Tag: hard salary cap

Derek Fisher

Were Fisher, Kobe down with 50/50 split? Maybe, as some players are.


Everyone is not on the same page in the NBA labor negotiations. The owners are not a unified front and neither are the players.

I have heard from players willing right now to take a 50/50 split of basketball related income (BRI) — the league’s revenues — and get on with a season right now. How many players feel that way? There’s no way to know, but other media members have heard the same thing. There are also plenty of players — and virtually every NBA agent — who don’t want the union to go below 52 percent.

Is Derek Fisher among the group good with a 50/50 split? That’s what Jason Whitlock reported at FoxSports.com.

The belief that NBA Players Association president Derek Fisher has been co-opted by commissioner David Stern — and promised the commish he could deliver the union at 50-50 — caused NBPA executive director Billy Hunter and at least one member of the union’s executive committee to confront Fisher on Friday morning and make him reassess his 50-50 push, a source familiar with the negotiations told FOXSports.com Friday afternoon…..

According to my source, at least one five-time champion, NBA superstar with the initials K.B. was on board with Fisher’s push for a 50-50 split. Hunter is firm that the players should not accept less than 52-48. According to my source, Hunter and a member of the executive committee convinced Fisher to stand firm at 52-48 after they questioned the Lakers point guard about his relationship with Stern and deputy commissioner Adam Silver.

No doubt Whitlock has a source that told him this. Is it true? Who knows. That source has an agenda — he doesn’t want the players to go below 52 percent. Said source clearly fears things are going that direction, so the source leaks this stuff about Fisher hoping that it adds to the pressure on Fisher not to “cave.”

Reading between the lines of Fisher and Billy Hunter’s words, it sounds like Fisher told David Stern and the owners that if they really gave in on system issues — leaving the system of contract lengths and exceptions close to what existed in the old deal — then they could talk about a bigger share of BRI for the owners. But the hardline owners want both a system that reins in big teams and gives them a majority of BRI (even 50/50 is not an even split because the owners get expenses off the top).

Really, the two sides are very, very close to a deal. A deal that neither side is going to like, which is the nature of compromise. But as long as the hardliners like the Fox Sports source drive the bus we are not going to have a deal. We are not going to have NBA basketball.

Stern tries to frighten NBA players into taking deal

NBA And Player's Association Meet To Negotiate CBA

David Stern was masterful Friday afternoon.

He put on a frightful Halloween show for the NBA players watching at home.

Certainly it was all spin at his press conference following another day of blown up labor negotiations. He spoke to the media for about 15 minutes (it was broadcast on NBA TV) and NBA union president Derek Fisher would disagree with 14.5 minutes of it.

But the media and even you the fans were not the audience. The NBA players out there were the target. Make no mistake, Stern wanted to scare them. He wanted them to know they were losing money, will be losing more and need to call their union reps and say “take the deal.”

The scare tactics were about money, starting with what is lost with the cancelation of more games.

“I know for a fact in short run players will not be able to make (money lost from cancelled games) back, and probably will never be able to make it back,” Stern said.

He then tried to warn players that the offers the union was getting from the owners now were only going to get worse. Much worse. Because the owners were going to start decreasing offers due to revenue they are losing when games are not played. (Which is a brilliant bit of spin — the owners lose money when games are played, they lose more money when games are not played.)

Stern said the owners officially are offering the players 47 percent of the BRI but that they came into this day offering a 50/50 split out of the goodness of their hearts. Now, the offers will go down, Stern said.

Then Stern tried to throw union head Billy Hunter under the bus, saying Hunter would not budge off 52 and was the one who closed the books and walked out of the room. Stern portrayed himself as a guy who wanted to sit in the room and talk, it was the players who screwed everything up.

Of course, that’s not how Hunter sees it. He said every time the players made a concession the owners “eyes got bigger” and they pushed for more. He said the NBA was not negotiating in good faith.

And you can bet that is the message the union will get out to players starting Friday night. That this breakdown was all the owners and the union will not back down in its fight for the players. The union has remained largely unified so far, but we’ll see if that changes now that paychecks will be lost.

But know that Stern, again, got in the first volley at the rank-and-file players. We’ll see how that works.

It’s official: NBA cancels games through November. Ugh.

NBA Labor Basketball

Even when you know it’s coming, it doesn’t make it any less painful.

There will be no NBA games in November.

David Stern said in his press conference following the dissolution of labor talks (again!) that all games through Nov. 30 would be canceled.

That also means there will be no 82 game NBA season this year, he said.

“It’s not practical, possible or prudent to have a full season now… in light of the breakdown of talks there will not be a full NBA schedule this season,” Stern said.

This cancelation will hit the players in the pocketbook — their first paycheck for this season was due on Nov. 15 (they get paid on the 15th and 30th during the season).

A number of owners had wanted to make the players miss paychecks, to feel that pain, knowing that is their ultimate leverage. The players have been dug in for more than a year knowing this was coming and many say they are fine. Still missing a paycheck is missing a paycheck.

The sticking points in talks remain the split of basketball related income (league revenue) and how a more stiff luxury tax will fit.

The big date looming on the horizon is Christmas, a showcase day for the NBA where marquee teams play on national television. For the more casual sports fan, that is like the NBA’s second opening day. It’s when they really start watching. It will take about 30 days to get up and running from the day the two sides reach a handshake deal, so you do the math. It’s not long.