Tag: free agency


The Hornets may or may not have overpaid for their frontcourt


The Hornets landed Carl Landry back in New Orleans the same day they traded Chris Paul for 1 year at $9 million. That’s not terrible, but it’s a bit much for Landry’s production. Then the Hornets brought back Jason Smith on Friday for three-years at $2.5 mllion per year. That’s not a bad bargain given what he provided last year. Then again, with Emeka Okafor they’re paying $24 million-ish for a very underwhelming frontcourt. Not the worst in the league. Not even a bad one. Just very mediocre.

Landry’s rebounding doesn’t give them much as a power forward, and Smith’s biggest asset is really as a pick and pop player where he was surprisingly good last season. Alongside Eric Gordon and Al-Farouq Aminu, along with Chris Kaman’s $12.7 million contract, that’s a lot of dough for a team that’s going to be firmly in the lottery. Then again, they do have to reach the salary floor, so the money’s got to go somewhere

In reality, the Hornets probably got pretty good value. Landry’s one-year deal is ideal, as it means they’ll have room to continue the rebuilding process. That means with Kaman the Hornets will cleary $21 million in cap space in a single season. Pretty good with an extension for Eric Gordon on the horizon, if he’ll take it.

The Hornets won their opening game in preseason Friday night. They have not lost since trading Chris Paul.

That’s like, a joke, or whatever.

Cavaliers use amnesty clause on Baron Davis

Miami Heat v Cleveland Cavaliers

The Cleveland Cavaliers have officially announced that they have used their team’s “amnesty clause” on Baron Davis, and waived the 32-year old guard from their roster. Davis’ current contract will pay him 13.95 million dollars this season, and Davis has a player option for 14.85 million next season. Davis will still make that money, but his contract will no longer count against Cleveland’s salary cap figures.

Davis, along with what turned out to be the #1 overall pick in the 2011 draft, was traded to the Cavaliers for Mo Williams last season, and the Cavaliers did play significantly better after acquiring Davis. Davis’ three-point shooting was abnormally good in Cleveland — a career 32% three-point shooter, Davis shot 41.4% from deep in his 15 games with the Cavaliers.

That late-season shooting surge will make Davis enticing to a number of top teams who are currently without a great option at point guard, namely the Lakers, Heat, and Knicks. Size, passing ability, and outside shooting ability are what allows guards to play well once they get on the wrong side of 30 — Davis has always been a big guard (and has often shown up to training camps a bit too big), and has always passed well, but he has traditionally made his teams suffer by settling for a lot of outside shots and making very few of them.

If Davis’ 3-point shooting in Cleveland comes with him to his next team, he will help them — if it doesn’t, he could end up throwing away possessions for teams that have some great scorers on their rosters. (If you don’t believe NBA GMs are capable of having short memories when it comes to a player’s ability to shoot the 3, remember how much money Trevor Ariza made after he got hot from deep in the 2009 playoffs.)

Davis would have helped take some pressure off of #1 pick Kyrie Irving if he’d stayed in Cleveland, and Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert has been a very vocal opponent of letting the NBA’s best teams get better at the expense of small-market teams, so I’m inclined to believe that Davis either asked the Cavaliers to let him go or showed up to camp in such iffy shape that the Cavaliers don’t believe he’ll provide much help to whatever contender ultimately signs him. Of course, Davis was making a lot of money and providing relatively little production, so it’s possible that Dan Gilbert and Chris Grant might simply have plans for how to improve the team now that Davis’ contract no longer counts against their salary cap.

Bobcats sign Reggie Williams to 2-year, $5 million deal.


According to Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski, the Charlotte Bobcats have signed former Golden State Warriors swingman Reggie Williams to a 2-year deal worth 5 million dollars. The 25-year old former D-league player averaged 9.2 points on 46.9% shooting from the field and 42.3% shooting from deep last season, and averaged 15.2 points on 49.5% shooting in his first NBA season. Williams’ defense has been an issue, but he was playing in Golden State, where defense was not a priority.

Given how much mid-level free agents in their 20s or early 30s can cost, this looks like a smart signing for Charlotte. Williams can create shots and knock down open threes quite well, he’s versatile offensively, and his price tag looks very reasonable when you consider that his former team just paid $7 million for one year of Kwame Brown, or look at what other reasonably effective free-agent swingmen around the league have been getting paid.

Williams won’t make a game-changing impact for Charlotte, but they appear to have acquired a solid player without having to pay too much, which is a very rare thing in NBA free agency.

Dwight Howard wants out of Orlando because they didn’t let him run the team badly

Dwight Howard

See, here’s my problem.

Carmelo Anthony had it right. For all his ego, for all the manipulation, for holding the Nuggets and the news cycle hostage for six months, he had it right. It was quiet. He never committed to the Nuggets, kept it quiet, didn’t make it worse. Melo knows it’s a business and acted as such. Anthony was cold, calculating, and brutal in his decision making.

