Tag: Grant Hill

Los Angeles Clippers Paul reacts during their loss to the Memphis Grizzlies in Game 5 of their NBA Western Conference Quarterfinals basketball playoff series in Los Angeles

Clippers confident Chris Paul will stay with team this summer. They should be.


Chris Paul and his agent are going to get calls — he is the best point guard in the NBA and he is an unrestricted free agent. He can go anywhere he wants this summer. Teams are going to take a shot.

But they all know it’s a long shot. At best.

The Clippers are rightfully confident he’s going to stay. That is the feeling around the league, too.

The Clippers will make re-signing Paul their top off-season priority but Clippers vice president of basketball operations Gary Sacks — the GM in practice — sounded very confident speaking to the media on Monday during the Clippers day of exit interviews. From ESPNLosAngeles.com.

Sacks met with Paul on Saturday during the team’s exit interview and believes that he will be back, but was cautious about getting into details with Paul becoming an unrestricted free agent and not being able to sign an extension until July 1.

“A lot of that information we’ll keep private, because that’s an internal thing, but I feel very confident,” Sacks said. “I think he’s an integral part of this. We feel like we had a great partnership for the last couple of years and we want to continue it obviously.”

Paul knows he’s on a team that can win (56 regular season wins this year), has good players and he likes living in Los Angeles.

But there’s another reason he likely stays — he was key in putting this roster together. While Blake Griffin was already here (and already changing the Clippers’ culture) when they traded for Chris Paul, a lot of the roster moves since then — keeping Grant Hill, getting Jamal Crawford — were things Paul wanted.

Mark Heisler wrote about this for Hoopshype.

The insiders learned a year ago that Paul had no intention of leaving, for more reasons that the fact he was on a promising young team in Lala Land. Paul wasn’t just on the Clippers, he had so much input, he was virtually running the team.

It was even acknowledged by a Clippers official, noting, “This is Chris’s roster.”

This is pretty much an open secret around the league.

It’s why nobody thinks Chris Paul is leaving — he has everything he wants in Los Angeles.

Well, maybe except the right coach. But you can bet he has a lot of say on that, too.

Report: Suns waiting to pick GM because they want Grant Hill to take job

Grant Hill Clippers

This would be a very Suns thing to do: Look past the guys who have worked hard in this role to earn the job and give it to the name guy you like who has no experience.

The Phoenix Suns are in the process of hiring a new general manager for a team that needs a vision for their rebuild since firing Lance Blanks after the season. They have interviewed two guys according to the Arizona Republic: Bucks assistant GM Jeff Weltman and Celtics assistant GM Ryan McDonough.

So what’s holding up the choice? They are waiting for Grant Hill to decide if he wants to play or to take the job, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.

Take a sourced rumor like this with a grain of salt, but it’s also certainly not impossible.

Hill is a smart player, no doubt. One beloved by many in Phoenix. He could be really great team executive some day, he has the mind for it and he knows the game.

But if former agent and now Team President Lon Babby and owner Robert Sarver are willing to hand over control of the team to a guy who has no front office experience… that would just be very Suns. Being a GM has a lot of nuances that need to be learned through experience — like any tough job. You don’t walk in off the street and just do it.

Why not hire Weltman or McDonough and have Hill work under them for a few years to learn the job?

Well, because they are the Suns. That’s why.

Grizzlies advance to the second round with Game 6 win over Clippers

Memphis Grizzlies guard Allen and Memphis Grizzlies forward Randolph celebrate during the second half of NBA basketball action in Memphis

It was more of exactly what we’ve seen over the last three games of this series between the Grizzlies and the Clippers in Game 6, and that meant the end of the season for Los Angeles.

The particulars changed slightly, but the level of confidence from Memphis and disarray from the Clippers remained constant. The Grizzlies advanced to the second round of the playoffs with a 118-105 victory that was every bit as comfortable for much of the second half as the final score would indicate.

