Tag: Dwight Howard


Chandler Parsons on DeAndre Jordan: “He wasn’t ready for being a franchise player. He was scared.”


Chandler Parsons is the John Calipari, the secret weapon recruiter for NBA teams. His efforts were part of the reason Dwight Howard chose Houston a few years back.

Now a Maverick, Parsons was heavily involved in recruiting DeAndre Jordan to the Mavericks. And it worked… at first. After verbally committing to the Mavericks Jordan changed his mind and in the final 24 hours decided he wanted to stay with the Clippers and re-signed with them. Without so much as a phone call to Dallas.

Chandler Parsons was bent about how all this went down.

He went off on Jordan, speaking to Tim MacMahon of ESPN.

“He wasn’t ready for being a franchise player. He was scared,” Parsons said. “He was scared to take the next step in his career. There was no other reason other than that he was comfortable and he has friendships there. How you make a business decision like that is beyond me. How you ignore an owner like Mark who is in your hometown just waiting for a chance to talk to you is beyond me.

“I don’t think he made a mistake. I think he’ll be good in L.A. He’s got a good team, he’s got a great point guard, he’s got Blake, but I think he could have been a superstar in Dallas. He could have been the man in Dallas. Never in a million years did I think that this was even a possibility.

“I’ll still be friends with him, but I can’t get over the way that he’s put our entire franchise in jeopardy. It’s normal to get cold feet. It’s normal to get second thoughts, but you don’t back out of a commitment of this much magnitude this late in the game and just leave us high and dry.”


First off, I want Mavericks at the Clippers on opening night, then the Clippers at the Mavericks on Christmas. Make this happen, NBA schedule makers.

Part of the frustration for Parsons, Mark Cuban and the rest of the Mavericks — and a concern about other teams around the league — is that there was a cascade of other moves by teams based on Jordan going to the Mavs. It started with Dallas signing Wesley Matthews — Cuban said he offered to let Matthews out of the deal, but Matthews wanted to stay with Dallas. Beyond that a lot of moves and trades — Roy Hibbert, Kosta Koufos and others — might have been different if Jordan had said from the start he would be a Clipper. Cuban said the Mavs may have decided to tank the season if that had been the case.

In the end, Jordan landed where he wanted to be, and he didn’t violate any rules.

But he’s made more than a few enemies.

Report: DeAndre Jordan agrees to four-year, $80 million deal to join Dallas Mavericks

San Antonio Spurs v Los Angeles Clippers - Game Five

DeAndre Jordan is choosing his native Texas — and a more featured role in the offense — over staying with the Los Angeles Clippers.

He has chosen to play for thee Dallas Mavericks, something first reported by Marc Stein of ESPN.

Soon a number of others confirmed the deal, including Marc Spears of Yahoo confirmed this news. Some reports said both the Mavericks and Clippers were informed of the decision.

This, along with the signing of Wesley Matthews, will constitute another huge off-season for the Mavericks and make them one of the top teams in the West.

Chandler Parsons, who helped recruit Dwight Howard to Houston when Parsons was a Rocket, has been glued to the hip of Jordan for days trying to sway him toward Dallas. That guy should be a college coach someday the way he recruits.

This is a massive blow to the Clippers, a team that up until a few days was confident that Jordan would return. Doc Rivers built up Jordan’s career — got him to focus on his strengths, put him in better spots on the floor, built up the confidence that Vinny Del Negro had torn down — but Rivers could not convince Jordan to stay. Chris Paul tried to contact him and smooth over their relationship, but that also ended up not being enough.

Los Angeles does not have much cap space left to replace Jordan, just mid-level exception money of around $5.5 million (once Jordan signs). That got them Spencer Hawes a year ago, and we all saw how that worked out. The Clippers may try to get Dallas to do a sign and trade to create a trade exception, and they may try to trade for another center (such as Nene, who would fit in that slot), but they are not gong to land anyone of near the same quality.

Jordan was named first-team NBA All-Defensive Team this past season, he led the NBA in rebounding at 15 a game and he averaged 11.5 points a game on a league-best 71 percent shooting.

