Tag: Dwight Howard

Jeremy Lin, Omer Asik

Report: Rockets confident they can trade Jeremy Lin and Omer Asik


From the moment the Rockets signed Dwight Howard until the trade deadline, the Omer Asik trade saga went on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and… You get the idea.

But through all the rumors and reports and discussions, Houston never found an acceptable deal.

Though Jeremy Lin didn’t come up in trade talks as often, there were at least a couple inquiries. No deal for him either.

If the Rockets have their eyes on LeBron James, Chris Bosh, Carmelo Anthony, Dirk Nowitzki, Kevin Love or any other star who might – but probably won’t – be available this offseason, trading Asik and/or Lin is the simplest way to facilitate it.

Can Houston trade those two?

Jonathan Feigen of Ultimate Rockets:

According to an individual familiar with the Rockets’ plans, they are confident they would be able to move Lin and Asik’s contracts because unlike their failed efforts to trade Asik last season, they would be looking to clear cap room, rather than bring back rotation players with similar contracts .

Not asking for assets in return for Asik and Lin will help – there was a lot of grumbling about Houston’s asking price for Asik – but that might not be enough. Asik and Lin will each get paid $14,898,938 next season – a tough pill for a team to swallow if trading for them, even though their cap numbers ($8,374,646 each) are fairly reasonable.

Making the task tougher, Houston might have to narrow their pool of trade partners specifically to the team on the other end of a sign-and-trade. If they were focused on maximizing cap space this summer by trading Asik and Lin to any team that will take them, the Rockets wouldn’t decline Chandler Parsons’ team option. By doing that, they’re raising Parsons’ cap number from $964,750 to $2,875,130 when free agency begins – and it will only go up from there once Parsons signs.

Simply, Houston is not close to gaining enough cap space to sign one of its coveted stars. By declining Parsons’ option, the Rockets are moving even further from that goal.

Even if they trade Asik and Lin and take back no additional salary, they’d be projected to have just $14,321,273 in cap room. By comparison, here are the maximum starting salaries for their top target if each becomes a free agent this offseason:

  • LeBron: $20,659,633
  • Bosh: $20,659,633
  • Melo: $22,458,402
  • Nowitzki: $23,857,450

Unless the Rockets are aiming lower in the free-agent pool or have more up their sleeves – both of which are certainly possible – they’re not really gaining ground by trading Asik and Lin.

Unless it’s a sign-and-trade with Lin and Asik going out, which would allow the Rockets to take back a player with a higher salary than they could get with the aforementioned cap-room route. But the other team would have to accept paying Asik and nearly $15 million each next year. And we’re back to square one, where trading them in a worthwhile deal won’t be easy.

Kevin Durant a unanimous All-NBA first-team selection, LeBron James not

LeBron James, Kevin Durant

Kevin Durant, after his MVP season, was an All-NBA first-team lock. So was LeBron James.

But Durant makes his fifth straight All-NBA first team via unanimous vote this time. LeBron’s seventh straight first-team appearance comes with a blemish – a single voter who put him on the second team, believing the Heat star is not one of the two best forwards in the NBA.

Among players whose exact vote totals are less consequential than inclusion, Chris Paul, James Harden and Joakim Noah made the first team.

Throughout the three teams, there are no huge surprises. Paul George made himself a lot of money. Stephen Curry narrowly fell behind Harden for first team. Noah, Curry, Damian Lillard, Goran Dragic and Al Jefferson all made an All-NBA team for the first time in their careers.

Here are the full teams (first-team votes, total points):

First team

  • Guard: Chris Paul, L.A. Clippers (86, 540)
  • Guard:  James Harden, Houston (73, 502)
  • Forward: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City (125, 625)
  • Forward: LeBron James, Miami (124, 623)
  • Center: Joakim Noah, Chicago (101, 551)

Second team

    • Guard: Stephen Curry, Golden State (65, 489)
    • Guard: Tony Parker, San Antonio (14, 210)
    • Forward: Blake Griffin, L.A. Clippers (5, 350)
    • Forward: Kevin Love, Minnesota (2, 237)
    • Center: Dwight Howard, Houston (9, 226)

Third team

  • Guard: Damian Lillard, Portland (2, 115)
  • Guard: Goran Dragic, Phoenix (1, 115)
  • Forward: Paul George, Indiana (4, 171)
  • Forward: LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland (2, 159)
  • Center: Al Jefferson, Charlotte (4, 191)

Other players receiving votes, point totals (first-team votes): Carmelo Anthony, New York, 86 (1) John Wall, Washington, 70; Tim Duncan, San Antonio, 63 (1); DeMar DeRozan, Toronto, 56; Anthony Davis, New Orleans, 40 (1); Dirk Nowitzki, Dallas, 37 (1); Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City, 32 (1); Kyle Lowry, Toronto, 29; DeAndre Jordan, L.A. Clippers, 21; Roy Hibbert, Indiana, 17; Marc Gasol, Memphis, 16 (2); DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento, 14 (1); Kyrie Irving, Cleveland, 7; Dwyane Wade, Miami, 6; Mike Conley, Memphis, 4; Serge Ibaka, Oklahoma City, 4; Zach Randolph, Memphis, 4; Joe Johnson, Brooklyn, 4; Lance Stephenson, Indiana, 3; Ty Lawson, Denver, 2; Paul Millsap, Atlanta, 2; Chris Bosh, Miami, 1; Andre Drummond, Detroit, 1; Monta Ellis, Dallas, 1; Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio, 1

Report: Rockets to decline team option on Chandler Parsons in pursuit of bigger star

Miami Heat v Houston Rockets

If they desire, the Rockets will keep Chandler Parsons next season. That was always the case.

It will just cost them a little more now – by their choice.

