Tag: Hasheem Thabeet

Detroit Pistons Media Day

Pistons waive Hasheem Thabeet


The Pistons signed Aaron Gray to a two-year contract this summer, but the center has been out after suffering a heart episode. Detroit also signed Hasheem Thabeet to an unguaranteed contract to provide another option as a center behind Andre Drummond and Greg Monroe.

Someone who can’t play or Hasheem Thabeet?

Rather than choosing between those unappealing options, the Pistons traded Will Bynum for Joel Anthony. Now, they’re cutting Thabeet loose.

Vincent Goodwill of The Detroit News:

If Thabeet doesn’t catch on somewhere else, he’ll have the shortest NBA career of a top-two pick since Jay Williams, who had a career-ending motorcycle crash after his rookie year. Yes, Darko will have lasted longer in the league than Thabeet.

The Pistons still must waive a player with a guaranteed contract to get under the regular-season roster limit. Tony Mitchell and Gray, if he can’t get healthy, are the most likely candidates.

Detroit’s D-League affiliate, the Grand Rapids Drive, already have Lorenzo Brown’s D-League rights. The Pistons could assign Thabeet, Brian Cook and/or Josh Bostic to Grand Rapids, as well. If those players sign in the D-League, they could play only for the Drive, but any NBA team could sign them.

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 NBA Preview: Oklahoma City Thunder

San Antonio Spurs v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game Three

Last season: Russell Westbrook was out and Kevin Durant stepped up with (or if you prefer, finally showed off) the well rounded, complete game we’ve always expected of him. He earned the league MVP with his carrying of the Thunder to 59 wins. OKC was again strong on both ends, seventh in the league in offensive rating and fifth in defensive rating. Reggie Jackson stepped up as Thabo Sefolosha faded, and Serge Ibaka took another step forward with his game. With Westbrook back to his terrorizing form the Thunder entered the playoffs as title contenders but again they were undone by injury, a calf strain to Ibaka. The Thunder again made it to the conference finals but with Ibaka missing a couple games they could not overcome the eventual champion Spurs.

Signature highlight from last season: It’s almost impossible to chose, this team has so many. I think the best one was Russell Westbrook’s overtime corner three to beat the Warriors:

But if you prefer a Kevin Durant game winner, here he goes basically one-on-five to beat the Hawks:

Offseason moves: For a years now, coach Scott Brooks stuck with certain guys no matter what logic or eyeballs dictated, but a couple of those fallbacks are now gone. Thabo Sefolosha (a regular starter) was allowed to walk in free agency after a down year, while Derek Fisher retired and will coach the Knicks.Last year’s free agent pickup Caron Butler left as well. Oh, and they traded Hasheem Thabeet.

In their place they picked up Anthony Morrow as a free agent as well as Sebastian Telfair, plus they drafted Mitch McGary.

Keys to the Thunder season

Just stay healthy. Of course this is true of every contender, but two years ago it was Westbrook’s knee that ended their real playoff hopes. Last season Ibaka suffered a grade two calf strain in the playoffs that kept him out for a couple weeks, including the start of the series against the powerhouse Spurs. We don’t know how that series turns out if Ibaka’s healthy, but we know if this team can’t keep its big three healthy they can’t get back to the Finals. Not in this loaded Western Conference.

Is there enough around Durat/Westbrook/Ibaka? This is ultimately the question. They have a championship caliber core, but since the James Harden trade they have not been able to get back to the Finals (in part due to that health issue). The question is do they have the right role players in the right system to lift this team up to the Finals and to win a ring?

If the answer is going to be yes, it has to start with Reggie Jackson, who by the end of the playoffs last year had taken Sefolosha’s starting job and this season. He is going to get a lot of time paired with Westbrook in the backcourt and he brings a more dynamic offensive game with him to that role. He can make the Thunder offense that much more dangerous — and it doesn’t hurt this is a contract year for him (he’s a restricted free agent next summer if a contract extension is not reached by Oct. 31).

Another key role player is Steven Adams, who hopefully will supplant Kendrick Perkins this season (Perkins is another one of Brooks’ crutch guys). Adams brings toughness and defense, but more importantly a little better offense than Perkins. Defenses ignore Perkins (the Thunder try to get him going every game by giving him a couple early touches in the post) but Adams is a rim runner and more athletic, a guy defenses have to keep an eye on.

Finally, the Thunder need growth from Jeremy Lamb and Perry Jones III, they will need to play larger roles. Anthony Morrow needs to space the floor. If they can get something from the rookie McGary and the veteran Telfair all the better.

The pieces seem to be there, can Brooks put them in a less-predictable offense that makes the Thunder harder to defend? If so there is no limit to where the Thunder can finish this season.

How do the Thunder deal with Durant’s constant free agency questions? In every city — and especially in Washington, Los Angeles and New York — Kevin Durant is going to get questions about his 2016 free agency. Then reporters will ask the other Thunder players about Kevin Durant’s free agency in two years. Every answer will pretty much get national play. It’s a potential distraction and something the Thunder need to learn to deal with because it is not going away. (Durant doesn’t know what he’s going to do in two summers yet anyway, but staying with the Thunder is still the smartest bet.)

