Tag: Heat losing streak

Miami Heat v Los Angeles Lakers

Kobe on how the Lakers, Heat losing streaks are different


Don’t know if you heard, but the Heat have lost five in a row. I think that made the news somewhere.

Just like it did earlier this season when the Lakers lost four in a row. Or three in a row two other times.

Now the Lakers have won 8 in a row heading into Miami. Kobe Bryant said there is a fundamental difference between the Lakers struggles and Heat struggles, as reported by Kevin Ding at the Orange County Register.

“The difference between us is that we all know what our roles are,” Bryant said. “Everything is cemented. They’re still trying to figure that out.”

He’s right. You can question the Lakers execution, their commitment to the regular season, their passion. But even with a few new players the roles on that team are defined. The Lakers have always known who they are.

Miami is clearly still trying to figure out how who they are, especially in crunch time. They are trying to figure out how to get the best looks (although even when they get good looks they just seem to miss). Bosh wants the ball in a different spot on the floor; coach Erik Spoelstra is trying to find ways to get more motion in the half-court offense and more points in the paint. Their issues are more about their identity.

And the point in the season when you are supposed to be ramping up for the playoffs is a bad time to be having team identity issues.

That by no means makes the Lakers prohibitive favorites Thursday — the Heat are a desperate team, and there is nothing more dangerous is pro sports than a team desperate for a win.

Are the Heat dribbling themselves into trouble?

Dwyane Wade, LeBron James, Chris Bosh

By my count today, there are 1,563,459 theories on what is wrong with the Heat, and twice as many stories about said theories.

One of those jumped out at me — the Heat are dribbling too much.

That’s what former Denver Nugget staffer and stats guru (he literally wrote the book), now ESPN staffer (and stats guy) Dean Oliver wrote at TrueHoop — there are a lot of guys pounding the ball and not a lot of guys passing the ball.

Dribble charts show where and how much teams dribble in order to score, and the Heat have a big red area indicating that they dribble to score more than any other team. Miami’s Big Three of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh all dribble to create their own shots, and they all do so in the lane.

It’s great to have guys who can break a defense down off the dribble, but the Big Three seems toneed to do so. At this point, they haven’t shown the ability to work off each other consistently.

In the half-court, the Heat have the lowest rate of assisted layups in the league, and it isn’t close: Only 45 percent of their layups and dunks in the half court are assisted, while the next-worst team is at 54 percent and the league average is about 62 percent. The Celtics have 70 percent of their half-court layups assisted, and the Lakers 69 percent.

Oliver notes that team that can defend the three point line and the rim — Chicago, Boston and San Antonio — have given the Heat fits. (The Lakers have done that well of late also, and they are next up for Miami.)

What the Heat need is Chris Bosh cutting to the basket when his man leaves him to help on the drive. It needs the wing players moving more when their man helps, either to better spots on the arc or diving to the basket. But be a moving target. James and Wade have a history of hitting those guys with passes, Oliver notes.

His advice includes something Miami actually started to last night in Portland, running some pick-and-rolls with LeBron James setting the picks. (It worked pretty well, but the Heat played terrible defense Tuesday and that cost them the game against Portland.)

All the advice comes back to one point — the Heat needs is players to move, the ball to move, and less isolation and dribbling. Which frankly they know, but are they willing to do?

Struggling Heat find better offense but forget to play defense, lose again

Dwyane Wade, LeBron James, Chris Bosh, Miami Heat

Since roughly last July, Heat fans have been asking — for the last week begging — to get LeBron James and Dwyane Wade active in the offense at the same time. They needed that long-promised spark.

Tuesday night — in a game were the Heat clearly were gripping at times and playing their stars big minutes — Miami pulled out a rarely used play that worked very well: the LeBron/Wade pick and roll. Miami used it a number of times and there was some spark to their usually stagnant half-court sets.

The result was a Heat team that shot better than normal (51 percent), had 48 points in the paint, and scored 114.3 points per 100 possessions (4 points above their season average). Wade had 38 points (on 21 shots as he attacked and got to the line 14 times) LeBron had 31 (on 20 shots).

The only problem — the Heat forgot to play defense, too.

The improved motion in the Heat offense paled in comparison to the varied actions of the Portland sets. Sets that the Heat struggled mightily to defend.

The result was a Blazers team that scored 125 points per 100 possessions (22 points above what the Heat normally give up). That led to a 105-96 Portland win.

That’s the Heat’s fifth straight loss, with the Lakers — winners of 8 in a row — up next on Thursday.

Wade and James played well, but Bosh had just seven points on 3-of-11 shooting. After the game a clearly frustrated Bosh said he didn’t like where he was getting the ball, that plays were not called for him to get the rock isolated on the low block where he is most comfortable. And with Wade and LeBron on the roster Bosh is also clearly not comfortable demanding the ball in games. He needs to start. Mario Chalmers added 10 points for the Heat.

The Blazers bench — Gerald Wallace, Brandon Roy and Rudy Fernandez — outscored the Heat bench 41-8. The Heat’s depth remains an issue.

But Miami’s usually stout defense was the biggest problem against Portland. The Blazers had 42 points in the paint and more importantly dominated the Heat on the glass. Portland, with its motion offense, was getting looks it liked where it liked. LaMarcus Aldridge had 26, Gerald Wallace had his best game since the trade from Charlotte with 22, and six Blazers total were in double figures.

Give the Blazers credit, they came out playing more like the team that needed the win. They earned this, the Heat did not completely give it away.

But the Heat are not playing up to potential.

Miami is clearly struggling, and internally freaking out a little. As Wade told NBC’s Ira Winderman earlier, they thought this would be easier. But if that feeling of panic causes them to struggle on defense, this streak of bad play is going to extend out much longer than it needs to.