The Rockets hold a $964,750 team option on Parsons for next season. If they exercise it, he’ll become an unrestricted free agent in 2015. If they decline it, he’ll become a restricted free agent this summer – i.e., getting a raise sooner but one Houston can match.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

The Houston Rockets plan to decline the fourth-year option on forward Chandler Parsons’ contract, freeing him to become a restricted free agent this summer, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Houston is determined to clear the necessary salary cap space this summer to chase a third maximum contract free agent to join Dwight Howard and James Harden, league sources tell Yahoo Sports.

Houston plans to pursue the major stars who could be available upon opting out of deals, including Miami’s LeBron James and Chris Bosh, and New York’s Carmelo Anthony, league sources said. Dallas’ Dirk Nowitzki is expected to be a target too.

We already knew the Rockets were interested in Kevin Love, an attainable target. But why not also put LeBron, Bosh, Melo and Nowitzki on the radar? Who wouldn’t want one of those players?

However, if the Rockets were intent on maximizing cap room, they would have just picked up Parsons’ option to ensure he’d count against the cap at $964,750.

[MORE: PBT Podcast — Finals preview, Heat vs. Spurs]

By Houston declining it and then extending a qualifying offer, Parsons will count against the cap at $2,875,130* until he signs either a contract or offer sheet. Then, he’ll count against the cap at his 2014-15 salary, which will surely be much higher.

*He earned a higher qualifying offer by meeting the starter criteria. That puts his qualifying offer equal to the rookie-scale amount for the No. 21 pick in the 2010 draft (not 2011, as previously noted). Though Parsons was drafted in 2011, the 2010 draft is used because players drafted in the first round in 2010 are finishing their contracts this season.

So, it seems the Rockets are more interested in a sign-and-trade.

I’d think a player of Parsons’ quality making less than $1 million, even if on an expiring contract and due a big raise the following year, would have high trade value. But to add salary in a trade – LeBron, Bosh, Melo, Nowitzki or Love wouldn’t come cheap – the Rockets would have to send out a comparable amount of salary. In that sense, a higher-paid Parsons could be more helpful.

This decision might say something about the low trade value of Omer Asik and Jeremy Lin, who will each count $8,374,646 against the cap next season while owed $14,898,938 in real money. Though that cap number could facilitate a sign-and-trade, teams might balk about actually paying so much in actual dollars.

Hence, Parsons – a better player than Asik and Lin – could become the preferred sign-and-trade option.

Of course, Parsons would have to go along with a sign-and-trade. He’s clearly fond of Houston, and he might not accommodate a deal that sends him elsewhere.

[MORE: The curious case of Chandler Parsons]

That said, he should welcome making around $10 million rather than less than $1 million next season. Wherever Parsons plays in 2014-15, Houston is doing him a huge favor.

Personally, I would have exercised Parsons’ option and enjoyed the advantages of a good starter making so little money for an extra year. Then, once the contracts of Asik and Lin expire next summer, I would have tried to leverage Parsons’ tiny free agent amount into huge cap space and then gone over the cap to re-sign Parsons.

But Morey should know the Rockets’ current options better than I do. This could be the first step to something very big.

And if that backfires, Houston will at least safely lock up Parsons for several more years, though at a higher cost.

Pau Gasol swings by Sesame Street (VIDEO)

Miami Heat v Los Angeles Lakers

Sources say free agent Paul Gasol is being recruited by Elmo to join the Sesame Street team next season. Insert your own joke here about how Sesame Street is less of a circus than Mike D’Antoni’s Lakers last year.

The NBA has a running tradition with the educational children’s show, going back to Dr. J and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar up through Carmelo Anthony, Blake Griffin and now Pau Gasol. Dwight Howard seemed to fit in especially well, but I guess that shouldn’t be a surprise.

Chicago Bulls avoid the luxury tax

Taj Gibson, Joakim Noah

The Chicago Bulls ended the regular season $791,165 below the luxury-tax line.

That’s according to my calculations using salary data from ShamSports.com.

However, that didn’t mean the Bulls would avoid the luxury tax. A few incentives hung in the balance:

That’s up to $1.25 million in performance bonuses – enough to push Chicago over the limit. But the Bulls – unless there are any unreported unlikely incentives their players have met – can now rest easy.

Noah could still make the All-NBA first team – the NBA hasn’t announced that yet – but he won’t win a championship. And Gibson won’t make an All-Defensive team.

Gibson finished 16th in All-Defensive team voting, and though he could have theoretically earned a spot at either center or forward, four bigs – DeAndre Jordan, Anthony Davis, Tim Duncan and Dwight Howard – finished ahead of him in the also-receiving-votes section. Gibson wasn’t really that close to landing a spot on the position-specific teams.

So, the most the Bulls will pay in incentives – again, assuming there aren’t any unreported ones – is $500,000, leaving them safely under the tax line.

The upside for Chicago could be immense.

For one, the Bulls will get any luxury-tax payments distributed to non-tax teams. Jerry Reinsdorf must appreciate that.

Chicago will also avoid a year counting toward the stiff repeater penalties for tax-paying teams. Now, if the Bulls want to dip into the tax in a future season, they’ll have more flexibility to do so.

And this summer, Noah’s and Gibson’s contracts won’t count more against the cap. If those players had the same incentive clauses listed for the 2014-15 season – which is probably the case – the amount of the performance bonuses would count against the cap until the players failed to achieve the benchmark. Since that wouldn’t be determined until this time next season, Chicago would have gone the whole offseason with a little less cap room. When you might be pursuing Carmelo Anthony and/or Kevin Love, those little details matter.

It’s possible the Bulls lose flexibility this offseason with Noah’s $500,000 All-NBA first team bonus, but considering they’re at least in the clear of the luxury tax, they shouldn’t mind too much.