Tag: Grant Hill

Los Angeles Lakers v Denver Nuggets

Report: Dwight Howard not going to Clippers… did we need a report for that?


It’s Dwight Howard silly rumor season.

Everyone knows the Lakers are still the front-runners in this race but the latest reports have the Rockets and Mavericks at least in a good stalking position to make a move once this race moves into the home stretch. Other teams may try to get into the mix as well.

But the Clippers? No. Never was going to happen. But just to reinforce that we have Ramona Shelburne of ESPN (who has been killing it lately).

I’ll give you a couple quick reasons. One: Money. Dwight wants a max deal; the man wants to get paid. The Clippers could do that if they convince the Lakers to take DeAndre Jordan back in a sign-and-trade… good luck with that. Or, they can trade Caron Butler or Eric Bledsoe for nothing, plus let Grant Hill and Willie Green go. Then after signing Dwight they could re-sign Chris Paul under his “Bird rights” to a max deal so there would be three max contracts on the roster. And then Donald Sterling can get ready to pay a lot of luxury tax — which you know he really wants to do.

Also, Howard wants a team where he is the star. Chris Paul is the Clippers star, unquestioned, and Blake Griffin is by his side and even more so is the face of local marketing. You think Howard fits there as a trio? And that’s not even discussing how that group seems an odd match on the court.

But there you go. Deal dead.

By the way, the Chris Paul to the Knicks rumors are just about this likely. He’s not leaving the Clippers.

George Hill injury jeopardizes Pacers’ identity

George Hill, Roy Hibbert, D.J. Augustin

The puzzle pieces have changed, but the picture of the sailboat they form has not.

Under Frank Vogel, the Pacers have relied heavily on their starters. Between them, George Hill, Lance Stephenson, Paul George, David West and Roy Hibbert excel in all areas of the court, offensively and defensively, and really balance each other. But even when the pieces were slightly different – Danny Granger in place of Stephenson or Darren Collison in place of Hill – the positive results remained.

2013 playoffs (Hill, Stephenson, George, West, Hibbert)

  • Starters: +69 in 209 minutes
  • Other lineups: –45 in 319 minutes

2012-13 regular season (Hill, Stephenson, George, West, Hibbert)

  • Starters: +284 in 1,218 minutes
  • Other lineups: +42 in 2,700 minutes

2012 playoffs (Hill, Granger, George, West, Hibbert)

  • Starters: +86 in 240 minutes
  • Other lineups: –71 in 293 minutes

2011-12 regular season (Collison, Granger, George, West, Hibbert)

  • Starters: +189 in 1,000 minutes
  • Other lineups: +29 in 2,198 minutes

In some ways, it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy, because, the more they play together, the better they play together. Even when the main lineup changed, Indiana showed a strong commitment to the new lineup.

In each of the last two seasons, the Pacers have had the league’s second-highest raw plus-minus. The No. 1 team has changed around them, and in both cases, Indiana held a huge lead over No. 3.

This achievement combines two factors, quality and quantity. For example, a unit that outscores opponents by 1 point per minute and played 10 minutes together (+10) would rank ahead of a unit that outscores opponents by 3 points per minute and played 3 minutes together (+9).


  • Thunder (Russell Westbrook-Thabo Sefolosha-Kevin Durant-Serge Ibaka-Kendrick Perkins): +288
  • Pacers: +284
  • Heat (Mario Chalmers-Dwyane Wade-LeBron James-Udonis Haslem-Chris Bosh): +157


  • Suns (Steve Nash-Jared Dudley-Grant Hill-Channing Frye-Marcin Gortat): +208
  • Pacers: +189
  • Heat (Mario Chalmers-Dwyane Wade-LeBron James-Chris Bosh-Joel Anthony: +108

The Pacers’ top lineup led the NBA in raw plus-minus in the 2012 playoffs, and it again leads during the 2013 playoffs.

But the peril of the Pacers’ plan is showing with the injury to Hill, who’s still day-to-day. Every team would miss Hill’s defense and outside shooting, but the Pacers will especially miss how Hill interacted with Stephenson, George, West and Hibbert. More so than other teams, Indiana is shook by an injury to a single starter regardless of which it is.

