Tag: Game of the Night

Memphis Grizzlies v Phoenix Suns

Game of the Night: Lakers get 2011 started on the right foot, then shoot it

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Grizzlies 104 Lakers 85: So many places to go with this one. The Lakers turned the ball over on 22% of their possessions. The Grizzlies outscored them in transition 28-5. The Grizzlies dominated on the offensive glass 28% to 16% of all available offensive rebounds grabbed. What I’m trying to tell you is that the Grizzlies kicked the crap out of the Lakers from baseline to baseline.  It should be noted, though, that Kobe Bryant’s third quarter explosion was what he thought was the only way to keep the Lakers in it, and also the reason the wheels came off the team. When Bryant opts to dominate the ball in an attempt to produce, the rest of the Lakers just watch him. It’s one thing to say the other Lakers are just standing around, not working for shots, but Bryant also shot early in the shot clock and in ISO situations, sometimes while facing three defenders. Someone was open. What’s worse, once the shots stopped falling, they lead to immediate transition opportunities, often unguarded. So Bryant took the wheel, drove through some battalions, then crashed the vehicle into a ditch filled with petrol and the ensuing debris set fire to the neighboring village. Whoops.

But to pick on Bryant is to ignore the complete and utter failure that was the Lakers’ offense and defense. The Lakers couldn’t be bothered tonight, and gave the corresponding performance.

For the Grizzlies, it was another display of how far they’ve grown, nestled in-between massive rollbacks of mediocrity. This team lost to the Nets and Kings in the past two weeks and have toppled the Lakers twice this season. If they could just play to their potential on consecutive nights, maybe they’d go somewhere.

Rudy Gay was particularly brilliant, nailing the baseline runner, the mid-range J, and an emphatic standing alley-oop that truly necessitates an “OH MY GOD.” In-between those he grabbed five rebounds and garnered three steals, his third three-plus-steals game in the past seven days. O.J. Mayo dropped 15 points, 5 assists and 2 steals to go alongside, and Mike Conley had the perfect Mike Conley game. 12 points on 7 shots, 5 rebounds, 6 assists, and 2 steals. He played within himself and kickstarted the offense. Throw in the fact that he managed two pick and roll assists that led to Marc Gasol and Darrel Arthur dunks, and it was a pretty fine night all around.

Hasheem Thabeet was the only Memphis player with a negative plus/minus, yet he guarded Pau Gasol for long stretches, and stranger still, the Lakers didn’t relentlessly go to Gasol in such situations, despite Gasol’s success in that situation.

Ron Artest played close to 25 minutes and finished with no points and 3 turnovers.

The Lakers will be fine, because that is what they do: “be fine.” But it won’t make this period any more fun for Lakers fans.


Game of the Night: Clippers keep Paul in check, stun Hornets

Eric Bledsoe, Chris Paul

Well, that was unexpected. Monday’s game was supposed to be more of a welcome-to-the-Hornets party for new acquisition Jarrett Jack, but an actual basketball game ended up taking place between the 11-1 Hornets and the 1-13 Clippers. That’s surprising enough; the stunning thing is that the Clippers actually ended up winning the game.

The Hornets went on an early run by forcing some turnovers and making some early jumpers. Blake Griffin was largely ineffective against the Hornets’ stifling paint defense in New Orleans; in Los Angeles, Griffin got himself going by making his first three mid-range jumpers and getting the crowd into the game with a huge transition dunk. Griffin didn’t have any other dunks in the game, but ended up with 24/13/4 by playing tough in the low post, staying patient offensively, and crashing the boards with abandon. Al-Faroq Aminu had a big first half as well, hitting some threes and getting out in transition early — all of his 16 points came in the first half.

After the Clippers went into the halftime break down only two points, everybody in Staples Center waited in fear of a massive New Orleans run that never came. Chris Paul looked oddly passive offensively, and looked to dump the ball to David West (who ended up with 30 points) when the Clippers switched rather than try to attack himself. Paul was mostly quiet after making some early jumpers, and finished with only 14 points and 6 assists.