Dwight Howard wants you to like him. It’s not enough that he plays basketball better than all but about maybe two people on Earth, he has to be loved. And as abandoning the franchise that has repeatedly gone into the luxury tax, and gone to the voters to get you a new arena is typically frowned upon, Dwight is doing the whole big long act. There’s a whole speech you’re supposed to give, about how much you love the city and the fans, about how hard it is for you. None of this ever stops the departure, mind you, it always happens along the same timeline.

But Dwight’s a little different in one way. He’s not blaming it on business, or his heart, or wanting to win. No, no. He’s doing it because he didn’t get to play general manager. From ESPN:

Dwight Howards trade demand from the Orlando Magic is due in part to the organization not granting his requests for specific trades and signings over the last several years, the All-Star center said Sunday night.

Howard requested a trade during several meetings last week and has been given permission by the Magic to have contact with the New Jersey Nets, Los Angeles Lakers and Dallas Mavericks. He went public with the demand Saturday and then followed that up with a strong explanation Sunday, referring to an eroding relationship with Magic general manager Otis Smith.

“If you dont have a good relationship with the people you work with, how are you going to get better?”– Dwight Howard”Im pretty sure if you go down the line of teams, every GM has a pretty good relationship with not just the best player but all the players,” Howard said. “If you dont have a good relationship with the people you work with, how are you going to get better?”

via Dwight Howard of Orlando Magic cites poor relationship with GM as reason for trade demand – ESPN.

To be fair, Howard pretty explicitly said he didn’t want to be the GM.

“I’m not a GM, I never said I wanted to be a GM,” Howard said.

“What I said was I want to be involved. Everybody has a right to be involved. … I should want to be involved. I should want to say ‘hey, this is what we need, this is what we need to do.’ If I didn’t care, I wouldn’t have said anything. Obviously I care enough about this team that I’ve asked them and I want to be involved. If you don’t like something, you’d just walk away. If you want to be involved you’d do anything you can. If you don’t get it, what do you do?”

via Dwight Howard of Orlando Magic cites poor relationship with GM as reason for trade demand – ESPN.

One slight problem.

Dwight Howard’s input is pretty well worthless.

It’s not really his fault. It’s hard to really be up on analyzing player trends, thinking of the total team concept, working on scouting and statistical analysis when you’re dunking the bejesus out of people. And yet multiple reports have indicated Howard was upset with the amnesty clause being used on Gilbert Arenas. Reports indicated Howard was upset at the trade of Rashard Lewis. In short, this comes across as Howard wanting to bring his friends in, and being upset when management wanted to manage, and wanted their player to play.

It’s one thing for stars to be consulted on deals, to be made aware of decisions. But there’s a big gap between that and having influence. Howard has his own agenda, he’s always had his own agenda, and it involves commercial appeal. And that’s great! He’s a genuinely funny, lovable guy. But don’t lie to the fans, don’t lie to the media, and don’t lie to yourself. Melo played it cold, because that’s what the situation required. Howard trying to play the victim is like someone being upset they got a paper cut while causing a car wreck.

If you’re going to blow the tracks, don’t blame the conductor.

Knicks making effort to acquire Jamal Crawford in sign-and-trade

Orlando Magic v Atlanta Hawks - Game Six

Donnie Walsh said in the press conference announcing his departure from the Knicks’ president job that the team’s objective was to build supporting players around Amar’e Stoudemire and Carmelo Anthony. He acknowledged the difficulty of that given the salary constraints of having two stars, but also made it clear that it wasn’t about a third star, but about support for those two. And yet, talks continued regarding the possible acquisition of Chris Paul or Dwight Howard. But when the Knicks landed Tyson Chandler in a sign-and-trade, it became apparent that they have a commitment to actually building an entire team.

That approach is continuing on Sunday, as the Knicks are pursuing a three-team sign-and-trade to acquire Jamal Crawford from the Hawks, according to the New York Post.  Toney Douglas is one piece leaving for New York in the talks.

So is Crawford a seamless fit? Absolutely not. The Knicks need a pure-point creator, a low-usage guy who can run the offense, not turn it over, and create shots for other players. Crawford is very much none of those things. He’s a high-usage scorer who does not have terrific playmaking abilities. He’s 31-years-old and his defense has never been excellent.

But he played decent enough defense in Atlanta, and he makes a high-octane offense that much better. The sign-and-trade will get Crawford the kind of money he wants, or at least more than he would have made getting the MLE from New York. He can handle the ball and he’s going to be killer on kickout when a double comes versus Melo or STAT.

There’s a lot to question about this move, but New York’s limited in its options, it’s a weak year for point guards, and Crawford’s one of the best left on the market. New York doesn’t have a solid all-around team (their bench will be an absolute nightmare), but they’ve done what they said. They’re building around the two stars.