Tag: free agency

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The Inbounds: The Knick problem isn’t Lin, it’s consistency


So Jeremy Lin is  a Rocket, no longer a Knick. That actually happened. The Knicks elected not to match the three-year, $25.1 million offer sheet from the Houston Rockets and for Knicks fans who loved Lin, this is awful, terrible, gut-wrenching stuff. For everyone else, it’s a lot of fun. Why? Because it makes for terrific arguing over whether it was the right move.

“You have no idea if Lin was worth that kind of money! What if he’s a bust?!”

“How can you just let a guy who did what he did for them walk without getting anything in return?!”

“They chose Jason Kidd and Raymond Felton, along with J.R. Smith and Marcus Camby over Lin?!”

“Lin could have returned if he wanted to! It was his choice!”

Yes, the volume will be up on sports talk radio, blogs, and barrooms in New York and all across the land that was made for you and me today as we try and suss out whether letting Lin leave was a good move or a disaster.

But a pretty solid way of finding the truth on this matter is that the decision was both good and bad. It was great in a vacuum and terrible in context.

Look, there’s just not a lot of ways to define Jeremy Lin as a player worth $25.1 million. You can take the marketing angle, which says that Lin will bring in so much revenue that it will vastly outweigh the price of his salary over three years. He’s immensely popular, in a way few players ever reach, because of his story, and his play style. But that was also based on his success. Jeremy Lin wasn’t self-evidently popular (though he was a cult-hero in Golden State, particularly with the Asian-American fanbase) prior to setting the world on fire that month this season. It was the points, the assists, and the wins that made him into the star he wound up as.  If that goes away, outside of New York, outside of last February, outside of the friendly confines of Mike D’Antoni’s system, then the Rockets will have set themselves up for the biggest stretch provision candidate you’re going to see.

You can argue his play warranted it, but Lin was a turnover-prone, isolation-heavy point guard who was surrounded by Tyson Chandler and, laugh all you want, Steve Novak and Landry Fields, players that fit his playstyle perfectly. That isn’t to say the Rockets don’t have shooters like Novak and Fields, they have better ones. But chemistry matters, fit matters, and Lin did have some significant holes in his game, particularly when it came to holding onto the ball. When defenses started to figure out how to more aggressively trap him on the pick and roll, things changed. Can he adjust enough to warrant that contract?

So yeah, as Melo said, the contract is “ridiculous” and on those grounds, the Knicks were absolutely correct in not matching the offer.They showed patience, prudence, and long-term considerations when declining to keep Lin. Good for them.

The problem?

When have the Knicks ever shown patience, prudence, or long-term consideration in anything?

In the past two years, they have taken all the cap space they had, all the flexibility, and brought in injury-prone Amar’e Stoudemire, ISO-so-much-coaches-want-to-fine-me-except-my-agent’s-agency-runs-the-team Carmelo Anthony, Tyson Chandler hurtling towards the end of his career, and then decided to really top off the gas tanks with deals for Jason Kidd, Raymond Felton, J.R. Smith, Marcus Camby, and Steve Novak. Obviously, you have to field a complete roster and they wanted quality players. But if the Knicks are splurging at the rate they are, why was this the dividing line? Why is James Dolan willing to cross any bridge, burn any field, and toss out whatever coin he has the whimsy to toss in order to put players on the Knicks, but the guy who legitimately set the town and the world on fire is too much because of the cap hit in three years, when you can move him?

Keep that in mind. In three years, when the $15 million “poison pill” knocks whoever has Lin’s contract on their butts, there will have been enough time to either determine that Lin is resoundingly worth the investment, or shop him out however they choose. And if you can’t move him, use the stretch provision to ease the luxury tax burden. Guess what? You’re already going to drown in luxury tax then anyway. You know why? You gave Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire a bazillion dollars. There are consequences. And through all that, you’ve brazenly torn through the consequences. The Knicks make more money than God, but this, factoring in the marketing potential scared them off?

So that’s what has to frustrate fans. The Knicks have been willing to throw good money after bad for over a decade and yet they’re unwilling to do so on something that legitimately made the fans happy?

The truth of it likely comes down to a question of practicality and principle. The Rockets upped the offer in the middle of the moratorium, a no-no, apparently, and not matching was how they stood their ground. Every business has to have a threshold of what it’s willing to spend. The Rockets just so happened to find the Knicks’. But when we look at the whole picture, and see the excessiveness of the Dolan era, it has to be baffling to realize that the one time when the Knicks weren’t willing to make a bad decision, it was the one time they could have at least made their fans happy.

Jeremy Lin is a Rocket, no longer a Knick. And despite doing a very un-Knick-like thing, the Knicks are still the Knicks.

Knicks sign-and-trade for Raymond Felton, is Jeremy Lin on the way out?

