Tag: Dorell Wright

New Orleans Pelicans v Portland Trail Blazers

Portland reserve guard C.J. McCollum out at least month with fractured finger

1 Comment

Wesley Mathews has played well at the two guard spot for Portland this season, but the team leans on second-year player C.J. McCollum to get him some rest each game plus knock down some threes. Well, they did anyway.

McCollum will be out at least a month after a fracture to his right index finger suffered in the Trail Blazers win over the Pelicans Monday, the team has announced. The injury occurred in the fourth quarter: McCollum grabbed an offensive rebound and when he went back up was fouled on the hand by New Orleans’ Eric Gordon (you can see the play above).

McCollum will be re-evaluated in a month, but could be out a little longer.

McCollum has played just more than 13 minutes a game for Portland this season, averaging 5 points a game but knocking down 46 percent of his threes. He missed most of last season due to a foot injury.

With him out expect to see a little more Will Barton, and the Blazers could slide Nicolas Batum to the two and play Dorell Wright at the three. Terry Stotts has some options.

Report: Pacers to apply for disabled-player exception after Paul George’s injury

Paul George

Paul George is reportedly out for the season after his horrific leg injury.

Sometimes, those evaluations are inspired by public-relations – rather than medical – reasons. (See Serge Ibaka.)

The Pacers surely don’t want people repeatedly asking when George will return. Better to just put the matter behind them, for a season at least, by declaring him out now. If he comes back earlier, all the better, and a year of incessant questions will be avoided in the meantime.

But now Indiana will put that diagnosis before an impartial physician.

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

The Indiana Pacers are expected to apply to the NBA for a disabled player exception in the wake of forward Paul George’s gruesome broken leg, according to a league source.

The Pacers must convince an NBA-selected doctor George is “substantially more likely than not” to be out through June 15 to get the disabled-player exception (DPE). It would allow the Pacers to sign a player to a one-year contract worth up to $5,305,000, or they could trade for or claim off waivers a player who makes up to $5,405,000 and is on the final year of his contract.

There’s really no harm in applying. If the request is denied or Indiana gets, but doesn’t use, the DPE, there’s no consequence.

And it’s certainly possible the Pacers wouldn’t use it, especially not in full.

For one, they also have 15 players under contract, the regular-season limit. But Donald Sloan’s contract is fully unguaranteed, and Shayne Whittington’s is just $25,000 guaranteed. It wouldn’t be difficult to clear a roster spot.

The luxury tax presents a much larger problem.

Indiana is just $1,622,151 below the tax line. That room would almost assuredly increase if the Pacers take the necessary step of clearing a roster spot to make room for another player – to $2,570,314 if they waive Sloan for example. But even with the DPE, George would continue to count against the cap. Maybe Indiana also waives Whittington and/or Luis Scola, another player with a partially guaranteed contract, but that’s a lot of trimming.

And for what?

The best and best-fitting free agent on the market, Shawn Marion, is leaning toward signing with the Cavaliers. No other unrestricted free agents makes sense above the minimum with the exception of Ray Allen, but I sure don’t see him in Indiana.

The trade market could reveal more possibilities – Marco Belinelli (Spurs), Dorell Wright (Trail Blazers) and Luc Mbah A Moute (Timberwolves) to name a few ideas – a trade partner’s desired return and the tax-avoiding gymnastics necessary to facilitate a deal are probably too much for the Pacers.

Indiana would be wise to seek the DPE in case it proves useful. Even if the Pacers get it, George could return earlier than expected, and the player they acquired with the DPE would remain eligible.

But the most significant outcome of the application very well could be the public learning what a neutral doctor really thinks of George at this point. If that doesn’t seem very significant, that’s because it’s not (unless the request is denied).

Trail Blazers, Hawks, Magic have interest in Greg Monroe

LaMarcus Aldridge, Greg Monroe

The Lakers have expressed interest in Greg Monroe, and so did the Pelicans before they traded for Omer Asik.