Jordan doesn’t feel he gets enough recognition for these kinds of accomplishments — for example, he’s never made the All-Star Team — in part because he has played behind Chris Paul and Blake Griffin (plus he and the ultra-competitive CP3 have had rough patches). In Dallas, Jordan would be the No. 2 option (at least that’s what they told him), and he would get the recognition he seeks from their marketing efforts, plus he’d be going home to Texas.

Jordan is leaving almost $30 million on the table (the Clippers offered five years, $109 million, a max offer), leaving Los Angeles (where he likes living) and leaving a sure fire contender with the Clippers.

But what he really wants is in Texas

Report: Lakers and Knicks didn’t offer Greg Monroe maximum contracts (update: agent says otherwise)


Update: Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:

Howard Beck of Bleacher Report:

Look, I don’t know. David Falk has incentive to say his client had more max offers. The Knicks and Lakers have incentive to say they missed on Monroe due to their own financial decisions rather than on-court ineptitude.

Either way, I think it would have been reasonable for the Knicks and Lakers to offer or not offer Monroe the max. And if they didn’t offer the max, they surely came close.


Are the Lakers and Knicks striking out in free agency?

Or are they just being patient?

Score one for patience with Greg Monroe, who agreed to a three-year max contract with the Bucks.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Monroe plans to join a young core of talent with the Bucks, who made a strong commitment to Monroe after the Los Angeles Lakers and Knicks didn’t offer full maximum contracts, league sources said.

I think Monroe is worth a max contract to the Bucks and most teams with cap space this summer and a need for a center.

But the Lakers and Knicks, who have cap space and need centers, are different.

Part of the appeal of signing Monroe now is not having to compete for free agents with the huge number of teams that will have max cap space next summer. The Lakers and Knicks don’t have to worry as much about that, though. They can secure meetings with most, if not every, major free agent due to their prominent markets.

They can aim higher.

Presumably, they have more info about 2016 free agents than I do. If they think they have a legitimate chance at LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Dwight Howard, Al Horford or some other star, it’s fine to bid less for Monroe.

But here’s what confuses me with the Knicks: There were multiple reports of them being close to signing Monroe. Maybe those reports were just incorrect. If so, ignore this. But if they accurately reflected the Knicks’ perception, that’s troubling. Did they not realize Monroe would get a max offer elsewhere? If so, that’s a bad misread of the market, and that’s a bad sign going forward.

Lakers and Knicks fans should cautiously accept their teams missing on Monroe. But at a certain point, the Lakers and Knicks need to sign someone better to justify it.

Lakers, Knicks struggle on hectic first day of free agency

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There were clear winners on the first day of NBA free agency, where an estimated $1.3 billion in contracts were handed out. The Cleveland Cavaliers are getting the band back together, reaching deals with Kevin Love, Tristan Thompson and Iman Shumpert. The Golden State Warriors kept Draymond Green in house. The Toronto Raptors impressed and signed DeMarre Carroll. The Pelicans re-signed Anthony Davis and Omer Asik. The Phoenix Suns landed Tyson Chandler and re-signed Brandon Knight, then impressed LaMarcus Aldridge. The Spurs also impressed LMA and they re-signed Danny Green at a great price. The Hawks retained Paul Millsap.

As Knicks rookie Jerian Grant said: “Is this free agency or Oprah? You get a max, you get a max, you get a max…”

Yet, the Lakers and Knicks were left standing there, empty handed.

Early in day two of free agency, the Knicks landed Arron Afflalo, a nice pickup but not the game changer their fans have been hoping to see.

These are two of the games biggest brands, in the nation’s two largest markets, both with plenty of cash to spend on free agents, yet both looked woefully behind the times and unable to adjust to the new realities of the NBA.

It is just one day and both will get chances at other big names — the Knicks have long been linked to Greg Monroe, and the Lakers had the opportunity to pitch him as well (update: Monroe chose the Milwaukee Bucks). DeAndre Jordan and others are still on the board.

But both franchises are learning hard lessons.