New York Knicks' Lin pumps his fist from the bench as teammates score during their NBA basketball game in Toronto

Things went from “easy and predictable” to completely insane Saturday night in Gotham. It had been a few days since things with the Knicks had seemed berserk, so of course, all that detonated as news broke that the Knicks’ point guard situation could be altered dramatically in a matter of hours.

Here’s a rundown of how this happened.

Late Saturday night, a television reporter in South Carolina tweeted that he had spoken with free agent point guard and former New York Knick Raymond Felton and the guard told him that he was headed to New York in a sign-and-trade and that Jeremy Lin would not have his 3-year, $25 million offer sheet from the Rockets matched by the Knicks. Chaos ensued.

Then the New York Daily News reported that the Knicks had in fact reached out to Felton to discuss a deal and sign-and-trade, giving the report from South Carolina credence.

Yahoo Sports reported the deal was close and that Jeremy Lin was “close to being a Rocket.” 

The New York Daily News reported that the deal was done, with Felton and Kurt Thomas headed from Portland to New York for Dan Gadzuric and Jared Jeffries. CBSSports.com confirmed the trade. Yahoo Sports reported that the Knicks would give Felton a 3-year, $10 million contract.

The New York Post reports that a source indicates the Knicks will not match the offer. Every other outlet is staying quiet on that matter for now, waiting on confirmation.

That’s a huge question looming for both the Knicks and the Rockets.

For the Knicks, it’s a stunning move away from both the player who set the sporting world on fire for a few weeks in late winter, a financial boomtown all by himself due to marketing potential, and from their long insistence that they would match any offer made for Lin. It was a guarantee that Lin would be a Knick, by most sources. Now it appears as if it’s very possible that the richest team in the land is being scared off by the fear of the luxury tax hitting them in three years, when the structure of a matched contract for Lin would result in $15 million owed to the point guard.

It has long been thought that the Knicks couldn’t care less about the luxury tax. This would render all of that false.

Even more complicated still is the prospect of the Knicks matching for Lin. It would mean a three-point-guard rotation, with J.R. Smith signed to the two-guard spot and Iman Shumpert expected back early next year. Where does Jason Kidd fit into that plan? Would the Knicks play Felton, Lin, or Kidd at the 2-guard spot as a reserve? What role does Felton fit in? How would Lin fit in with his relative inexperience next to Raymond Felton and Jason Kidd?

Why would they sign three point guards at that level and price?

The questions go on and on and still have to be answered.

For the Rockets, there are huge questions about how it impacts their chase of Dwight Howard and the questions remain in flux as we try and get a handle on the situation. There are indications that the deal could sink the trade for Howard, or have no impact on it whatsoever. What is clear is that if the Bulls do not match the offer sheet Houston signed Omer Asik to, there’s going to be a huge chunk reserved in terms of space, and the Rockets would be unable to trade either player until December 15th, meaning they’re running out of options to trade for Howard.

The Blazers got a second round pick and some roster filler for a point guard they weren’t going to retain. No big deal for them.

The Knicks have one of the biggest choices of their franchise in front of them, and the implications either way could be massive. Lin could be massively overpaid, having only excelled in a handful of games last season. Letting him go could be a killer with the kind of skillsets and physical conditions Felton and Kidd bring with them. This is a monstrous decision for the Knicks, and the stakes are as high as they can be.

We know Raymond Felton is back as a Knick. Everything else we’re still working on.

Hornets match Eric Gordon’s offer sheet on Saturday

Eric Gordon

Update 6:16 p.m.: The Hornets officially matched the offer this afternoon. Gordon is under contract to the New Orleans Hornets for four years. Damage control time!

The Hornets weren’t kidding around. They weren’t bluffing, joshing, yanking anyone’s chain or pulling anyone’s leg. They were always serious, and on Saturday, they’re making it real. They’re matching the Suns’ offer sheet for Gordon.

From the Times Picayune:

Although Eric Gordon proceeded with his exit plan after expressing his desire to play for the Phoenix Suns, the Hornets are expected to match the Suns’ four-year, $58 million offer sheet today to retain him, sources confirmed.

Gordon signed the Suns’ offer sheet Wednesday and the Hornets had three days to match. By using their entire 72-hour allotted time, they prevented the Suns from pursuing other players in free agency because Phoenix does not have enough salary-cap space to accommodate Gordon and another addition.

via New Orleans Hornets expected to match Phoenix Suns’ offer for Eric Gordon today | NOLA.com.

This is not brain surgery. You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to figure this out. Something else involving a complex and high-level intelligence necessary for a profession. Eric Gordon is a top-five shooting guard in this league (which may say more about the quality of shooting guards in this league, but he’s still very good), and the Hornets traded Chris Paul for him, among other things. The Hornets believe he is the star of their future next to Anthony Davis, and have no intention of letting him walk just because he decided to pout on the front lawn for a few days about not getting to go where he wanted.