Blake Griffin didn’t start for the Clippers, and was limited to just 14 minutes of action off the bench. The sprained ankle that he suffered in advance of Game 5 was still too swollen for him to be able to be as productive as was needed in an elimination game on the road, and the word was that the severity of the injury would have sidelined him for three weeks had it occurred during the regular season.

With Griffin sidelined, that left Vinny Del Negro, in what may very well have been his final game roaming the Clippers’ sidelines, scrambling with his lineups. One of Del Negro’s biggest criticisms has always been his inability to manage minutes and player rotations for maximum effectiveness, and in a move of desperation, played Eric Bledsoe less than 10 minutes and Jamal Crawford just 12 in favor of Grant Hill and Willie Green, who had barely seen the court at all previously in the series.

Del Negro repeatedly said afterward that he was trying to go small to get an advantage, but it was the Grizzlies’ guards — not Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol — who did the bulk of the damage offensively. Mike Conley and Tony Allen finished with 23 and 19 points respectively, and combined for more free throw attempts between the two of them (28) than the Clippers had as a team (24) for the entire game.

The referees called this one tightly throughout, and Memphis tallied 20 free throw attempts in the first quarter alone on their way to a 47-24 advantage. This wasn’t a one-game problem for the Clippers, however, as they’ve been whistled heavily for personal fouls, far above their season average, over the course of this series. Veteran official Joey Crawford played fast and loose with both the technical fouls and the flagrant calls in this one, and actually ejected both Chris Paul and Zach Randolph in the game’s final few minutes for seemingly innocuous actions in completely separate incidents.

The Grizzlies move on to face the Thunder in the second round of the playoffs, and that series begins in Oklahoma City on Sunday.

As for the Clippers, things are much more complicated — Paul becomes an unrestricted free agent this summer, and Del Negro is not under contract for next season.

Marcin Gortat says lack of character in younger players a big problem for the Suns


PHOENIX — Marcin Gortat was among the veteran Suns players who weren’t at all happy with the way this season went in Phoenix. Along with Goran Dragic and Jared Dudley, Gortat is a holdover from better times the team experienced while playing with the likes of Steve Nash and Grant Hill, two of the game’s ultimate professionals.

As things have changed and with the Suns now in a full-fledged rebuilding situation, there was a need to integrate younger players into the fold, and the pain of this process was evident as Gortat spoke with reporters on the event level of the US Airways Center on Thursday morning.

Gortat was brutally honest in his assessment of the team’s issues, and ripped the lack of character displayed by the team’s younger players.

“I think we need some changes,” he said. “We need some serious conversations. We need to look in the mirror and each one of us has got to ask if we did everything that was necessary to win, or if we did everything that was necessary to perform at 100 percent. But first of all I’m going to look at myself. I’m going to try to correct myself and hopefully the management and the front office people will do the right thing.”

When asked what skill set needed to be improved on the roster, Gortat pointed to issues more mental than physical.

“Well, I would say we are missing character,” he said. “We are missing just strong minds on the team. We are just weak, mentally weak, basically. I would say that we just need more talent. We need more talent, we need more athletic, energetic guys, and people that want to compete and fight. That’s it.

“But like I said, that’s a decision to make by the people in the front office. I’m just going to look at myself and try to correct my mistakes and try to be better next year.”

Gortat was pressed on the character issue, and essentially said that there was a segment of the team that didn’t seem to care whether they won or lost.

“At the end of the day, it’s all about the player,” he said. “If you don’t feel that you’ve got to work, if you feel comfortable that somebody’s coming into your house and punking your ass by 30 points every night, it’s not right. It’s just not right. I’ve been in the league six years now and I’ve never been in a situation like that.”

Gortat said that he tried a few times to provide some leadership, but that ultimately he didn’t feel like he had the cache to get the attention of his teammates.

“I tried at least to approach a few younger players during the season,” he said. “I don’t think I had the impact. I don’t think as a player, a six-year veteran, I have that impact yet. Definitely Jermaine O’Neal was the guy that was trying to convince a lot of the young guys to perform better.

