Tag: free agency


Nets sign point guard Armon Johnson to 10-day contract

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Via NetsDaily’s Net Income:

Armon Johnson, who the Nets looked at before the 2010 draft, has been signed to a 10-day contract, bringing to 22 the number of players who’ve worn the Nets uniform this season.

A 6’3″ point guard, Johnson played 38 games for the Trail Blazers in 2010-11, averaging 2.9 ppg, shooting better than 40% from deep. He played then in one game this season after being called up from the Idaho Stampede. He is 23 years old and played college ball at Nevada.

With Jordan Farmar declared out for the year last week, the Nets need some additional minutes at point guard, so they’re giving Johnson a shot. Considering the success Gerald Green has had since the Nets decided to take a flyer on him, this could end up being a great chance for Johnson to get some real minutes and prove he belongs in the NBA.

Cavs might bring back Jamison next season

Antawn Jamison

When the Cavaliers traded for Antawn Jamison, it was supposed to be the move that brought them a championship, the final piece of the puzzle for LeBron James to bring a title to Cleveland. Instead, Jamison never showed the ability he had when he was younger, couldn’t adjust to the system fast enough, and had his tail kicked in by Kevin Garnett. Then he was a big contract on a losing team after LeBron journeyed to the center of his ego down in Miami. For two years he’s been the biggest name (at least until two weeks into this season when it became clear Kyrie Irving is the mother freaking truth) in Cleveland, a low-efficiency scorer that most Cavs fans have been frustrated with, from a usage and production standpoint.

But he’s played well overall. He’s contributed. The Cavaliers have hung around the 8th spot in the East for most of the season, and Jamison has been a big part of that. And Jamison has been a benefit to the Cavs’ culture. He’s a locker room leader and someone to help mentor the younger players. He’s taken an active role in mentoring Tristan Thompson, something he was under no obligation to do.

And as much as the Cavaliers rightfully shopped him at the trade deadline, they didn’t move his expiring contract. Not only that, but The Morning Journal in Ohio reports that the Cavs could bring back Jamison next year for a lesser salary hit.

With that being said, it’s not totally out of the question that they re-sign Jamison to a cap-friendly contract starting around $5 million. The Cavs would have to be clear with the 6-foot-9, 235-pounder that they are committed to Tristan Thompson as being the starter at power forward next year.

If Jamison would agree to come off the bench and continue to mentor young players like Thompson, it wouldn’t be totally outlandish for him to return.

via NBA INSIDER: Cavs would welcome back Jamison – morningjournal.com.

Jamison might get some bigger offers from contenders. He might get an offer from a team looking to give him slightly more for what he did in Cleveland this year. But him finishing his career in the relative quiet of Cleveland might be a great situation for him. It does show you that there’s value to players beyond shots and rebounds. And if the Cavs were to eventually win a title, Jamison is one of those guys who really deserve it for the upstanding way he’s handled his career.

Chris Kaman sticks with Hornets, which is fine. For now.

Chris Kaman, Nene
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From ESPN.com’s Marc Stein:


Players waived by 11:59 PM ET tonight eligible for playoffs w/another team, but ESPN sources say NOH & Chris Kaman still NOT talking buyout

— Marc Stein (@ESPNSteinLine) March 23, 2012

So… real quick. Taking on the rest of the year for Kaman isn’t bad. He still makes plays (he blocked the ever-loving crap out of Blake Griffin the other night). He can still provide the team with value and it’s better to have the expiring than players of only marginal improvement for longer-term.

The reservation has to come with continued talks of extending Kaman after the season. The Hornets need to go blisteringly young. Kaman’s going to demand a pretty decent salary because he’s tall and can walk and chew gum at the same time. In this league that’s gold. Throw on him actually being marginally talented and you have to think the offers will come rolling in. The Hornets, however, do not need the veteran stylings of one Mr. Chris Kaman. They need the project long-term stylings of one Mr. Andre Drummond (should Anthony Davis and his salvation-by-unibrow not appear through the lottery) or some sort. Even if the move Emeka Okafor, having Kaman on as a transition big man to mentor the young kid is going to be too expensive.

There’s a little too much emphasis placed on cap room these days. Not everyone can have a bajillion dollars of cap space and if they do, they still have to reach the salary floor. Paying players is something that’s worth doing. But it’s hard to see how Kaman is going to work out long-term. For this season, it’s fine, if for no other reason than it helps to get the front office’s respect back as a managing entity under Stern. But beyond this season, unless the Hornets have a massive makeover towards veterans or Kaman is feeling generous about staying in the Big Easy, they need to be very careful with how they proceed.

