Tag: Grant Hill

Grant Hill Clippers

Grant Hill says there’s a ‘strong chance’ he’ll retire after this season


Grant Hill joined the Clippers last summer, after the one-year offer that was presented by the Suns was inferior to the two-year deal he received from Los Angeles.

That second year may not end up mattering much after all, since Hill says he’s leaning toward retiring at the conclusion of this season.

From Paul Coro of the Arizona Republic:

Hill, 40, joined the Clippers, began the season on the inactive list after suffering a bone bruise to his right knee, the one which underwent two arthroscopies since 2011 in Phoenix, and did not play until Jan. 12. Hill likely will not make it to that second contract year and opt to retire this summer.

“Strong chance,” Hill said. “I’m leaning toward it. I want to get to the end of the year and off-season and think about it but I’m pretty confident that’s where my mind is right now. I’ve enjoyed it.”

Except for a brief 2008 experiment under then-Suns coach Terry Porter, Hill always had started in his career until this season, when he often is not in the 10-man rotation.

The combination of health and role is likely powerful enough for Hill to make this decision, even before the year is through.

It is crazy, though, how quickly things have changed.

Hill played five seasons in Phoenix, and was not only a constant fixture in the starting lineup, but even as recently as last year, he was the team’s best defender, often drawing the assignment of guarding the opponent’s best player at all but the center position.

Hill also was an underrated finisher on the fast break, often getting out on the wing in transition while consistently making acrobatic plays at the rim appear to be routine, even at this advanced stage of his carer.

With the Suns essentially entering a full-fledged rebuild, it didn’t make sense to retain Hill beyond last season, especially once Steve Nash was dealt to the Lakers. Hill went on to say that he has no regrets in choosing to sign in Los Angeles, even though he isn’t likely to contribute much at all to the Clippers’ fortunes in what very well may be his final NBA season.

Clippers’ Caron Butler out a week with elbow strain

Caron Butler
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Caron Butler is not a guy to oversell injuries. So when he was grabbing his left elbow Sunday night and went straight to the locker room, then when teammates seemed concerned after the game, there was reason for Clippers fans to be a little worried.

X-rays on Sunday night were negative but the MRI was Monday, but that came back about as positive as one could hope as well, the team reported Monday on twitter.

Butler has started 62 games for the Clippers, averaging 10.6 points a game and spacing the floor with his 37 percent three point shooting.

Look for Matt Barnes to get the start (he’s got a sore hand and we’ll see how effective he is) and Grant Hill likely gets a little more run off the bench until Butler returns.

Wilson Chandler with two-hand throwdown over Matt Barnes (VIDEO)

Josh Smith, Wilson Chandler, JaVale McGee

Wilson Chandler would like you to know the Denver Nuggets can put on a show in transition, too.

On this play Ty Lawson strips Grant Hill, gets the ball ahead to Andre Iguodala, who in turn hits Chandler who has run the floor hard straight to the rim. Matt Barnes tries to make a play on the ball but Chandler is throwing down and Barnes isn’t going to stop him.

The Nuggets went on to win and show why they would be so dangerous if they can get home court advantage in the first round.

Clippers bench, Chris Paul too much for Carmelo Anthony alone in L.A. win

Chris Paul

Carmelo Anthony tried — he took over the game in the third quarter, put up 42 points for the game and lifted the Knicks to the lead.

But the Clippers took control of the game again when their bench returned to start the fourth — Los Angeles got 48 points from their bench on the game, led by 27 from Jamal Crawford, compared to the Knicks 15 from the bench.

Throw in Chris Paul looking like his old self and controlling the game down the stretch and you get the Clippers with a comfortable 102-88 win in Madison Square Garden Sunday.

For the Clippers, this was the kind of win they needed after a tough stretch — this game showed exactly how much Paul means to them. He finished with 25 points on 10-of-17 shooting with 7 assists, but that line doesn’t do justice to what a floor general he is and how he controls a game. Down the stretch of this game he was the best player on the court.

But he had the advantage of a lead thanks to that Clippers bench.

In the first half it was the Clippers bench that sparked a 13-0 late in the first quarter into the second that gave the Clippers a lead they held through the break. The Clippers bench was aggressive on defense, forced turnovers and turned those into easy baskets going the other way. The Knicks also started the game 3-of-13 from three, leading to long rebounds and transition chances for the Clippers, where they finish as well as anyone in the league.

Eric Bledsoe had a monster game off the Clippers’ bench — he had a trade showcase kind of game on national television. Back in his comfortable role off the bench he had 13 points on 6-of-6 shooting with four assists and three blocks (including one of Amar’e Stoudemire at the rim.

