Tag: Draft Lottery

Mo Williams Clippers

Clippers say no regrets for not protecting lottery pick


The Cleveland Cavaliers will select Kyrie Irving with the top pick in the 2011 NBA Draft — not with their own pick, but the one they got in a trade with the Los Angeles Clippers at the deadline.

That deal was a salary dump by the Clippers — they wanted out of the two years and $28.7 million owed Davis. They didn’t love this draft. So they sent Davis and an unprotected first round pick for Mo Williams (two years, $17 million) and Jamario Moon (off the books this summer).

That pick had only a 2.8 percent chance of being the No. 1 pick. But folks, that is why you top-three protect picks like that.

Clippers GM Neil Olshey spun the “no regrets” line at Scott Howard-Cooper of NBA.com after the draft.

“Protecting the pick was never an option,” L.A. general manager Neil Olshey told NBA.com. “There is no way to Monday morning quarterback this (since) our draft position wouldn’t have been the same had we not made the deal as I’m sure we would not have finished 11-11 post-trade without Mo Williams.

“Additionally, we had a 97-percent chance of sitting here tonight with Baron Davis (taking up 25 percent of our cap), the eighth pick in a weak draft and no cap flexibility. Adding Mo Williams and $8.5 million in cap room gave us a better opportunity to become a playoff team next year than adding a seventh player under 23 with no NBA experience.”

The trade was still a smart one by the Clippers, except for protecting the pick. Which came back to bite them. Olshey suggested that protecting it would have killed the deal, and the chance was so remote that’s why they didn’t push.

But next year, in some similar situation, another GM is going to remember what happened to the Clippers and insist on top-three protections for the pick. (Meaning the next year’s pick would go to the trading partner.) And watch, the deal will still get done.

Wizards president Grunfeld thinks Wall should have been Rookie of the Year

T-Mobile Rookie Challenge and Youth Jam
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Ernie Grunfeld thinks that John Wall should have won the 2010-11 Rookie of the Year Award last season. That would be a pretty controversial statement if taken out of context, but the Wizards president made it clear that he didn’t think that Wall had a better year than Blake Griffin, who was the unanimous winner of the award. He simply thinks that Griffin, who was drafted in 2009, should not have been eligible for last year’s Rookie of the Year prize:

While discussing the Wizards’ prospects in the draft lottery, Grunfeld expressed his excitement with picking Wall as the franchise cornerstone last summer and said, “He should’ve been rookie of the year…except for the rule of a second-year player being eligible…

Grunfeld said the difference [between Griffin and Larry Bird and David Robinson, who also won Rookie of the Year awards despite not going directly to the NBA] was that Griffin actually spent a year in an NBA environment before making his debut in a regular season game. “Last year, I think Blake did play in a couple of preseason games and he traveled with his team, so he got a feel first. But that’s the rule, and he was deserving, obviously. He had a tremendous year. I thought John had a terrific year, also.”

Obviously, this is essentially pure semantics. Wall had the best year of any player drafted in 2010, and Griffin had the best year of any player who made his NBA debut in the 2010-11 season. Grunfeld seems to get that, both Wall and Griffin are breathtaking young talents, and this isn’t really a controversy. Grunfeld’s Wizards are projected to get the 4th overall pick after the draft lottery tonight, and have an 11.9% chance of getting the #1 overall pick for the second year in a row. Wall will be the Wizards’ draft representative at the lottery.