His heart may be in Phoenix, but his shoe laces will be in New Orleans. Gordon’s a professional, and in all likelihood there will be no problems, especially after Gordon gets a chance to see how good Anthony Davis is. The Hornets have a good plan in place, and that’s going to lead to wins. And wins convince guys to stay more than anything.

So Gordon gets re-signed, gets his money, the Hornets get their star. If he really wants to make a fuss, then he can, and Demps and Williams might facilitate a trade. But that doesn’t seem like who Eric Gordon is. As it stands, this works out for everyone, despite Gordon’s disappointment.

Also, pretty hilarious that the Hornets intentionally waited to punish the Suns for signing their guy to an offer sheet. Gotta love the chess match.

Joe Johnson says the Nets are ‘definitely’ better than the Knicks. Here we go.

Joe Johnson

Let the Battle for the Basketball Boroughs commence. We’re headed for a new rivalry, as the Nets and Knicks face off for the soul of hoops in Gotham, and the Nets have no plans to enter the arena humbly nor quietly. At a pep rally in Brooklyn introducing Joe Johnson, Johnson told reporters that the Nets are “definitely” the best team in New York, via the New York Daily News.

And he was the tame one. the Brooklyn Borough President had a ton of things to say about the Knicks.

“For nearly 40 years the Manhattan Knicks have shown they can’t bring a championship to New York, so it’s going to take the Brooklyn Nets to get the job done,” Markowitz said. “So move over Manhattan — enough air balls. You had your chance.”

“Now that the Barclays Center is in town, the national basketball spotlight is focused on Brooklyn’s big stage and Madison Square Garden just doesn’t have the same sparkle anymore,” said Markowitz, comparing it to the old rivalry between the Brooklyn Dodgers and Yankees. “By the way, for any Brooklynites still rooting for the Manhattan Knicks: as of November and on, I’m giving you fair warning: it’s treason to support the outer borough’s team over our Brooklyn Nets.

“Besides, when it comes down to it, we all know the Brooklyn Nets will shut down the Manhattan Knicks when they play for the first time.”

via Joe Johnson says Nets ‘definitely’ the best team in New  York as Brooklyn declares all-out hoops war on Manhattan  – NY Daily News.

Comes off as a little little-brother-ish, does it not? “We’re totally better than you!” Better teams go out and show it. Like the Heat. Oh, wait. No. That’s not right. Bad example. Or the Celtics. They never talk about how good they ar… nope, that doesn’t work either. Anyway, this is going to be a beast of a rivalry for the next three years until Amar’e Stoudemire can’t walk and Joe Johnson is making $25 million and shooting 40 percent, then it’s going to seem a little sad. But for right now?

You can make the argument for either side, especially the Knicks. It’s not just that they have arguably the best overall player in Carmelo Anthony, but they have a better defensive system. Amar’e Stoudemire’s injury problems aren’t sure to repeat themselves, and even if they do, he can still contribute. Tyson Chandler may be the difference maker, though, as a better overall defensive player. The Knicks were a great defensive team last year, and with another year together, plus a full year with Jeremy Lin, there’s a chance the Knicks’ offense could come together. Compare that with the inexperience of the Nets and “Manhattan” has the edge.

But you could easily make an argument for Brooklyn.

Oh, and in that same article, Billy King’s quoted as saying Deron Williams and Joe Johnson is a better backcourt than the Lakers’ combo of Steve Nash and Kobe Bryant.

So much fun!

Cavaliers could make an amnesty bid on Luis Scola

Luis Scola

ESPN reports that the Cavaliers are considering making an amnesty bid on Luis Scola. The minimum bid on Scola’s $21 million remaining is $3 million the first season and a $10 million total. The Mavericks are also interested, despite picking up Elton Brand off the wire.

The idea of the Cavs picking up Scola is very interesting. They have Anderson Varejao, and the idea has been floated that if the Cavaliers got Scola, they’d trade Varejao. The complicating factor here is Tristan Thompson. Some in the Cavs organization think that Thompson can float at the five. Scola would be a poor fit at the four. They could also throw out Tyler Zeller if they needed to. But trying to slide Scola into Varejao’s spot would cause issues as Scola’s rebounding abilities deteriorate with age.

It’s definitely worth the money, though, with the Cavaliers need for veterans to bring the young team to the next step and losing Antawn Jamison in free agency. The Mavericks have roughly $4 million left in cap space after acquiring Elton Brand. That might be enough, but if the Cavs come in with an offer over $4, they can nab him, unless someone else gets itchy. Scola’s likely to be the top amnesty prospect since the process was implemented in last December’s CBA.

In the off chance that Scola slips through the cracks of the wire and becomes a free agent, a virtual impossibility, the Spurs and Heat would both be interested in adding him. Scola was actually drafted by the Spurs, one of the few times they let a talented foreign player slip from their grasp.

(Basically, if there is a veteran free agent who can still walk without prosthetics, the Heat are interested, just a heads up.)