“But I’ve got to tell you, when I was making it in the league, I was listening. I was listening and I had a lot of great veterans, I had a lot of great strong-minded people on the team. If I had tried to act like a smart-ass, or I tried to pretend like I know everything or understand everything, I’d get slapped in the head automatically, and [Stan Van Gundy in Orlando] would bring me back to earth. Like I said, I grew up in a great system. These young guys, there’s a lot of young guys who just think they’re better than they really are.”

Gortat didn’t name names, of course, but he didn’t have to. A cursory glance at the Suns roster will tell you that any issues that may have stemmed from “young players” would likely have to involve Michael Beasley, Markieff Morris, Marcus Morris, or Wesley Johnson. But to be fair, everyone on the roster except for O’Neal and Luis Scola is younger than Gortat.

It will be an interesting offseason for the Suns, and Gortat will undoubtedly see plenty of the change he called for a day after the team’s 25-57 season came to its merciful conclusion. In addition to personnel changes, whether through the draft or free agency, the team needs to address head coach Lindsey Hunter’s interim situation, as well as the future of GM Lance Blanks, who has just one year left on his contract.

Gortat didn’t exclude himself from the criticism, but made it clear that he was among those on the team who want nothing to do with another year like this.

“We’ve got to be tougher with everything we do, including me,” he said. “Starting with me. Just because I’m talking about our whole team doesn’t mean I’m doing a great job. I’ve got to be tougher, do everything 100 percent better, and like I said, I never want to be in a situation like that for the rest of my life.

“It was so uncomfortable,” he said. “It was a crazy season and no one wants to have a season like that again.”

Clippers move closer to home court advantage in first round of playoffs with win over Grizzlies

Blake Griffin, Marc Gasol

The Clippers got a huge win in terms of their possible playoff position on Saturday, by rolling into Memphis and taking down the Grizzlies 91-87.

The victory puts L.A. in the driver’s seat for home court advantage in a potential first round matchup against these same Grizzlies, and gives the team a chance of moving up to the three spot in the West should it win the remaining three games on the schedule.

The game was tight throughout, and came down to the final few possessions.

Memphis led by five with 9:32 to play, but the Clippers put together a 14-0 run over the next three and a half minutes to go up by nine. The Grizzlies battled back to within two, and had possession with 18 seconds remaining. Mike Conley tried a floater over DeAndre Jordan that was blocked, but Memphis retained possession.

An inbounds pass attempt by Conley to Zach Randolph with five seconds left was broken up by Blake Griffin, who then leaked out on the break and was fouled by Jerryd Bayless. It was ruled a clear path foul, so even though Griffin missed both free throws, the Clippers retained possession and Jamal Crawford hit the two free throws that gave us the game’s final margin.

Caron Butler sat out the second half with a sore knee, which allowed Grant Hill to see his first action since March 30. Hill made two big buckets and came through with a couple of blocked shots in his 11 minutes of action, and 10 of those came in the fourth quarter. A healthy Grant Hill — the version we saw a glimpse of in this one — would be a huge boost to the Clippers’ depth in the playoffs.

On the Memphis side, the same issues the team has struggled with all season long became a problem once again in the fourth quarter, when the Grizzlies managed just 14 points. The lack of a legitimate and consistent offensive threat remains a problem, and one that I’m not sure ever gets solved with this current roster, and definitely not in time to win a playoff series.

The Clippers are in a strong position to remain the four seed entering the playoffs, but they also have a chance of moving into the three spot should the Nuggets lose one of their remaining three games. It isn’t likely, however, considering that Denver is 20-3 in its last 23 games, and ends the season by hosting Portland, playing at Milwaukee, and then hosting the Suns.

It’s more than likely we’ll see the Clippers and the Grizzlies in a rematch of their epic playoff battle from a season ago. L.A. won a Game 7 in Memphis to close the Grizzlies out last year, but this time around, the Clippers are in line to have the home court advantage.