Tag: Golden State Warriors

NBA Draft Prospects Workout 2015

Report: Buzz around NBA is that D’Angelo Russell doesn’t want to play for Sixers


Early on in the pre-draft evaluation process, it was reported that the Sixers would be selecting D’Angelo Russell with the third overall pick.

The thinking, of course, was that Philadelphia needed a point guard who could shoot a solid percentage from three-point distance, after dealing a reigning Rookie of the Year in Michael Carter-Williams in part because he could not.

But most mock drafts now have Kristaps Porzingis slotted to go to the Sixers at three, and it’s worth wondering if Russell’s reported preference to play elsewhere may be partially responsible for the change in¬†perception.

From Brad Turner of the Los Angeles Times:

After trading point guard Michael Carter-Williams, the 2014 rookie of the year, to Milwaukee this past season, it would appear that the 76ers need a point guard.

But the buzz around the NBA is that D’Angelo Russell, a 6-5 point guard from Ohio State whom many see as a lesser Stephen Curry-type, doesn’t want to play for the unpredictable 76ers. Russell did work out for the 76ers last week.

Let’s start with the obvious, which is that it doesn’t matter one bit if Russell would indeed prefer to play somewhere else. That will change immediately if Philadelphia decides to select him, and players entering the league at the top of the draft no longer have the power to force their way to a particular landing spot.

If you’re Russell, however, there are reasons to be concerned.

The way Philadelphia bailed on Carter-Williams midway through his second season was alarming from a player perspective, even if the Sixers had more than one legitimate reason for doing so. Add in the fact that the team has brought in injured players the last two years who were forced to sit out (at least) their first full NBA season, along with the way the team has continued its prolonged rebuild by fielding what has essentially amounted to a D-League roster, and it’s easy to understand why, at least at this point, the Sixers are a less-than-desirable destination.

Draymond Green on Cavaliers during championship parade: “We won. They suck.” (VIDEO)

Draymond Green

What, you were expecting restraint from Draymond Green during the Warriors’ championship parade? This is what he had to say about the Cavaliers on Friday:

This is totally in character for the notoriously outspoken and confident Green, who’s about to get paid a lot of money this summer. You can already see the “classless” backlash coming, but the guy just won a championship. Let him have a little fun.

Report: NBA attempting to discourage teams from saying they’ll match offers on restricted free agents

Jimmy Butler, Giannis Antetokounmpo

For as long as anyone can remember, teams with stars facing restricted free agency have been saying publicly that they’ll match any offer sheet those players get. It’s a way of both reassuring fans that their favorite player is in the team’s long-term plans and making other teams think twice about tying up their cap space with an offer sheet.

According to a new report by ESPN.com’s Marc Stein, the NBPA isn’t thrilled about the practice, and the league is attempting to discourage teams from doing it.

ESPN.com has learned that the NBA, as far back as November, issued a memo to all teams warning them that the NBA Players Association has officially taken the position that the well-worn “we’ll match any offer” reflex strategy and its corresponding intent to discourage interest in a particular RFA is a circumvention of the salary cap.

The league’s memo, sources said, took the rare step of further cautioning teams that, while the NBA itself doesn’t concur with the NBPA’s view, league officials see enough potential merit in the union’s stance to advise those who persist with match-any-offer chatter that they could be opening themselves up to legal action.

This is going to be a big summer for restricted free agents: the Bulls’ Jimmy Butler, the Warriors’ Draymond Green, the Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard, the Pistons’ Reggie Jackson, the Cavs’ Tristan Thompson and the Bucks’ Khris Middleton lead this year’s crop. All of those players will undoubtedly draw interest around the league, but particularly in the case of Butler, Leonard and Green, it’s widely expected that their teams will match anything.

This stance against the “we’ll-match-any-offer” rhetoric is right in line with the approach NPBA executive director Michele Roberts has taken since she started as the leader of the players’ union. It’s exactly what she should be doing. Restricted free agency is a tricky issue, because the NBA wants teams, particularly those in small markets, to have a mechanism to keep their young stars, and the players want the freedom to choose their own teams.

There is some merit to the idea that a team saying publicly that they’ll match all offers can kill a player’s earning power and leverage. Under normal circumstances, Eric Bledsoe would have been one of the most sought-after free agents on the market last summer, but teams were so convinced that the Suns would match their offer sheets that they showed no appetite whatsoever for going after him. Bledsoe dangled in restricted free agency until almost the start of training camp, when he finally agreed to a five-year, $70 million deal to stay with the Suns. Roberts wants to prevent a similar situation from taking place with someone like Butler or Middleton.