Tag: flopping

Cleveland Cavaliers v Brooklyn Nets

Reggie Evans becomes the first player fined for flopping under league’s new rules (VIDEO)


UPDATE 5:17 p.m. ET: The Brooklyn Nets Reggie Evans has in fact been fined $5000 for this incident, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports. Nobody is shocked. He deserved it.

4:44 p.m. ET: Given the fact that Reggie Evans was prominently featured in the video the league showed to teams and media before the season started to demonstrate what would and would not be tolerated under the league’s new rules against flopping, the fact that he’s now likely to be the first player fined for it really shouldn’t come as much of a surprise.

Evans received one of the first four warnings for flopping that’s been given out this season, and if after receiving a warning a player is determined to have flopped once again, they would receive a fine of $5,000.

The video clip above clearly features Evans “falling all over the place,” as Kobe Bryant might say.

It’s definitely a flop, but the thing about the league’s warnings so far is the fact they’ve been pretty subjective. The ones issued have unquestionably been for blatant violations, and this is certainly another one.

But there have been plenty of flops that have gone unpunished so far this season, so we’ll just have to see if this latest effort from Evans isn’t deemed severe enough, and ends up slipping through the cracks.

[via EOB]

Report: NBA nearing new policy on flopping penalties

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Last season, concerns about flopping rocketed up the list of NBA issues. It’s not like flopping was anything new to the NBA, but it was in the spotlight and gathering attention. Basketball was drawing soccer comparisons.

And if there is one thing David Stern can’t tolerate, it’s the image of the NBA being sullied (lockouts aside).

So the NBA is going to have a new policy on it, tweeted both the New York Times Howard Beck and the Associated Press’ Brian Mahoney. This sums it up well.


I think this is a good step. While referees can still call flopping to ask them to determine motive and action at the time of the foul is both often very difficult and would slow the game down. Better for guys to get a fine later and have that be the deterrent.

But you can bet there are going to be some borderline calls this year that will lead to controversy. Just wait.

NBA considers penalizing floppers day after incident

San Antonio Spurs v Phoenix Suns

David Stern does not like where all this flopping is going. You can like to believe that its because Stern cares about the integrity of the game, I tend to believe he doesn’t like the PR hit the league has been taking on the issue, but either way he wants to crack down.

That may include watching video and handing out fines for flopping the day after, Stern said Monday after his newly formed competition committee met for six hours.

That kind of review is what the league already does for flagrant fouls and technicals, they get upgraded and downgraded all the time. This would be an extension of that, the league calling out obvious flops with a fine, Stern said. He even joked about the call players would get.

“Greetings from the league office. You have been assigned flopper status. No, I’m joking, but something like that,” Stern said. “That sort of lets people know that it’s not enough to say `it’s all part of the game.”‘

I think this can help with some of the most egregious flops. However, there are a lot of players who exaggerate existing contact and will be harder to determine and fine guys for. Basically, this is not going away totally. But maybe it can stop the plays where it looks like guys were shot by a sniper in the arena.

Any rule changes would need to be approved by this committee and then by the Board of Governors (the owners).

Stern is going on a “stop flopping” crusade, will look at rules

Miami Heat v Oklahoma City Thunder - Game One

Flopping in the NBA is not a new issue — Vlade Divac mastered it long ago — but it has become a bigger topic of discussion in the last year. Talk about flopping is seemingly everywhere and suddenly there are people wondering if there is more flopping in the NBA or international soccer.

David Stern does not like that talk. Not one bit. You know how he gets about the NBA’s image. Flopping came up at his annual meeting with the media before Game 1 of the NBA finals and he was clearly frustrated.

“‘Flopping’ almost doesn’t do it justice,” Stern said. “Trickery. Deceit. Designed to cause the game to be decided other than on its merits. We’ll be looking at that.”

By “we” he means his streamlined (read: easier to control and manipulate) competition committee, which is going to start meeting next week. That committee has a couple owners, a couple GMs, players and owners (it used to be the 30 NBA GMs that decided rule changes). Stern said he has seen the agenda for the competition committee and flopping is on it.

Looking at it is one thing, the bigger challenge is how do you address it — if you’re talking about a charge/block situation that is a tough call anyway.

“Instant replay and elimination of tricks that are designed either to fool the ref or, if you don’t fool the ref, to make the fans think that the refs made a bad call by not calling it,” Stern said. “That shouldn’t have a place in our game….

“We don’t like to get into a situation where we tell the officials, ‘This is the rule but don’t call so many.’ If there’s a rule to be changed, then we’ll look at it, and I think there will be a robust discussion about an interpretation or an emphasis about how that should or shouldn’t be called.”

Flopping can already be called as a foul and you can train the referees to look for it more. But the problem remains that it is an interpretation call and guys are looking for an edge. There are going to be struggles enforcing this because flops will still get foul calls and some fouls will get called flops. It is not going to be clean.

But they are going to try to do something. David Stern is tired of the talk.

Shane Battier would welcome anti-flop regulations, but wants offensive floppers penalized as well

LeBron James, Kane Fitzgerald

A lot of NBA fans hate “flopping,” or the practice of a defensive player falling back like he was knocked clean out after an offensive player so much as touches him, with a passion. There has even been talk of passing some rules that would penalize a “flop.” Shane Battier, who is among the league leaders in charges taken, has some thoughts on anti-flop penalties, and they’re not exactly what you think they might be. Hoopidea’s Tom Haberstroh has the story:

You might be surprised to find out Battier’s stance on anti-flop regulation:

He’s all for it.

But there’s one key stipulation: offensive floppers would need to be called, too.

Battier joked that offensive flopping is “the silent killer” of the league. Sure, charge-takers might exaggerate the impact of a collision, but offensive players aren’t exactly innocent either. In Battier’s mind, an anti-flopping measure would need to be implemented on both ends of the floor.

“As long as they have the same penalty against offensive floppers – guys who drive through the lane and throw back their head and flail and cry – then I’d have no problem with it on the defensive end,” Battier said.

Battier singled out long-haired former teammate Luis Scola for using his hair to draw whistles, and he does have a point about “offensive flopping” — it’s become completely ordinary to see players fly back when they get bumped dribbling on the perimeter, jerk their head back in the way Battier described when going to the rim, and shout “and-1!” every time they put up a layup attempt in traffic.

The league has already tried to crack down some on “cheap points” by officially eliminating the “rip move” this off-season, but Battier would apparently be in favor of doing something like fining offensive floppers or making an “offensive flop” a turnover, which would deny the chance for an offensive rebound. Flopping is and always will be extremely hard to regulate, but it’s always fun to see a smart guy like Battier discuss some potential rule changes.

(By the way, my two cents on flopping: if referees were willing to call offensive fouls when a defender has good position, gets run into, and stays on his feet while trying to contest the shot, we might see less guys sliding across the floor when an offensive player’s move to the basket generates a slight breeze. Just a thought.)