Tag: Golden State Warriors

2014 NBA Draft Lottery

Julius Erving: 76ers told me they were on seven-year plan


76ers coach Brett Brown said expected the team to draft Andrew Wiggins and Nik Stauskas last year and get good.

Brown was just off by a year or five.

Josh Harris bought the 76ers in 2011 and hired Sam Hinkie as general manager in 2013. Somewhere in there, somebody from the team expressed its plan to franchise legend Julius Erving.

Erving on SiriusXM:

When they acquired the team in 2012 maybe, I think the talk was about seven years. Seven years. So, I think it’s still on that same timeline.

Seven years to make the playoffs? Erving:

No. To be good. To be good. To be formidable. To be a contender. That’s probably 18-19.

That might seem like a long time, but it really isn’t that much longer than the typical rebuild.

The Warriors drafted Stephen Curry, decided to build around him and then won the championship six years later. Building a contender usually takes time.

The 76ers are obviously being quite patient, and I believe they’ll organically determine the right time to surge forward. I don’t see them rushing to sign mediocre free agents in five years just because they’re tired of losing. Once they have a strong group of young players, ideally anchored by a superstar, then they’ll use their assets – cap space and future draft picks – to acquire players capable of helping to win immediately.

That process has been delayed both for reasons in their control (trading Michael Carter-Williams) and out of their control (Joel Embiid’s injuries).

But I think they’ll stay true to the process – whether that means getting good before seven years are up or taking even longer.

I’d take seven years as an estimate on a very flexible plan.

News, notes for Summer League Wednesday: Willie Cauley-Stein active, still learning NBA game


The playoff/tournament/whatever you call it round of the NBA Las Vegas Summer League tipped off on Wednesday. Unlike the NBA, you don’t see an increase in intensity now that the playoffs have rolled around — these guys been playing for a job, auditioning for almost a week now. A paycheck is way more motivation than the Summer League crown.

There continue to be plenty of things happening in Vegas, here’s a roundup.

• It was a scary moment when Kings’ No. 6 pick Willie Cauley-Stein left the game Wednesday limping after he banged knees with James Michael McAdoo. After a little treatment and rest he was back in — a relief for a guy who had a lot of teams concerned about his injury potential. Cauley-Stein said he just banged knees.

Cauley-Stein has looked good at times in Vegas, he is incredibly active and athletic, but he may he suffers a little from the old John Wooden line “never mistake activity for achievement.” He needs work to recognize and make NBA-level defensive rotations. That activity isn’t going to work against veterans who know how to exploit it.

“I think Willie always plays hard and he’s still adjusting to the NBA game,” Kings’ Summer League coach John Welch said. “But one thing I love with Willie is you know every night you’re going to know what you get, he’s going to give you effort.”

• The Golden State Warriors beat the Kings on Wednesday to advance to the next round of the playoffs, and the team is coming together under Luke Walton (their coach). The Warriors could pull off the never-before-done NBA title then Summer League title back-to-back.

• Sixers’ rookie guard J.P. Tokoto is going to be battling for minutes with Robert Covington, Nik Stauskas, and Hollis Thompson come the season. He gets what his role will be and that he’s going to have to earn his run this season.

“I’m a realist, I know what it is coming into it,” Tokoto said when asked if he had conversations with the team about his role. “But yeah, we have talked about it — being a defensive guy. Coming in – whether it’s garbage time or giving a vet who is playing more minutes a breather — and disrupting the other team’s offense, attacking the rim on the offensive end, offensive rebounds, being a facilitator coming off a pick, or attacking the rim like I said. Just embracing the moment.”

• And Tokoto proved he can finish at the rim.

• Ryan Boatright, who has had a good Summer League trying to make the Nets (he has a partially guaranteed deal, just a $75K buyout), left the Nets game in the first half Wednesday with a shoulder injury after he took a flagrant foul from the Sixers Steve Zach (who threw a hip into him and knocked him flat during an inbound play).  Boatright came back in and took his free throws, but this is Summer League and there is no reason to make a guy play through injuries.

Just signed Pierre Jackson suited up for his first game for the Sixers, and his pink Kobe’s may have been the most impressive thing we saw from him.


Jackson finished with 9 points on 3-of-9 shooting, and was 0-of-4 from three.


• One thing you consistently hear from college players trying to adjust to the NBA game now is the constant movement of it. With a 24-second shot clock (not 35) and a defensive three seconds in the lane call, there is just a lot more motion and quicker action even in a Summer League game.

• All the big names from Duke’s national championship team — Jahlil Okafor, Justice Winslow, etc. — were absent from Summer League on Wednesday because they were all in Los Angeles for the ESPYs. Winslow is not playing anymore for the Heat this summer; it is unclear if Okafor returns for the Sixers.

Report: Cavaliers, Matthew Dellavedova still well apart on new contract

2015 NBA Finals - Game Three

Matthew Dellavedova was the breakout star of the first three games of the NBA Finals — his grit and tenacity was at the heart of Cleveland’s post-injuries grinding style. He was doing as well defending Stephen Curry as can be humanly expected. Well, until  Curry figured him and the Cavaliers out near the end of Game 3 (by Game 4 the Warriors had solved the riddle, and it was all over but the buckets). Walk around Cleveland and only LeBron James got more love than Delly.

But a few games of playoff success should not be confused with future earnings.

The Cavaliers and Dellavedova both want reach a new deal that keeps the reserve point guard being the guy off the bench behind Kyrie Irving (Dellavedova is a restricted free agent, the Cavs can match any offer he gets). But they are nowhere near a deal, reports Chris Mannix of Sports Illustrated.

Not much movement between the Cavaliers and Matthew Dellavedova on a new contract. A restricted free agent, Dellavedova is seeking a multiyear deal starting at $4 million per season, per a source, and the Cavs have balked, largely due to the enormous luxury tax implications that come with that type of contract. The market has largely dried up—Jeremy Lin’s deal with Charlotte closed a potential door—so it will be interesting to see how long this stalemate continues. Paging LeBron James.

It’s was always going to be hard for Dellavedova (or, more accurately, his agent) to secure an offer sheet from another team for the point guard because teams assumed the Cavs would just match. Why tie up your cap space for a few days to offer a player you’re not going to get?

Then there is the financial issue, which former Nets executive Bobby Marks explained (follow that game one twitter).

Yikes. Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert is going to be writing a payroll check in likely more than $200 million next season, once you figure in luxury taxes. To his credit, he didn’t balk at maxing out Kevin Love (or LeBron) and he the Cavs have spent to deepen the bench. But he’s drawing the line at overpaying for Tristan Thompson (who reportedly wants Draymond Green money) or Dellavedova.

Those guys are fan favorites, and more importantly LeBron favorites. But how much luxury tax do you want to pay for them?