Tag: Golden State Warriors

Anthony Davis

Spike Lee narrates Anthony Davis’ rise to stardom in new ‘NBA 2K16’ promo (VIDEO)


Anthony Davis is the fastest-rising star in the NBA. He just inked a five-year $143 million extension with the Pelicans and comes into his fourth season widely expected to be the next transcendent, generational superstar at the LeBron James/Kevin Durant level. He’s also one of three cover athletes for NBA 2K16, which will be out in October. The other two, James Harden and reigning MVP Stephen Curry, have already gotten videos in which Spike Lee narrates their rises to fame. Now, Davis has his:

“When people talk about the greatest ever, I want to be in that conversation,” Davis says at the beginning of the video. Considering what he’s done already and the fact that he’s only 22, it’s not a stretch to imagine that he will be discussed in those terms by the time his career is over.

Report: Warriors signing Jarell Eddie in their quest to find a shooter

Indiana Pacers v Orlando Magic-Blue

Stephen Curry is one of the NBA’s best 3-point shooters (maybe ever). Klay Thompson is an incredible second option from behind the arc. Draymond Green and Harrison Barnes also made more than a 3-pointer per game last season, providing nice support from the frontcourt.

But – with all due respect for the streaky Andre Iguodala and Leandro Barbosa, who has distributing responsibilities – the Warriors could use another spot-up outside shooter off the bench.

That’s why they signed Ian Clark.

It’s also why they’re signing Jarell Eddie.

Shams Charania of RealGM:

Eddie shot 37% on 3-pointers in four seasons in Virginia Tech, but he went undrafted last year. So, he went to the D-League and make 43% of his 3-pointers.

The Warriors have 13 players with guaranteed contracts plus James McAdoo ($100,000 guaranteed), Chris Babb (unguaranteed), Clark and Eddie. I doubt Clark or Eddie got much, if any, of a guarantee, though that’s still unclear. Facing the luxury tax, Golden State probably doesn’t want much dead money on the books. Though most teams use a partial guarantee, the Warriors can entice quality players in this free agent tier by offering the chance of a role on an excellent team with a good record of player development. That can pay off with more money down the road.

McAdoo’s guarantee gives him a leg up for making the regular-season roster. That leaves Eddie, Clark and Babb competing for one – maybe two if McAdoo falters – roster spot(s). That’s a lot of pressure on each shot during training camp and the preseason, but that’s what the Warriors want. If all goes well, they’ll be in more high-pressure situations about eight months later.

Glen Davis: Clippers would have beaten Warriors in Western Conference finals

Los Angeles Clippers v Golden State Warriors

In reality, the Clippers blew a 3-1 series lead to the Rockets in the second round of last year’s playoffs. Houston lost in five games in the Western Conference finals to the Warriors, who won the NBA championship.

In an alternate reality – where the Clippers didn’t blow it against the Rockets – what would have happened in the Western Conference finals?

Glen Davis, who played for the Clippers last season, on CBS Sports Network (hat tip: James Herbert of CBSSports.com):

We would’ve beat Golden State. We would’ve beat Golden State. And I think the reason why is because Blake Griffin. Who’s going to guard Blake Griffin? You got these little 4s, range-shooting 4s. Blake’s 6-9. He’s a true power forward. And then also, he can play around the perimeter. It’s hard to stop that when you’re playing small ball.

I mean, maybe.

But probably not.

The Warriors, an all-time great team, were definitely better than the Clippers. The Clippers were good enough to beat any team in a playoff series with the right breaks, but so what? So are several teams every year. That’s why upsets happen. It doesn’t suddenly make an upset likely.

The Clippers didn’t present a particular matchup problem for Golden State, either. The Warriors won three of four regular-season games between the teams.

Griffin didn’t even present a particular individual matchup problem. Draymond Green is one of the NBA’s best defenders, and he could have guarded Griffin as well as anybody can. Yes, Griffin scored 40 points in a regular-season game against Golden State – but Green didn’t play. Griffin shot just 33% while Green was on the court last season (63% against the Warriors without Green playing). Yes, the 6-foot-7 Green is smaller than the 6-foot-10 Griffin. Yes, Green shoots 3-pointers. But Green is perfectly capable of defending big men. Griffin wouldn’t have intimidated him.

And the Clippers lost to Houston in part because they ran out of gas. The Clippers had a weak bench and had to rely too much on their starters. Even if they avoided a total collapse against the Rockets and won one of the series’ final three games, the Clippers would have faced the same fatigue issue in the next round. In fact, it likely would have been worse.

So why would Davis say this? Well, he’s a still a free agent and probably wants the Clippers to re-sign him. Flattering a would-be employer might help.

That, at least, is logical.

Martell Webster as stretch four? Wizards may try it next season.

Washington Wizards v Cleveland Cavaliers
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When the Washington Wizards tip-off next season, they will have Marcin Gortat at center and Nene at power forward.

But their moves this summer show that when one of those two sits (specifically Nene) the Wizards will embrace going small, as they did last playoffs when they blistered the Raptors in the first round. (Small-ball was less effective against the Hawks.) Washington let Kevin Seraphin walk to the Knicks this summer and replaced him with guys like Jared Dudley, a stretch four. (Paul Pierce left, but it was Otto Porter’s time.)

What about Martell Webster?

He may play some stretch four, too. But he is going to have to earn those minutes, notes J. Michael at CSNmidatlantic.com.

Webster played some (at the four) when he began his career with the Portland Trail Blazers and the Wizards have floated the  possibility of using him there when — if? — he can work his way back onto the court.

The challenge, of course, will be cracking the rotation that already has Drew Gooden, Jared Dudley and Alan Anderson expecting to log a majority of the time there behind Nene when the Wizards go to small-ball lineups.  Webster, who is 6-7, played in just 32 games last season which was his least since the 2008-09 season. It also was the first time since then that Webster didn’t log a start.

The challenge for Webster — and the Wizards as a whole — going small is on the defensive end. As Matt Moore pointed out in an interesting piece at CBSSports.com, the Wizards three-point shooting and offense was much better when they went small, but the Hawks defense neutralized that somewhat. Worse yet the small ball Wizards simply tried to outscore teams, their defense suffered. That can sometimes work, against certain lineups, but it is not a long-term solution. Look at it this way, the Warriors are champions because they can go small without sacrificing defensively (thanks to Draymond Green — that’s why he’s getting paid more than you, Tristan). That is hard to replicate.

Webster is going to have to stay healthy then actually knock down threes to see the court as a stretch four — you don’t help space the floor if nobody respects you from three.

But as the Wizards go small more often — at least we expect Randy Wittman to go small more — Webster will get a chance to prove he has a role with the team, and in a small-ball NBA.


Draymond Green blocking LeBron James, now as an emoji collage (PHOTO)

LeBron James, Draymond Green

Remember Draymond Green blocking LeBron James in overtime of Game 2 of the Finals?

Well, now that iconic image exists as an emoji collage, courtesy of Warriors social-media manager Julie Phayer:

Emojis are the most 2010s art form imaginable, but it sort of looks like an old mosaic. Very cool.