Tag: Greece

Corey Maggette

Report: Greek team makes offer to Corey Maggette

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Greek teams were not expected to be big players in the “grab an NBA player during the lockout” game because, well, their country’s economy is so bad it’s sucking half of Europe into the seventh level of hell with it.

But at least one team is making a run.

According to TalkBasket.net (who got it from a Greek sports site), PAOK has made an offer to Corey Maggette. No word on if the Bucks swingman and and-one specialist plans to take them up on their offer. He would need to have an opt-out in the deal as he has two years and $21 million left on his contract.

The report also stats that if PAOK doesn’t get Maggette they have a couple other NBA players in mind. PAOK is one of the bigger names in Greek hoops and guys like Peja Stojakovic, Rasho Nesterovic and even current Bucks head coach Scott Skiles have played for them.

Cavs fans had nothing on fans in Greece, just ask Josh Childress

Josh Childress , Al Harrington
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There was a lot of anger in Cleveland last night, a lot of “a—hole” chants and a handful of people tossed from the building.

It reminded the Suns Josh Childress of Greece (where he played the last two seasons).

Well, not really, the Cavaliers fans were not angry enough and did not throw explosives or bodily waste onto the floor. Which is what Childress told FanHouse he saw launched while in Greece.

“Pieces of marble to ceramic, M-80s, lighters, cameras, cell phones, coins, bottles of urine, feces. Everything.”

Wait a minute? Bottles of urine?

“Actually, some of my buddies got hit with them,” Childress said. “I don’t even know why you would think to do that.”


“It’s as bad as it sounds,” Childress said.

Childress said the rule was not to pick up any paper or anything thrown on the court because people would wrap the explosives in them.

Anytime I become disappointed in how we as Americans act as fans at sporting events, I can count on the fans in other countries — usually soccer fans — to remind me just how bad it could be.

All Peja Stojakovic wants is a pain free season

Image (1) nba_stojakovic_250.jpg for post 6330
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Last season, Peja Stojakovic missed 20 games due to a lingering back issue. The year before 21. Those two years his field goal percentage dropped 40 points from what it had been three years ago, from three (his specialty) the percentage dropped 60 points.

Now, at age 33, he told Hornets.com what happens next depends on his health.

“This is my 13th season, so I can say that I really want to go through this year pain-free,” Stojakovic said. “Next year I’m going to be 34, so I will sit down and make a decision on my next move in life, whether I am going to continue to play, which I would love to under one condition: that I’m healthy and that I feel physically right to continue.”

Is it possible, then, that this might be his last season in the league? “I don’t want to think about it,” he said. “It’s very hard for any athlete to think about that. I’m just approaching this year as another year in the NBA. I know that as the year goes by, you take hits on your body and you’ve got to accept that and make adjustments and roll with it.”

The last time Stojakovic was injury free was the 07-08 campaign, when he shot 44 percent from three — and the Hornets went to the playoffs looking like an up-and-coming team. Now it looks like a team that wants to rebuild.

Stojakovic’s name will come up in trades to rebuild the Hornets — he makes $14.2 million as an expiring contract. That’s a big chip for teams desperate to drop payroll, and could be used by the Hornets to bring back pieces that will keep Chris Paul happy. You can bet Del Demps will be shopping him.

How much interest there is in him will be partially determined by his health. It always seems to come back to that. Stojakovic would see his role change to coming off the bench, his minutes could drop again.

Next season Stojakovic will be 34. He could return to Europe (he played professionally in Greece before coming to the Kings in 1996) or maybe find an NBA team where he is the designated shooter off the bench. Either way, he said he does not want to quit playing.

“I’m looking forward to playing a couple more years. I really want to be out there, because I still enjoy the game. Hopefully I’m going to be allowed to do it, health-wise.”

World Championships Round of 16: Spain looks good again, Serbia survives

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krstic_serbia_dunk.jpgSaturday was the most interesting day of the round of 16, two very interesting games between three good teams (Spain, Greece and Serbia) and one solid one (Croatia). Here’s a little roundup.

Spain 80, Greece 72. There was some pretty basketball early on in this one and it became clear that the team that figured out how to stop the other first was going to win this one. That turned out to be Spain, who went to a zone the last 10 minutes of the game that stumped the Greeks.

