Tag: Dwight Howard

Chicago Bulls v Atlanta Hawks

Joakim Noah, Paul George lead NBA All-Defensive Teams


Chicago’s Joakim Noah and Indiana’s Paul George — representing the NBA’s clear best defenses in the NBA — deserved to be on top of the NBA All-Defensive teams standing.

Those two were the leading vote getters as the NBA announced its All-Defensive team lists, which were released by the NBA on Monday. Among the interesting things is LeBron James — who did step back on defense this sea on — fell to the second team. Also Roy Hibbert — who was a defensive phenom in the first half of the season and in the second half his defense never slipped like his offense — edged out DeAndre Jordan for the second team.

Also of note, somebody gave James Harden a vote (he had two points, either one first team vote or two second team votes) and David Lee got a vote as well. Let’s just say Timothy Leary at the peak of his experience (so to speak) would think James Harden belonged on the All-Defensive team.

These were voted on by 123 media members.

NBA All-Defensive First team (one center, two forwards, two guards)

Joakim Noah (Chicago, center) 223
Paul George (Indiana, forward) 161
Chris Paul (LA Clippers, guard) 156
Serge Ibaka (Oklahoma City, forward) 152
Andre Iguodala (Golden State, guard/forward) 148

NBA All-Defensive Second team (one center, two forwards, two guards)

LeBron James (Miami, forward) 134
Patrick Beverley (Houston, guard) 112
Jimmy Butler (Chicago, guard) 103
Kawhi Leonard (San Antonio, forward) 89
Roy Hibbert (Indiana, center) 76

Other players receiving votes, with point totals (First Team votes in parentheses): DeAndre Jordan, L.A. Clippers 63 (14); Anthony Davis, New Orleans, 62 (18); Tony Allen, Memphis, 60 (17); Tim Duncan, San Antonio, 45 (12); Dwight Howard, Houston, 26 (6); Taj Gibson, Chicago, 21 (2); Mike Conley, Memphis, 21 (5); Ricky Rubio, Minnesota, 19 (5); Lance Stephenson, Indiana, 14 (3); P.J. Tucker, Phoenix, 13 (2); Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City, 10 (2); Kyle Lowry, Toronto, 10 (3); Eric Bledsoe, Phoenix, 9 (1); Marc Gasol, Memphis, 8; John Wall, Washington, 8 (1); Thabo Sefolosha, Oklahoma City, 8 (1); Kirk Hinrich, Chicago, 7 (2); Trevor Ariza, Washington, 5 (2); Avery Bradley, Boston, 5 (1); Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City, 5 (1); Klay Thompson, Golden State, 5; Andrew Bogut, Golden State, 4; Chris Bosh, Miami, 4 (1); Luol Deng, Cleveland, 4 (1); Wesley Matthews, Portland, 4 (1); Tony Parker, San Antonio, 4 (1); Nicolas Batum, Portland, 3 (1); Stephen Curry, Golden State, 3 (1); Danny Green, San Antonio, 3 (1); Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Charlotte, 3; Shaun Livingston, Brooklyn, 3 (1); Victor Oladipo, Orlando, 3 (1); DeMarre Carroll, Atlanta, 2; Matt Barnes, L.A. Clippers, 2 (1); James Harden, Houston, 2; George Hill, Indiana, 2; Jeff Teague, Atlanta, 2; Dwyane Wade, Miami, 2 (1); Kemba Walker, Charlotte, 2; David West, Indiana, 2; Arron Afflalo, Orlando, 1; Corey Brewer, Minnesota, 1; Michael Carter-Williams, Philadelphia,1; Darren Collison, L.A. Clippers, 1; DeMar DeRozan, Toronto, 1; Andre Drummond, Detroit, 1; Monta Ellis, Dallas, 1; Danny Granger, L.A. Clippers, 1; Draymond Green, Golden State, 1; Reggie Jackson, Oklahoma City, 1; David Lee, Golden State, 1; Paul Millsap, Atlanta, 1; Rajon Rondo, Boston, 1.

Phil Jackson says he will not coach Knicks, Steve Kerr verbally committed before Warriors job came open

New York Knicks Press Conference

Phil Jackson is trying to change the culture of the New York Knicks. Which seems a lot like the job Sisyphus had, but Jackson is trying. This has been easily the most secrative, paranoid organization in the NBA, one that guarded the mundane as if it were classified troop locations in Afganistan.

Jackson’s arrival brought hope to New York fans, but his arrival has not seen the hiring of a sexy new coach — or any coach — and Carmelo Anthony hasn’t been swayed from testing the free agent market. Neither of which is really a big deal, but when you’ve been expected to walk across the Hudson and turn water into wine — or convert the Knicks roster into a contender — any setback real or imagined becomes a story.