Free agents now want more than off-the-court opportunities, they want to see a path to winning. Fast. They can live and work out in Los Angeles in the summer if they want the perks of the city, they want to be shown the analytics of how this team can help them win on the court. Now. Social media has altered the world of off-the-court endorsements, being in a big market isn’t as big an advantage as it once was. Today’s free agents want to know how the team can help them grow their brand by landing them on the biggest NBA stages — the playoffs, The Finals, prime-time games on Christmas Day, All-Star Games.

And right now, the Lakers and Knicks are bad basketball teams.

David West was blunt about it talking about the Knicks.

Those struggles on the court permeate the teams’ big pitches to free agents.

The Lakers were one of the co-frontrunners to land LaMarcus Aldridge heading into free agency, and they got the first meeting with the All-Star forward. But their most dynamic speakers are the people on the business side of the equation, Aldridge was left wanting on the basketball side. From a source that spoke to Mike Bresnahan of the Los Angeles Times.

Aldridge considered the Lakers to be part of a “two-horse race” with the San Antonio Spurs and “wanted to be wowed” but was actually turned off by the lack of analytics on the basketball side of their presentation, according to the person….

The Lakers also contended that their analytics outline would have been stronger if they had a better roster last season. The team privately expressed envy that Houston’s presentation could be boasted by stats and on-court analysis of a team with James Harden and, indeed, Dwight Howard.

The Rockets are also far more invested in those analytics. Meanwhile, the Lakers are trying social media campaigns that both seem dated and that the NBA made them take down anyway.

To a degree, this is the impact the other 28 NBA owners wanted with the new Collective Bargaining Agreement — they wanted to take away as much of the inherent advantages of big, profitable franchises as they could. They made the price for continually exceeding the luxury tax so onerous — not just financially, but taking away sign-and-trades and limiting cap exceptions to big-spending teams — that everyone is far more on the same financial playing field.

The Lakers and Knicks have seemed slow to adapt to that new reality. Around the league, they are seen as two teams less willing to embrace the analytics that have driven teams like Golden State, San Antonio and Miami in recent seasons. Both Lakers coach Byron Scott and Knicks head honcho Phil Jackson have at points dismissed the value of the three-point shot. You can try to defend the context of those statements, but the impression was left of two dinosaurs trying to win their same old-school way.

The reality is that rebuilding can be slow and hard. The Lakers can point to an excellent young core of players — D’Angelo Russell, Julius Randle, Jordan Clarkson — and try to paint a picture of how there is hope for the future of the franchise in their hands. It’s a good picture — but players like Aldridge, at age 30, are not going to wait around for that moment. They want to see good basketball teams now. The Lakers and Knicks are just not that.

Free agency is far from over; all is not lost with either of these franchises this summer. As noted before, Monroe is certainly in play, and with the cash to spend the Lakers and Knicks are going to get the attention of other quality players still on the market.

But day one was rough in Los Angeles and New York.

Report: Kobe Bryant was ‘very good’ in Lakers meeting with LaMarcus Aldridge, which went ‘really well’

2015 BET Experience - Genius Talks Presented By AT&T

The Lakers have had prominent free agent meetings in each of the last two summers, only to come away empty-handed when all was said and done.

L.A. chased Carmelo Anthony last year, and reportedly got close. The year prior it was Dwight Howard, though the chances of him re-upping was always extremely slim, for a variety of reasons.

The Lakers were much more optimistic about their chances of landing one or more big names heading into this round of recruiting, and the first meeting with LaMarcus Aldridge reportedly went about as well as could be expected.

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN.com:

The Lakers meeting with LaMarcus Aldridge went almost two hours. Source in the room said it went “really well”

From a person in the room for the Lakers pitch “LaMarcus seemed completely focused.”

Always hard to gauge how a meeting really went, but Lakers felt better about this mtg w/ Aldridge than they did w/ Dwight or Melo.

Bill Oram of the Orange County Register:

Been told Kobe Bryant was “very good” in Lakers meeting with LaMarcus Aldridge. Also that meeting went “well,” for what that’s worth.

This doesn’t mean much in the grand scheme of things; Aldridge knew what the Lakers had to offer before he stepped in the room, and things probably won’t be much different in San Antonio, the other city that has the strongest chance of signing him.

But after the way the last two summers ended in disappointment for the Lakers, they’ll take any encouraging signs they can at this stage of the process.