The fourth quarter was about as ugly as it gets, but the Clippers held on thanks to some huge plays from Brian Cook (yes, that Brian Cook), some very gritty defense to force New Orleans turnovers, and some huge offensive rebounds — the Clippers had five offensive boards in the fourth quarter alone, and the two biggest plays of the game were a Blake Griffin put-back of his own miss to cut the New Orleans lead and a Ryan Gomes tip-in that gave the Clippers a lead they would end up holding for the rest of the game. It looked like the Clippers were in danger of giving the game away with some stupid turnovers and absolutely putrid free throw shooting (the Clippers shot 50.7% from the field and 17-34 from the line, incredibly), but they ultimately hung onto the game by simply outworking the heavily favored Hornets.

After the game, Chris Paul was disappointed with his team’s effort, especially on the defensive end:

“Defensively, we’ve been engaged for the most part. But these past three or four games, we’ve just been winning — we’ve just been getting by. They say winning cures all. But, hopefully with this loss we’ll get back to paying attention to what we’ve got to do as a unit defensively.”

For the Clippers, the win was a much-needed shot in the arm after some very tough losses in close games. When asked about how the Clippers were finally able to close out a win, Eric Gordon put it simply:

“Well, it was just time for us to grow up a little bit. We had a couple mistakes in this game, and the difference is that we didn’t relax, we just kept on going and fighting hard and the game came to us.”

The Clippers only have two wins this year, but they’ve come against two probable playoff contenders in the Hornets and the Oklahoma City Thunder. After the game, Blake Griffin was happy about the way the Clippers have been able to stun some top teams this year, but he’d like the team to be a little more consistent:

“It’s good [to beat Oklahoma City and New Orleans]. It gives us confidence, but at the same time we have to win the games in between as well. Like I said, it’s good to beat a team with a good record, but it would also be better to beat the teams with the okay records.”

Whether or not the Clippers can find that consistency while continuing to battle injuries remains to be seen. But on this night, the Clippers showed that they can beat any team in this league if they play the way they’re capable of playing and the planets align.

Game of the Night: Suns bury Lakers with 22 threes

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What a crazy game in Los Angeles. The Phoenix Suns managed to hand the Lakers their first home loss of the season despite losing their starting center (and the only Phoenix player who would have had a chance of keeping the Lakers off the boards) early in the game, but it was far from easy. Even though the Suns hit 22 of their 40 three-point attempts, one make shy of an NBA record, the Suns needed a crazy three from Hedo Turkoglu and a controversial technical on Lamar Odom to escape Los Angeles with a five-point win.

For the majority of the game, it seemed like the Suns were simply delaying an inevitable Laker blowout. Phoenix’s big men had little hope of keeping the Lakers away from the basket before Robin Lopez went down with a knee injury — after that happened, things just became comical. The Lakers got to the rim seemingly at will for much of the game, using crisp passing, strong drives, and lots of movement off the ball to get easy looks at the rim over and over and over again. Lamar Odom was particularly effective when he put the ball on the floor and went to the basket, and the Suns had no prayer against Pau Gasol when he got the ball near the rim. On top of that, Kobe was being Kobe, whether he was setting his teammates up with crisp passes, making shots from the mid-post, or up-faking his man, stepping through him, and passing off the backboard to himself for a layup.

When the Lakers missed a shot, they would often just get the ball right back again — Channing Frye had no prayer of effectively boxing out Pau Gasol, Lamar Odom kept coming out of nowhere to grab the ball after Laker misses, and the Suns were simply unable to gain possession of loose caroms for most of the game.

After the game, Suns coach Alvin Gentry talked about his team’s inability to keep Gasol off the boards, saying “You know we’ve still got to try and stop the rebounding situation, but Pau is just so long, we have him boxed out, he goes over the back but doesn’t foul…he’s just so long, our guys try to get a body on him and we just couldn’t. It wasn’t that we weren’t trying to win, that we weren’t playing hard and trying to be physical with him, we just couldn’t move him out. And that’s a credit to Pau more than it is a negative to our guys.”