It was some smart coaching from Spain — they had success with the zone for a stretch in the second quarter but went back to man-to-man and actually fell behind by six points during the third, then went to the zone with the game on the line late. If they had just stuck with the zone, the Greeks might have figured it out.

Ricky Rubio looks good running the offense but he still needs a more consistent shot. He helped Juan Carlos Navarro look good on his way to 22 points on 7 of 10 shooting.

Serbia 73, Croatia 72. Really exciting if not well executed game to start off the knockout round.

Serbia seemed to be in control with just a few minutes to go and up seven, and they had Nenad Krstic to thank for it. He finished with a team high to 16. But Croatia tied it up thanks in large part to some Marko Popovic threes.

Serbia held a three-point lead in a free-throw shooting contest late until a Croatia basket, then Croatia stole a Serbian inbound pass. The ball went to Popovic who was fouled and went to the line, down one. He missed the first and hit the second, so with 11.6 seconds left the game was tied. Then Croatia had a terrible defensive lapse and a back-screen led to a layup for Serbia and a two-point lead.

Then Serbia did something you basically never see in the NBA — they intentionally fouled a Croatian, sending him to the line with the chance to tie it up. Popovic was at the line and he did it, tying the game.

Serbia’s ball, 5.6 seconds left and Serbia’s Aleksandar Rasic got the ball and tried to go the distance, and when a Croatian defender slipped he fouled Rasic in the paint, sending him to the line with a second to go.

Rasic made the first, intentionally missed the second and that was the ballgame.

Serbia gets out with the win, but if they are going to beat Spain next game they are going to have to play a lot better.

FIBA World Championships Day 1: While the USA cruises, Spain loses


France_Spain.jpgYou know the USA was hardly tested in a 106-78 win over Croatia, but the other FIBA World Championship favorite Spain lost its opener. What that means may not be all bad — if Lithuania wins that group (no sure thing yet, by any stretch) the USA and Spain could meet in the finals, not the semi-finals as would happen if Spain wins its group.

But that is a long way off. Here is a recap of Day 1 action from Turkey:

France 72, Spain 66: Portland Trail Blazers fans should be smiling.

Nicolas Batum led this huge upset of the tournament co-favorites, scoring 12 of his 14 points in the second half and five in a row during a crucial series in the fourth quarter. Former Seattle Sonic Mickael Gelabale (he who had a hard time seeing the court because guys like Ray Allen and Kevin Durant were in front of him on the wings) had 16 points in the game and also was a second half force.

France struggled early on because of Spain’s defense, which had the team up 10 in the second quarter. But they seemed to relax in the second half and late lost it completely. Rudy Fernandez was a large part of that — he had a second half technical and some key turnovers in the loss.

Greece 89, China 81: Greece also got ahead early on and then relaxed, but was able to hold off a late charge from China.

Greece raced out to a 14-5 lead and led by 10 at the half, but a 12-2 China run capped of by a monster dunk by former Laker Sun Yue got the game within three in the second half. China actually took the lead on a Yi Jianlian (Wizards) basket with 8 minutes left but then Greece turned on the ball movement again and was able to pull away for the win.

Turkey 86, Ivory Coast 47: The building was packed and loud for the tournament hosts — 7,700 people — as Turkey looked good in its opener.

With Ersan Ilyasova of the Indiana Pacers leading the way, Turkey jumped out to a 14-0 lead and never looked back. While the Ivory Coast cut the lead to six in the second quarter they never really threatened after that.

Argentina 78, Germany 74: About 1,000 fans from Argentina were in the stadium making noise, and the South Americans needed the boost to win a game that was not supposed to be this close.

Germany was actually ahead 42-39 at the half thanks to Demond Greene, but Argentina went on a 14-0 run to start the second half and was able to hold on. Argentina’s star point guard Pablo Prigioni did not play in this one, he was officially resting. We’ll have to follow that one to see the reality.

In other action: Serbia 94, Angola 44; Slovenia 80, Tunisia 56; Lithuania 92, New Zealand 79; Brazil 81, Iran 65; Russia 75, Puerto Rico 66; Australia 76, Jordan 75; Lebanon 81, Canada 71. To get more about these games, go to FIBA’s official tournament Web site.