So, D.J. Augustin stepping into the starting lineup will challenge a lot of what Indiana likes to do. When Augustin plays with the Pacers’ other four starters, they’re +5 in 25 minutes during the playoff, though 17 of those minutes came during Game 5 against the Knicks with Hill out (+2). But, using a larger and seemingly more reliable sample, Indiana was –17 in 93 minutes during the regular season with that unit. That was the Pacers’ most-used lineup that was outscored by opponents.

Maybe Vogel now wishes he had given more playing time to lineups besides his starting unit. But if he had, maybe the Pacers wouldn’t have come this far in the first place.

Why do the Knicks keep playing Jason Kidd?

D.J. Augustin, Jason Kidd

Jason Kidd has scored exceptionally during the playoffs.

There are many ways to evaluate scoring, but here’s how five players rank by one measure:

  • Jason Kidd: 73
  • Carmelo Anthony: 24
  • Stephen Curry: 23
  • Kevin Durant: 21
  • LeBron James: 17

That’s how many points each player has scored during the 2013 playoffs, as a percentage of the total points scored by their draft class.

Kidd has gotten a lot of flack for his eight-game scoreless streak, but he’s 40 years old. 40! It’s not his fault the Knicks keep sending him out to miss shots, as his rut has now reached 0-for-17.

The Clippers didn’t rely on Grant Hill, the only other member of the 1994 draft class to score in these playoffs. The Heat aren’t even playing Juwan Howard. NBA teams long ago stopped asking players Glenn Robinson, Eddie Jones and Brian Grant to contribute.

But the Knicks keep trotting out Kidd, hoping for better results. And in that way, they’ve elevated Kidd’s scoreless streak into unprecedented territory.

Since 1963-64, as far back as Basketball-Reference’s streak finder goes, there have been 32 scoreless streaks of at least eight games,* including two each by Mark Madsen and John Salley. But most of those streaks came from end-of-bench players who didn’t play much.

Kidd is still an integral part of New York’s rotation.

Here’s how many minutes each player had during his scoreless streak. Keep in mind, some of these streaks have lasted a game or two longer than Kidd’s, but I’m still counting total minutes.

Kidd is represented by the orange bar that towers over everyone else, who are represented in blue.

pbt jason kidd scoreless streak

*Any streaks that spanned more than five seasons might not be counted due to the setup of B-R’s streak finder.

**McDowell’s minute total does not include the first game of his scoreless streak.

***Minutes played weren’t available for Fernsten’s and Fillmore’s streaks.

New York has other options. Pablo Prigioni and Chris Copeland can score a bit, and it’s not like Kidd is helping in other ways. The Knicks have defended worse in the playoffs with Kidd on the court.

But they just keep asking Kidd to do what he can no longer do.

Derrick Rose not playing Game 3. Shocking. Deng, Hinrich also out.

Heat Bulls Basketball

I can’t believe it — after missing 96 games Derrick Rose decided not to come back in the middle of a physical, intense playoff series to be guarded by Lebron James. Shocking. Who could have possibly seen such a thing coming?

Despite all logic and all evidence to the contrary, some weak reports started to fuel a whole “Rose is likely coming back for Game 3 at home” momentum that was always just ridiculous. But that never stopped a good rumor before.

Tom Thibodeau killed it on Friday at shootaround — Rose is not playing in Game 3. Neither are Luol Deng or Kirk Hinrich.

Deng didn’t sound like he would be back saying he dropped 15 pounds due to complications from a spinal tap. Hinrich had a second MRI showing muscle damage in his leg but the injury is not healing.

In the case of Rose, this is not a shock but it’s not going to play well with some in Chicago — they look at Iman Shumpert being back, with Rose being past the original timeline laid out for his injury, that he has been cleared by doctors and say he should be back.

As I have said all along, Rose is right to make the decision he is most comfortable with, his PR mistake is just leaving the door open. And that is his mistake — Rose wants it that way. Not the Bulls. Not Tom Thibodeau. Not anyone but Rose. As long as he says he might come back the team has to play along, and Rose isn’t willing to put the dream of this season away publicly. For whatever reason.