Jackson broke with tradition and spoke to the media again on Thursday, as reported by Ian Begley at ESPNNewYork.com.

Those topics started with this: No, he’s not going to coach the Knicks. For the millionth time no.

On the prospect of Jackson himself taking over the team, the 13-time world champion said, “at this point, unless the Lord heals me” he wouldn’t be physically able to coach.

He said that the idea he could coach for one season as a “transition period” and hand over the reins to another coach next year has been discussed. But Jackson said that’s not an idea that he’s comfortable with.

What Jackson reiterated is he wants a coach he has worked with before. And yes, that means he is waiting on Derek Fisher (who is a tad busy still as the backup point guard of the Oklahoma City Thunder).

(Jackson) also addressed the Knicks’ ongoing coaching search, saying that he has interviewed several candidates. He referred to Thunder guard Derek Fisher as “a person that’s on my list of guys that could be very good candidates for this job.”

As for the one that got away — Steve Kerr — Jackson said he thought he had a deal in place but that all turned when Mark Jackson was fired in Golden State.

“Unfortunately for him, he committed to me the day before the job opened with Golden State. So I had to kind of release him to actually go to this job and say you have to do what’s right for yourself,” Jackson said. “I understood entirely the process he was going through to have that job open up. That was something he kind of thought would be a good fit for him. So that’s good, we’re happy for him.”

There were also questions about the Knicks other big issue this summer — Carmelo Anthony becoming a free agent. Anthony almost certainly will test the free agent waters this summer (he reportedly said he wants the “full Dwight Howard treatment” in terms of being recruited” but Jackson is trying to talk him out of that.

Jackson said Friday that he has talked to Anthony about the possibility of opting in to the final year of his deal and testing free agency in the summer of 2015, to which Anthony said he’d “think about it.”

Jackson said he “not losing sleep” over the idea Anthony could bolt this summer — the Bulls and Rockets are among a number of teams expected to make a run — but he is concerned Anthony could leave. If so, he says they will rebuild without him.

No Anthony would mean a very rough next season in New York, but clearing the decks of salary by the summer of 2015 could be a cleaner path to a total restructuring of this roster. Which is needed.

Carmelo Anthony meets with advisors to talk free agency, Knicks likely still in lead

Golden State Warriors v New York Knicks

Conventional wisdom around the league remains that Carmelo Anthony likely will re-sign in New York, but not until he’s had a chance to be wooed by other teams. And the recruiting pitches could change things.

Anthony is playing things close to the vest (outside a two-hour sit-down with Phil Jackson) so nobody really knows what he’s thinking, but he had a sit down with his advisors late last week, reports the New York Post.

Anthony, his Creative Artists Agency agent Leon Rose, and CAA advisor William Wesley were in the group of six at a well-known haunt on 28th Street called Pergola in a strategy session discussing their options. The source said the group sat in a private back room.

A number of teams will show interest. The biggest names in that mix are Chicago, Houston and the long shot Los Angeles Lakers (they will go through the motions but wisely don’t see Anthony and Kobe Bryant as meshing or building for the long term). There will be others, but the Post lays out the case for the Knicks.

Two of his prime candidates, Houston and Chicago, still have to get far enough under the salary cap to make it worth it for Anthony. The Bulls may have to rid themselves of Mike Dunleavy, Carlos Boozer and Taj Gibson on a squad that was knocked out of the playoffs in the first round. Plus, Anthony would be banking on the uncertain future of the oft-injured Derrick Rose. The Rockets were also knocked out in the first round and need to get rid of Jeremy Lin and Omer Asik to get under the salary cap.

With all of these teams — the Knicks included — Anthony is going to be asked to take less money than his max.

As we have said before, what Anthony needs to decide is what really matters most to him. Is it money? Is it being “the man” on a team built around him? Is it winning? Is it being in New York? And along those lines Anthony needs to decide who he really trusts — does he trust Phil Jackson to be able to build a winner quickly in New York? Does he trust Rose’s knees and Tom Thibodeau’s system in Chicago? Does he want to play next to Dwight Howard?

I’m not sure Anthony can answer those questions yet. Oh, he’ll say “winning” but that’s the easy generalization, everyone wants to win. What is he willing to sacrifice, both financially and on the court, to get into the best position to do that? For example, if he likes Chicago as a fit is he willing to take enough of a salary reduction that they can keep Taj Gibson? Is he willing to let the offense run through Derrick Rose?

With Kevin Love out there on the trade market as another high scoring four, it’s going to be interesting to see who teams target, and what resources they throw at the efforts. But Anthony will have options, he just has to decide what he really wants.

Reports: Kings want to trade for Kevin Love, whether he agrees to stay or not. Wizards may be interested, too.

