Tag: Golden State Warriors

Washington Wizards v Cleveland Cavaliers

Martell Webster as stretch four? Wizards may try it next season.

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When the Washington Wizards tip-off next season, they will have Marcin Gortat at center and Nene at power forward.

But their moves this summer show that when one of those two sits (specifically Nene) the Wizards will embrace going small, as they did last playoffs when they blistered the Raptors in the first round. (Small-ball was less effective against the Hawks.) Washington let Kevin Seraphin walk to the Knicks this summer and replaced him with guys like Jared Dudley, a stretch four. (Paul Pierce left, but it was Otto Porter’s time.)

What about Martell Webster?

He may play some stretch four, too. But he is going to have to earn those minutes, notes J. Michael at CSNmidatlantic.com.

Webster played some (at the four) when he began his career with the Portland Trail Blazers and the Wizards have floated the  possibility of using him there when — if? — he can work his way back onto the court.

The challenge, of course, will be cracking the rotation that already has Drew Gooden, Jared Dudley and Alan Anderson expecting to log a majority of the time there behind Nene when the Wizards go to small-ball lineups.  Webster, who is 6-7, played in just 32 games last season which was his least since the 2008-09 season. It also was the first time since then that Webster didn’t log a start.

The challenge for Webster — and the Wizards as a whole — going small is on the defensive end. As Matt Moore pointed out in an interesting piece at CBSSports.com, the Wizards three-point shooting and offense was much better when they went small, but the Hawks defense neutralized that somewhat. Worse yet the small ball Wizards simply tried to outscore teams, their defense suffered. That can sometimes work, against certain lineups, but it is not a long-term solution. Look at it this way, the Warriors are champions because they can go small without sacrificing defensively (thanks to Draymond Green — that’s why he’s getting paid more than you, Tristan). That is hard to replicate.

Webster is going to have to stay healthy then actually knock down threes to see the court as a stretch four — you don’t help space the floor if nobody respects you from three.

But as the Wizards go small more often — at least we expect Randy Wittman to go small more — Webster will get a chance to prove he has a role with the team, and in a small-ball NBA.


Draymond Green blocking LeBron James, now as an emoji collage (PHOTO)

LeBron James, Draymond Green

Remember Draymond Green blocking LeBron James in overtime of Game 2 of the Finals?

Well, now that iconic image exists as an emoji collage, courtesy of Warriors social-media manager Julie Phayer:

Emojis are the most 2010s art form imaginable, but it sort of looks like an old mosaic. Very cool.

Warriors rookie Kevon Looney out 4-6 months after hip surgery

Kevon Looney, Bob Myers

Once upon a time, UCLA forward Kevon Looney was considered a surefire lottery pick, but concerns about his hip raised red flags around the league. The Warriors took him 30th overall in June, the final pick of the first round of the draft, and they’ve announced that he’ll be out four to six months after undergoing surgery to repair a torn labrum.

Here’s the team’s press release:

Golden State Warriors forward Kevon Looney underwent a successful right hip arthroscopy this morning to repair a torn labrum, the team announced today.  The procedure was performed by renowned Steadman Clinic orthopaedic surgeon and hip specialist Dr. Marc Philippon at the Vail Valley Surgery Center in Vail, Colorado.

Looney will begin rehabilitation from the surgery immediately and is expected to be out a minimum of four-to-six months before returning to basketball activity.

“Kevon has his entire NBA career ahead of him and we felt that, in consultation with our medical staff, Kevon and his representatives, it was best to address the issue now,” said Warriors General Manager Bob Myers. “He will have our complete support throughout the rehabilitation process and we are confident he will make a full recovery.”

The Warriors are in a fortunate position with Looney because they didn’t need much out of him in his rookie season. They’re coming off a historically great season that included 67 regular-season wins and the franchise’s first NBA title in 40 years. Other than trading David Lee and picking up Jason Thompson, their roster is essentially the same as it was last season, which means it’s going to be virtually impossible for a rookie to compete for minutes with the likes of Draymond Green, Harrison Barnes and Andre Iguodala. They drafted Looney because they saw him as more talented than the 30th pick and they could afford to take a long-term, proactive approach with his health. Nipping this issue now, while he’s not needed on the court, makes sense.