nowitzki. Dallas earned this 95-93 Game 2 win with their 22-5 run to close the contest out.

But you don’t have a comeback like this without some help.

Miami helped choke this away down the stretch. As our own John Krolik noted, the Heat had spent a season trying to shake a perception of arrogance, of a team celebrating before they won anything. Then, fair or not, they got it back in six minutes.

What did the Heat do wrong down the stretch? A few things.

• Horrible shot selection. With their 15 point lead, Miami went into the NBA equivalent of the prevent defense — they started trying to milk the clock, so they started their offensive sets late in the shot clock. Well, “sets” is a bad description of it. It was more like run out some clock then let LeBron James or Dwyane Wade make a play in isolation. Chris Bosh took some long jumpers late.

Remember the 55-second, three-chance possession the Heat had starting with 1:37 left in the game? Miami was up two and if that becomes four they regain some control. But what happened? A LeBron contested three from the top of the key, a Heat offensive rebound followed by running the clock down and LeBron taking another contested three, followed by another offensive rebound, but eventually Udonis Haslem gets stripped. That typified what the Heat ran late.

We should note, to be fair, the Heat took a lot of bad shots in the first half and at the end of Game 1 — this is a team that when pressured falls back to isolation “hero-ball.” They just have guys who can get away with it more than they should, but it will kill them in this series if they keep it up.

• Bosh on Nowitzki for the final play. Even Heat coach Erik Spoelstra had some regrets about not going with Udonis Haslem after the game, as reported by the Palm Beach Post.

“Yeah, that’s a tough one,” Spoelstra said. “I know UD probably is really wishing he had that opportunity to defend him. He had gotten a couple over the top, and the end of the game running it all the way down to the clock, could have gone with either guy. Both guys are good defenders.”

• Not fouling/double teaming Dirk Nowitzki on the final play. Miami had a foul to give (meaning they could foul Dirk before he shot and there would be no free throws, just Dallas ball out of bounds). They could have forced Dallas to run an out-of-bounds play with five or six seconds left, an easier play to defend because Dallas would have limited options in that time. But instead, Bosh did not foul, Nowitzki spun to the basket and Haslem never came over to help. Ballgame.

The other option — make someone other than Dallas’ best player beat you. Dallas had fantastic ball movement all night and had made the Heat pay for double teams with open shots. But still, you have to make someone other than one of the best scorers in the game beat you.

The Heat made mental mistake after mental mistake late. Like a team that had thought it had won and exhaled. And you can’t do that against Dallas.

Video: Dirk Nowitzki’s game winner

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Two
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Miami had a 15 point lead in this game because of their defense.

But after they went up 15 they took their foot off the gas when Dallas got focused. You can see it all on this play — Dirk Nowitzki’s game winning shot.

The Heat have a foul to give (Nowitzki said he started his move early expecting the foul) but Chris Bosh never uses it. Udonis Haslem hesitates to come over and is too late when he does. LeBron James does not help off Jason Terry in the corner. And if you make those kind of mistakes against Dirk, you lose.

In the end, Nowitzki made a shot with his “bad” left hand.

Miami’s celebration only issue in mind of Mavericks

Dallas Mavericks v Miami Heat - Game Two

It became the hot topic Thursday night after the Dallas Mavericks evened the NBA finals 1-1 with a 95-93 win in Game 2 — how Miami’s celebration midway through the fourth quarter sparked Dallas’ comeback. If it did. Players were asked about it and it became the hot discussion on twitter.

What you think of the celebration says more about how you feel about the Heat then it does about what actually happened.

What happened is this: With 7:20 left in the game LeBron James led another Heat break, but he passed to Mario Chalmers, who had defenders getting back collapse on him under the basket. So he kicked it out to Dwyane Wade in for a corner three, right over the arms of Jason Terry. The arena erupted. The Heat were up 15 and in control. That felt like a dagger, except we anyone who knows Dallas knew it was too early.

After the shot Wade stood there for a few seconds with his shooting arm extended, then kept it up as he walked past the Dallas bench (a timeout had been called). Then beyond the bench area LeBron James met Wade, said a few words, did a little head bob and fake punched him in the chest a few times, then moved on. That was it.

Frankly, by NBA standards, it was a four on a scale of 10. Watch the video by following this link. DeShawn Stevenson has had bigger celebrations over a made three this series. Forget someone like J.R. Smith.

But that’s not how Dallas saw it. Look at the quote from Tyson Chandler, via Royce Young at CBS Sports Eye on Basketball.

“He celebrated in front of our bench,” Tyson Chandler said. “I think it angered a lot of us. We came out there and responded.”

As you might imagine, Dwyane Wade felt differently.

“A celebration is confetti, champagne bottles. This was no celebration,” he said. “It was a shot made going into a timeout. Every team does something. That’s the game. If it pumped them up — they won the game. Obviously it did something.”

And that’s what is key here — the celebration itself was nothing. Jason Terry’s airplane takeoff has more taunting in it than what Wade did. It’s really about your perception.

If you hate the Heat and are looking for fuel for that fire, have at it. Dallas talk radio is going to eat this up.

What really matters is it fired up some Mavericks players. Although not Dirk Nowitzki, who didn’t see it. What should have fired them up is how they were getting abused at that point, but the celebration touched a nerve. What we should be talking about is how well they played down the stretch, how they changed the series. It’s an insult to the Mavs to talk about this as the spark to the comeback and not the fire they have shown against the Thunder, Lakers and Blazers.

It didn’t play a huge role in one of the most amazing comebacks in NBA finals history, that was more about double screens for Jason Terry that the Heat could not adjust to (a great play call), it was about the Heat trying to kill the clock then running isolation plays with time winding out, it was about shot selection for both teams. It was about the Heat’s defense slowing down as the Mavericks stepped up. It was about heart.

But the celebration, that was nothing, except when it became something in the minds of the Mavericks.