The Lakers’ size advantage was overpowering — the Lakers outscored the Suns by 40 points in the paint, and had 20 offensive rebounds to the Suns’ 22 defensive rebounds. 99 times out of 100, the team that controls the paint like the Lakers did on Sunday will win the game, but that wasn’t the case against the Suns.

How did the Suns overcome the Lakers’ size and strength mismatch? They hit threes. A lot of them. The Suns found themselves open from beyond the arc early and often against the Lakers, and their shooters weren’t afraid to let fly. The Suns did a great job of moving the ball from side to side, staying away from isolation play, spacing the floor, and keeping the Lakers off-balance in both the half-court and transition game. The Laker forwards were able to overpower the Suns when Los Angeles had the ball, but they often seemed a step slow on the opposite side of the floor, either leaving Channing Frye or Hedo Turkoglu open beyond the arc or being forced to switch onto a guard. Lamar Odom had a particularly uneven defensive game — there were times he would go to give help and appear to simply forget that Channing Frye and Hedo Turkoglu love to shoot threes.

Jason Richardson, Channing Frye, and Hedo Turkoglu absolutely killed the Lakers from deep by camping out on the weak side in the half-court and trailing the break — that kind of shooting would be impressive in an empty gym, but it also seemed like the Lakers were giving up open three-point looks because they thought the Suns would eventually start missing and they could simply outscore Phoenix when the Suns started to miss.

Unfortunately for the Lakers, the Suns never stopped missing. During one four-and-a-half minute stretch in the third quarter, the Suns made six straight three-pointers, and it got to the point where the Staples center crowd would begin groaning as the shots were in the air. When asked after the game if he thought the Suns’ three-point shooting would cool down, Kobe Bryant said “that’s what normally happens, but tonight it didn’t. They just continued to make them.”

A stretch like that would have buried most teams, but the Lakers were resilient, and were in the game for most of the fourth quarter thanks to some big threes from Shannon Brown and some missed threes by the Suns. The turning point of the game was a controversial one. With 53 seconds remaining, Lamar Odom made a layup that put the Lakers down by two points. There was some contact on the play, and Odom wanted to get an and-1 call and a chance to bring the Lakers within a point. He didn’t get the call, and was fairly demonstrative to the ref, who slapped him with a technical. After the Suns hit the resulting free throw and Hedo Turkoglu nailed a deep, flat-footed, contested three over Kobe Bryant on the next Suns possession, the game was all but over.

After the game, Kobe called the technical on Odom “disgusting, in that situation.” Odom himself said “It’s tough, you know, it’s tough. There were 55 seconds left. I think that’s why people are questioning it. But a rule’s a rule.”

After the game, both coaches were in awe of Phoenix’s hot shooting. Phil Jackson said in his post-game press conference that “Our philosophy is that [the three-pointers] even out over time, but they didn’t tonight. A team’s going to make a certain percentage of threes. If they make ten in a ball game that’s a high number; this team averages 9, so that’s a really high number. The real issue is about those other 80 points they got in the paint.”

Suns coach Alvin Gentry was of the opinion that Sunday’s outcome was more the  result of Phoenix’s insanely hot shooting rather than anything the Lakers did wrong. When asked about the Lakers, who have dropped their last two games, Gentry went into a comic outrage, saying “It’s one game! We made 22 threes, and still had to hold them off at the end! People are talking like their season is over!” before breaking into a wide smile. The Lakers were a little nonchalant defensively against the Suns and gave Phoenix more good looks than they should have had, but the fact the Lakers were in this game up until Phoenix’s 22nd three is a far more significant long-term takeaway than their two straight losses. The Lakers are good. Scary good. But for one night, Phoenix’s near-historic shooting allowed them to be just a little bit better.