Why you should watch: Have you ever seen Durant and Westbrook play? Go look at the highlights above. This is as entertaining a team as there is in the league, with two of the game’s most dynamic stars leading them. Plus you should watch just to see what Russell Westbrook wears to the arena on any given night.

Prediction: 61-21, which will have them as one of the top two seeds in the West, maybe the top seed. Kevin Durant likely will pick up another MVP award (LeBron now has some real help around him and with that his numbers are likely drop a little, then guys like Chris Paul and Blake Griffin will split the Clipper vote). But what really matters to him and the franchise is getting a ring. If they are relatively healthy, and if the role players have stepped up, the Thunder have a very real shot at that title. They are legit title contenders, the only real problem they face is that there are a couple others of those in the West.

If the Thunder don’t get back to the Finals, Scott Brooks could be the next change the Thunder seriously consider.

Report: Hasheem Thabeet gets training camp invite from Pistons

Hasheem Thabeet

Hasheem Thabeet played in Oklahoma City the past two seasons, but we use the word “played” here very loosely.

The wiry 7’3″ center wasn’t much more than a big body to plug in for some very occasional minutes, and amassed just 27 points and 40 rebounds in total over 23 regular season appearances with the Thunder last year.

You can’t teach size, as the saying goes, and seven-footers will continue to get serious looks from NBA teams until they have proven to be completely useless more than once. Thabeet isn’t quite there yet, and has received the most basic of chances to catch on somewhere else.

From Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

ESPN sources say Pistons are signing Hasheem Thabeet to non-guaranteed deal to give him a shot to make their team in training camp

The Pistons are loaded with size, and have more than 15 players signed to guaranteed contracts for next season. Thabeet doesn’t appear to be someone who should find himself out of the league entirely just yet, but the fit in Detroit doesn’t appear to be a great one, at least on the surface.

Thabeet has played for four NBA teams in his five professional seasons, and holds career averages of 2.2 points and 2.7 rebounds per contest.

Thunder trade Hasheem Thabeet to 76ers

Hasheem Thabeet, Maalik Wayns

Is there a place for Hasheem Thabeet in the NBA?

We’ll soon learn the answer to that question, but if there is, it sure isn’t in Oklahoma City.

The Thunder have Steven Adams, Mitch McGary and Kendrick Perkins at center. And if they kept Thabeet past Aug. 31, they’d have to guarantee the final year and $1.25 million of his contract.

So, Oklahoma City could have simply waived Thabeet, increased its flexibility and maintained enough center depth.

Instead, the Thunder have gone a more complicated route.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Because Thabeet’s contract is unguaranteed, the 76ers don’t have to pay him. Any money they got from Oklahoma City is profit.

Essentially, Philadelphia rented its cap space in exchange for a little revenue – and had to rent it only temporarily. Once Thabeet is waived, the 76ers will have just as much cap space as they began the day with, which is to say more than they know what to do with.

The Thunder, in addition to getting a $1.25 million trade exception, trim their roster to 14 players. Perhaps, that final vacant spot could go to Josh Huestis, but why mess up your advantage?

Sitting $2,806,033 below the luxury-tax line, Oklahoma City has time – and a trade exception – to tinker with its roster between now and the trade deadline.

Jabari Parker says he’s ‘trying not to be that second pick bust’


CHICAGO — Jabari Parker was selected by the Milwaukee Bucks with the second overall pick in this year’s draft, but instead of feeling some sense of entitlement given his level of talent and lofty position on the draft board, he’s well aware of how players who were similarly picked at two have fared over the years.

“There’s been a lot of second pick busts,” Parker said Saturday morning, at the grand opening of the redesigned Jordan space inside Nike Chicago. “I’m just trying not to be that bust. Everyday that I step on the court, I just remind myself that I have a long ways to go. If I want to be one of those guys in the first tier of the NBA, like a LeBron, like a Kobe, like a [Blake Griffin], then I have to have that mentality starting off from the ground, and work my way up.”

Parker knows his history.

There is an unusually high amount of players who could rightfully be labeled as being busts that were taken second overall. The list is long, and includes names like Darko Milicic, Michael Beasley, and perhaps most famously Sam Bowie, who the Blazers took second in the 1984 draft, with Michael Jordan’s name still on the board.

In recent years, the players picked second don’t appear like they’ll amount to much, either, though there is still time. Victor Oladipo, last year’s number two pick, seems just fine. But Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Derrick Williams, Evan Turner and Hasheem Thabeet all appear to be miles away from living up to that level of expectation.

Parker is entering the league with a rebuilding Bucks team, and playing his whole life at winning programs like Duke University and Simeon Career Academy high school, he hasn’t experienced much losing. He seems prepared to handle whatever his first season may bring, however, and said his brief professional experience at Summer League in Las Vegas has helped prepare him to meet that challenge.

“I definitely learned that winning isn’t guaranteed, especially in the Summer League,” Parker said. “So I just have to have that gratitude, and just be grateful for every win that I get. If I have that attitude, then we’ll bring some good things to Milwaukee, and hopefully bring those out into the playoffs if we get the chance.”