But this is no time to come back.

First, if he’s not comfortable he shouldn’t. Being cleared by doctors doesn’t make you healthy — just ask Grant Hill or Bill Walton about that. If he is experiencing any pain, or if he is just not comfortable yet playing his game — which is based on explosive moves and fast stops — then he should sit out. Not you, not me, not radio talk show hosts, not anybody but Rose knows what his knee feels like and when he’ll be ready.

More importantly, this would just be a bad time to come back. He’d play 15 minutes off the bench, be shaking off rust, and the Heat wouldn’t take him lightly he’d get LeBron and Norris Cole (a good man defender) locked up on him with quick doubles coming. It’s one thing to go from practice 5-on-5 games to a regular season game — even that is a jump that takes adjustments — but to go to a playoff intensity game against one of the most athletic and aggressive defenses in the game is another. Rose would struggle and hurt the team at this point.

I’d tell him to just say he’s shutting it down until next season, but the time to do that passed three weeks or so ago.

Grant Hill would like to remind you doctors cleared him to play so he came back early

Orlando Magic v Washington Wizards

“Derrick Rose has been cleared by the team doctors, what is his problem?”

“Derrick Rose owes it to his teammates to come back.” (That would be Steve Kerr talking on TNT during the Bulls Game 2 loss).

The pressure from the public and media on Rose to return from his ACL surgery a year ago is growing — especially in Chicago, where the once unassailable star is taking a beating. Why can’t he come back? Why is he soft? We want our athletes to play through anything — like much of the Bulls roster these playoffs. Why won’t Rose? What could go wrong?

Two words for you: Grant Hill.

Grant Hill was a max player, a 25-point a game player with the Pistons who was the next Michael Jordan at the time. He was on his way to a max deal (which he got) and… A fantastic piece at Bloomberg talking to Hill lays it all out (via Deadspin).

Toward the end of that season, Hill’s ankle started bothering him. The Pistons’ trainers treated it and Hill continued playing, but the ankle kept getting worse. After he pulled himself from a game, the team’s doctors assured him that it was merely a bone bruise. Hill sat out the last few games of the regular season, amid criticism that he was worried about jeopardizing his free-agent payday. He returned for the playoffs, but in his second game he felt a “pop” in his ankle. Hill couldn’t go on. The ankle was diagnosed as broken. He underwent surgery four days later.

The story might still have ended happily. In August 2000, three months after his ankle surgery, the Orlando Magic signed Hill to a seven-year, $93 million deal. In September, Orlando cleared him to scrimmage against his new teammates. “I’m going against guys on the Magic that six months earlier I averaged 40 points against,” Hill said. “And I’m not feeling right.”

Hill had four more surgeries and was never right again. He had a long career as a journeyman but he never was the same player again. Not close.

The Magic had made a mistake, pushing Hill back onto the court before his ankle had fully healed. But Hill had made a mistake, too, deferring to the judgment of the team’s doctors and ignoring his own instincts. He stayed in the NBA — he may retire this summer, at 40, after spending the season with the Los Angeles Clippers — but he never played with the same confidence again. “If I had sat out for a whole season, who knows what would have happened?” Hill said.

Team doctors have are hired and paid for by teams — who do you think they are looking out for? It’s why you see many players get second opinions on injuries and treatments.

While Rose may have been cleared to play the Bulls and team doctors haven’t pressured him to do so — frankly the only reason they door hasn’t been fully shut on Rose returning this season is because he will not allow it. Rose is the one who tells the press maybe.

I don’t expect him back for Game 3 despite the rumors, the reports out of the media actually at the practice is that nothing has changed.

And if he does come back at this point, I don’t think it helps the team much — he’s rusty, his minutes will be limited and the Heat will throw really good defenders such as LeBron James and Norris Cole at him. And they will be physical with him — very physical. This series is trending that way.

But those saying he needs to race back for teammates or whatever have lost sight of what really matters to the Bulls — the next decade with Rose leading the Bulls as an elite team. Not these playoffs.