Kevin Love

Minnesota will trade Kevin Love to whichever team gives them the best package in return.

Love has some leverage in this process because teams will not jump in the game unless he agrees to re-sign (or at least opt in for a year) with them, teams don’t want to give up assets for a rental. Nobody wants to the Lakers with Dwight Howard.

Well… not nobody.

The Sacramento Kings under the aggressive ownership of Vivek Ranadive want to get in the Love trade mix whether or not he plans to re-sign there, reports Marc Spears at Yahoo.

The Sacramento Kings have let the Minnesota Timberwolves know they are interested in trading for All-Star forward Kevin Love – and the Kings would make a deal without any assurance from Love he’d re-sign with them, a league source told Yahoo Sports…

The Kings are willing to give up their eighth overall pick in this year’s NBA draft and a combination of players for Love, even though he would not be expected to sign a contract extension before next season – if ever, with the rebuilding, small-market franchise, the source said. Sacramento envisions Love and DeMarcus Cousins playing alongside each other in the front court. Swingman Rudy Gay has a player’s option for next season.

This is the kind of thing teams leak to show their fan bases “we will do whatever it takes for you” knowing full well the entire time it’s not happening.

As Romeo Void taught us (before Beiber was even born), never say never. However the odds of Love re-signing with Sacramento would be minuscule. What teams around the league hear is that Love wants to be in a major market and to start winning now. Sacramento is not going to fit that bill (although the Love/Cousins/Gay combo likely lifts the Kings to the playoffs).

Washington doesn’t fit the bill either, but the Wizards may be interested, too, reports David Aldridge of NBA.com.

Wiz are a stealth candidate for Kevin Love — his father, Stan, who played for the then-Bullets in the early ’70s, gave his son the middle name “Wesley,” as in Wes Unseld. And Kevin Love has a soft spot as a result for the franchise. But the trade talk will surely die when the words “Bradley Beal” come out of Flip Saunders’ mouth.

Neither Sacramento nor Washington are markets that Kevin Love likely has on his “I would re-sign there” list.

That list is thought to include the Lakers, Bulls, Warriors, Knicks, and Rockets.

Minnesota doesn’t care, they want the best package available. I’m not sure the No. 8 pick, Ben McLemore and some other pieces to make the salaries match is going to be the best offer. Same with any Wizards package without Beal or John Wall.

But don’t be surprised if other teams consider jumping in or at least saying they are, pushed by aggressive owners. It’s good PR to say you tried. Love is a big-time player and the Timberwolves are going to some interesting offers for him.

They will take the best one for them, not him.

Report: Cleveland Cavaliers do not want to offer Kyrie Irving max contact

Kyrie Irving

If the Cavaliers want to see how not offering the full max contract extension to Kyrie Irving would end, they should watch the Kevin Love saga unfold this summer (Minny’s GM at the time refused to offer Love a fifth year, one of the many problems in that relationship). Minnesota is going to lose its cornerstone player, and they pretty much have to trade him for less than equal value to get anything back in return.

Irving has some maturing to do as a team leader but the 22-year-old averaging 20.8 points and 6.1 assists a game, the All-Star Game MVP, is a clear max player, and he is eligible for that extension this summer.

And the Cavaliers may not want to give it to him, reports Mitch Lawrence of the New York Daily News.

The Cavs are making noises that they aren’t going to offer Kyrie Irving “max money’’ this summer via a long-term extension. They don’t want to deal the 2014 All-Star Game MVP, but it could come to that, especially if the West Orange product and his family continue to tell people that he wants out. Irving hasn’t been a leader in his first three seasons and he’s also gained the unwelcomed reputation as a locker-room problem. Those are two reasons the Cavs don’t see him as a max player.

“He was just handed too much, too soon,’’ said one source. “You’ve got to make these young guys earn it, and that’s where this team did a bad job with him.’’

Irving may need to mature, the Cavaliers may need to bring in some authority-commanding veterans to lead that locker room, but you have a 22-year-old All-Star point guard, one who is a gifted scorer and floor general, and you can pair him the No. 1 pick in a good (not transcendent, but good) draft. Be smart with the pick and you have cornerstones for building a future contender.

Unless you blow it.

There has been some buzz that Irving wouldn’t sign a max extension, but he basically shot that idea down. Everyone signs the max extension after their rookie contract (everyone — LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard and everyone else who forced their way out)… unless you don’t offer it.

This report flips that story on its head.

I wonder if the Cavaliers look at whoever they draft No. 1 and decide not to offer Irving the full five years of the max (you can only have one of those active at a time in the new CBA) and think they are going to offer him four years instead.

Which is what the Timberwolves did to Love. He signed it. But how did that work out?