Tag: Heat defense

Doc Rivers

Video: Doc Rivers says Heat defense was “chippy”


And so the post-game working of the officials has begun.

Below is the post game interview with Doc Rivers where he says the Heat defense was not physical, it was “chippy” and that Miami should have been called for a couple of technicals.

Remember when it was the Celtics that were either chippy or physical on defense (depending on which side you asked)?

Rivers is spot on about one thing — Boston reacted poorly to the style of play. They certainly didn’t react like the veteran team who has the banner and the trips to the finals. They acted like the young team. And that is part of the reason they are down a game.

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Mike Bibby has made Heat’s defense much worse

Memphis Grizzlies v Miami Heat

In Atlanta, there are a lot of Hawks fans nodding their heads.

The Miami Heat’s defense is much worse when Mike Bibby is on the floor.

Not just worse, much worse. Tom Haberstroh crunched the numbers for the Heat Index at ESPN.

When point guard Mike Bibby has been on the floor for the Heat, Miami’s defense has surrendered 15 points per 100 possessions more than when he has sat on the bench. (We use per 100 possessions as the standard to control for potential tempo effects).

That sounds bad, but how damaging is that? Consider this: the difference between the league’s top defense (Chicago) and the league’s worst defense (Cleveland) is 12.5 points per 100 possessions. Do the math, and you find that Bibby’s defensive impact has been about three points wider than that.

With LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the Heat have a couple of athletic and impressive perimeter defenders who can pressure the ball and get to help positions quickly. Few perimeter players can block shots like them. But that’s not how you hide a bad defender on the perimeter, you need a big man who can erase mistakes inside to pull that off well. The Lakers Derek Fisher is not a good defender but their length inside and shot blocking cover his mistakes. The Heat have Joel Anthony but he is not used regularly.

The Heat have had a good defense — fifth best in the NBA this season at 100.4 points per possession. They play a very different defensive style than the Celtics, but it works for them. From the first day Erik Spoelstra made defense the identity of this team.

But Bibby changes that.

But on defense? That’s where things get ugly. For much of the season, the Heat battled the Bulls and the Celtics for the league’s best defense. Now, the Heat have slid in the ranks down to fifth place, separating themselves from the cream of the crop. What’s most interesting is when that slide started: when Bibby came into town. He made his debut Mar. 13 against the Magic when the Heat allowed 99 points on just 89 possessions, translating to a defensive efficiency far above the Heat norm. The next game? The San Antonio Spurs dropped 125 points on the Heat.

So here are the numbers with Bibby in tow. Since that Orlando game (Bibby’s debut), the Heat’s defensive efficiency (points allowed per 100 possessions) has ranked 20th in the league at 106.4, according to data from NBA StatsCube. That’s worse than Cleveland, Minnesota and Sacramento over that stretch. Before that game, the Heat’s defensive efficiency stood at 99.7, one of the very best in the league.

There is what statisticians call “noise” in the numbers, something that Haberstroh admits (for example, Bibby came in when the Heat played their string of playoff bound teams, for one). Also, Bibby’s three-point shooting has boosted the offense when he is on the floor so despite how bad the defense is the Heat still tend to slightly outscore their opponents.

But Mario Chalmers does not have this kind of defense impact. Neither did Carlos Arroyo, the man the Heat sent out to make room for Bibby.

Right now, Bibby’s offense covers the problems. But in a playoff series where teams will work to isolate and exploit him, and to take away his offensive threes, Bibby likely will become a bigger issue for Miami.

Just ask the people in Atlanta.

Miami is a defensive juggernaut. But will it last?


Right now, the Miami Heat are the best defensive team in basketball.

Yes, we know — you have to be careful about what kind of conclusions you draw from a team three games into a season. Small sample size alert. And it also depends on how you count the numbers — Basketball-Reference has them the best at 90.3 points per possession, Hoopdata has them seventh at 92.7.

But nobody who watched the second half of last night’s Miami blowout would argue that the Heat are a defensive power — Orlando shot 7 for 36 in the second half, and Miami converted those misses into transition points. And Miami — with Dwyane Wade and LeBron James — are to be feared in transition.

The question is, can Miami keep it up? The deeper stats at Hoopdata have some conflicting answers.

The Heat are aggressive defensively. Right now the Heat are making defensive plays — getting the steal, blocking the shot, taking the charge. Miami’s defensive play rate of 19.1 per 100 shows the Heat aggression — they are getting the steal or the block basically one-in-five times down the court. That is fourth best in the league.

That translates to fast break points the other way. And remember what we said about the Heat in transition.

The Heat can and almost certainly will keep up this aggressive play. They pride themselves on being aggressive.

But there are other numbers that raise doubts about if they can sustain this level of success.

Right now Miami is letting teams get to the rim — 25.5 shots per game that are layups or dunks, which is ninth most in the league. However, when teams get there they are shooting just 54.9 percent at the rim, fifth lowest percentage in the league.

Usually, teams with big front lines are ones that can both keep teams from shooting at the rim and keep them shooting a low percentage when they get there (teams keeping opponents to a lower shooting percentage at the rim than Miami include the Lakers, Nets and Nuggets, which are long front lines).

It is unlikely Miami keeps those numbers up. Either they will start to keep people away from the rim or teams will start to finish better. And score more points, and limit those fast break opportunities.

By the same count, Miami is forcing teams to take only 15.5 long two-pointers per game, shots from 16 feet out to the arc that are the least efficient in basketball. The Heat are sixth worst in the league right now in that category. It’s hard to be an efficient defense if you don’t force teams into inefficient shots.

But three games in, the Heat are that. We will see if it lasts.