The Knicks got back in it because Carmelo Anthony owned the third quarter. In the quarter he shot 7-for-10 for 18 points, knocking down threes and abusing everyone who guarded him. From right side of floor he was killing it shooting 8-of-10 in first three quarters. The Clippers didn’t have any answers.

At the start of the fourth they had two — the bench again, which came in and once again stretched out that lead.

They also had Grant Hill take over guarding Carmelo Anthony and he did a good job of denying the ball and forcing the Knicks to look at other options. ‘Melo had four points on 1-of-2 shooting in the fourth quarter and with him out nobody else really stepped up. Raymond Felton had 20 points but needed 18 shots to get them, no other Knick scored in double digits.

Meanwhile, the Clippers had their groove back and a double-digit lead. You knew it was the Clippers night when Griffin hit back-to-back 17-foot jumpers.

The game meant a lot more for the Clippers — who have struggled with Paul out — than for the Knicks. For New York, it’s just another one of those games that leaves you asking how good this team really is as we start to think about the playoffs.

The Extra Pass: The Eric Bledsoe Predicament

Eric Bledsoe Clippers

Los Angeles Clippers guard Eric Bledsoe is one great big problem.

He’s a problem for opponents who have to bring the ball up against him. He’s a problem for big men that think they’ll safely collect rebounds. He’s a problem for the backpedaling guard in transition that has to stay in front of him.

He’s a problem for his coach. He’s better suited to play shooting guard, but he’s 6-foot-1 and shoots a set-shot. So he’s a point guard, but not really. But he’s fast. Too fast. 

Bledsoe is such a problem that now he’s a problem for the entire organization. The secret is out, and other teams want Bledsoe to be their problem.

And here’s where it gets tricky for the Clippers. Head coach Vinny Del Negro views Eric Bledsoe as a point guard, and playing behind the league’s best point guard, he is a backup and little more. To wit, Bledsoe and Paul have played a measly 138 minutes together on the season. For comparison sake, Paul has played 588 minutes next to uninspiring wingman Willie Green.

That’s a problem. The Clippers aren’t maximizing Bledsoe’s value — they’re just using him as one heck of an insurance policy. With Chris Paul in a suit on the sidelines, that looks smart. With Chris Paul being an unrestricted free agent this offseason and not committed long-term, it looks even smarter. Sure, Paul has every reason to stay — more money, winning team, big market — but until it’s on paper, the Clippers can’t build off assumptions.

That’s really the heart of the issue surrounding the trade rumors for Bledsoe. He’s worth more as a player to other teams, but he’s worth more as an asset to the Clippers. Bledsoe is simultaneously the backup plan and the future in that he’s the most desirable, cheapest and realistic trade asset on the team by a large margin.

Pushing all-in for a Kevin Garnett is enticing, but KG isn’t a more valuable asset to the Clippers than Bledsoe is. Don’t get that confused. Garnett is the better player even at 36-years-old, and I’m incredibly comfortable saying a deal involving Butler and Bledsoe for Garnett would make the Clippers better, maybe even so much so that it would vault them to a championship. But moving Bledsoe for a guy on the other side of the hill could also shorten the window to win that championship dramatically and perhaps unnecessarily.

There’s a flip side to that, though. Paul is desperate for a championship and wants to win now more than anything else, and Del Negro is on a one-year deal and hunting for a long-term contract. Chris Paul barely plays with Bledsoe — you don’t think he’d rather have a big man setting the world’s dirtiest screens to free him up instead? You don’t think Del Negro would feel more confident with his coaching career in the hands of one of the greatest defensive players and floor spacers the game has ever seen rather than Lamar Odom and DeAndre Jordan? Moving  Bledsoe doesn’t seem so bad if your length of vision matches the length of your contract.

Still, trading Bledsoe for another veteran assumes an awful lot of risk moving forward outside of Paul’s impending decision. Chauncey Billups, Grant Hill, Lamar Odom, Caron Butler, Matt Barnes — spring chickens they are not. At some point, you have to look at the roster Paul would be coming back to and make sure it’s one that can succeed long-term. Bledsoe is essentially acting as money in the Clippers’ saving account. He’s there for an emergency, but he’s also there to buy a bigger future asset the Clippers would have limited means to acquire otherwise.

This year’s trade deadline doesn’t have to be a boom or bust situation for the Clippers. Bledsoe will still be under contract next year, and it’s hard to imagine he won’t continue to improve. The market for his services is only going to grow.

And really, aren’t the Clippers a legitimate title contender already? This is a team that went an entire month without a loss when they were near full-strength. Adding an aging veteran with title experience that’s already on the roster (Billups) to that group instead of forfeiting current and future contributors for an outside guy is certainly safer, and it’s probably a little smarter, too.