Nuggets sign Wilson Chandler for five-years, complete Ujiri’s master plan of athletic wing army

Wilson Chandler, Kobe Bryant

Took them long enough, but Denver got their guy.

The Denver Post reported Sunday that the Nuggets have signed free agent Wilson Chandler:

Chandler spent the year in China expecting a prolonged lockout, then was released from his contract when his team was eliminated from play in the CBA and allowed to return stateside. There had been questions if Denver would bring him back with the emergence of Danilo Gallinari and the acquisitions of Corey Brewer and Rudy Fernandez. But Denver knew they could get get good value on Chandler, and brought him back.

The deal is reportedly five-years, $37 million which puts it above the $30 million mark reported earlier but still significantly cheaper than what teams pay for worse players (oh, hi Orlando, didn’t see you there). It now means that the Nuggets have a wing rotation of:

Arron Afflalo

Danilo Gallinari

Wilson Chandler

Rudy Fernandez

Corey Brewer

Jordan Hamilton

and they play some two-point-guard lineups with Andre Miller as well. This after the Nuggets had questions about whether they would be able to field the minimum roster at the start of the year. The Nuggets are deep, but the same questions they’ve had remain. Chandler had the ability to score 40 under Mike D’Antoni in New York, but struggled to adjust in Denver, especially in the playoffs last year. They still lack a go-to guy. But having Chandler for depth and versatility is a great get. He’s still in a good place in terms of youth and health, and has a great skillset.

Another good move for Denver.

In case you needed it, more proof Dwight’s decision making Wednesday night was absurd

Dwight Howard

I’m about to share with you a few paragraphs from a must-read piece on the Dwight Howard debacle of this week by ESPN”s Michael Wallace, and then we’re going to talk about it for a minute.

But 86-year-old Magic owner Rich DeVos confirmed Friday that an 11th-hour conference call he had with Howard on Wednesday night played a role in keeping the league’s best center in Orlando. It was during that call, as the Magic were in San Antonio to play the Spurs, when as many as 17 people were on the line. That group included DeVos’ grandchildren, one as young as age 16, who weighed in on the ordeal.

Orlando’s front-office executives also participated. It was during a 15-minute segment of the call when DeVos finally informed Howard that unless he was willing to stay through next season, he would otherwise be traded in the next few hours.

“I think that’s when he realized,” DeVos, bound to a wheelchair, said of the conversation while sitting in the locker room after Friday’s win. “He wanted to talk to each and every one of us. He talked to everybody in the family. That’s the way he’s always been.”

Howard conceded that the conference call did sway his decision. By the time the Magic’s chartered plane landed in Orlando in the wee hours Thursday, Howard had informed the team he would bypass the early termination option in his contract.

via Conference call made Howard’s decision a dunk – ESPN.

Wait, what?

A 16-year-old is weighing in on a decision that has monstrous impacts on the future of Howard’s life? The Magic are bringing in the owners’ grandkids to talk to Howard about this deal? Did Mickey get to say his peace? When Pinocchio said that Dwight could win a title with Glen Davis and Jason Richardson making that much money, did his nose grow? Is this thing airing on ABC Family or are we going low-budget feature film release?

And he listened! This is his thought process!

Don’t get all bent out of shape on my reaction here. Howard staying is a good thing. Kind of. I like it when players reveal they at least care a little bit about the organizations who have pretty much bent their entire lives backwards for their star players. Howard was genuinely hurt at the perception that he doesn’t care about the Magic organization and the DeVos family. That’s a good thing. He deserves credit for his loyalty.

(Side note: Howard said at his presser, and again after the Magic’s win over the hapless Nets that he’s glad it’s over. What is over, exactly? Dude, you’re still entering free agency, you’re not re-signing the contract, this thing could just go on another year. I understand you think everyone’s going to leave you alone about it now, but, um, unless you sign the extension, that’s not happening.)

My point is just that on top of the back and forth, back and forth, back, then back again nature of his decision making between Wednesday and Thursday, this is how the Magic organization handled it, this is how Dwight chose to handle it. It’s a weird story of family and business overlapping. The more we learn about this process the more it becomes clear this wasn’t about business and sponsorships and jerseys, for Howard or for the DeVos family. This was emotional. The problem is that when you make business decisions from a place of emotion?

That rarely works out well.