There will – and should be – plenty of interest in the 24-year-old Pistons big man, who averaged at least 15.2 points and 9.3 rebounds per game each of the last three seasons.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

So far, the Trail Blazers’ interest is the only one to take seriously. I believe the Pistons will match any offer for Monroe, so unless a team offers a sign-and-trade, the Pistons wouldn’t let him walk for nothing now.

Portland could offer an intriguing deal centered on Nicolas Batum, who would fit a major need for Detroit. Wesley Matthews and Dorell Wright could form a less-desirable, though still possible, trade. Maybe the Trail Blazers would even offer Robin Lopez, whose minutes would likely be cut with Monroe in the fold. I’d guess Portland would want to keep Lopez for his defense – Monroe and LaMarcus Aldridge would have issues as a pairing – but the Trail Blazers are often offensive-minded.

For Atlanta and Orlando to have a serious chance, they’d probably have to propose sign-and-trades too.

If the Hawks offered Jeff Teague and/or Kyle Korver, the Pistons would at least have to listen. I don’t think that would be enough, but given the immediate fit of those two, it’s at least reasonable.

The Magic certainly wouldn’t trade Victor Oladipo, Aaron Gordon or Elfrid Payton for Monroe. That leaves them thin on desirable players, though draft picks could always be the centerpiece of a deal. I’d be surprised if Orlando traded a quality first rounder at this stage of their rebuilding, though.

Most likely, Monroe just returns to the Pistons, who could keep exploring trades once he’s under contract.

NBA Playoff Preview: San Antonio Spurs vs. Portland Trail Blazers

Damian Lillard, Tony Parker, Tim Duncan


San Antonio Spurs: 62-20

Portland Trail Blazers: 54-28


San Antonio Spurs: none

Portland Trail Blazers: none

OFFENSE/DEFENSE RANKINGS (points per 100 possession)

San Antonio Spurs: Offense 108.1 (7th in NBA), Defense 100.1 (4th in NBA)

Portland Trail Blazers: Offense 108.3 (5th in NBA), Defense 104.7 (16th in NBA)


1) How much does experience matter?

The attention increases, the lights brighten and the pressure mounts. Relative to the second round of the NBA playoffs, the first round is practically an extension of the regular season. The difference between the first two rounds, especially if you haven’t experienced it before is, stark.

From a purely mathematical standpoint, this makes sense. Going from 16 to 8 teams is a greater drop by magnitude than going from 30 to 16 teams.

If experiencing this level of the playoffs matters, San Antonio has a huge advantage.

Five Spurs – Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili, Boris Diaw and Matt Bonner – have each played more games beyond the first round than all the Trail Blazers combined.

Just three Trail Blazers have played in the second round to 13 Spurs.


2) How much do benches matter?

The Spurs’ reserves combined for 30.5 win shares this season. Give them a little more playing time, and maybe they could have competed for a playoff spot in the East.

The Trail Blazers’ reserves… well, they’re no longer historically bad, like they were last season. Mo Williams, Dorell Wright and Thomas have helped, but Portland still ranked last in bench scoring.

In the playoffs, benches matter less. There are no back-to-backs, so teams can more easily depend on their top players rather than their depth.

However, that’s less true in this series than most. Games 1 to 6 feature only one day off between each, and Game 7 would follow just a two-day break.

Still, that sure beats the regular-season pace of games.

If the teams’ benches will matter, it’s based mostly on what’s already happened.

Throughout the season, the Trail Blazers’ starters have carried a much bigger load than the Spurs’. Here are the 120 leaders in total minutes this season, including the playoffs:


Portland is the only team with two players in the top nine, three in the top 23, four in the top 31 and five in the top 56. No Spur ranks higher than No. 78.

San Antonio, despite needing a game longer to win its first-round series, should be better-rested than the Trail Blazers. Considering the age gap, the Spurs might need to be.

3) How much can LaMarcus Aldridge and Damian Lillard do?

As noted in the previous two keys, the Spurs have some decided advantages. The main question is how much they matter.

But the Trail Blazers might have the series’ two best players in LaMarcus Aldridge and Damian Lillard, and that definitely matters.

Aldridge and Lillard were both All-Stars, and Aldridge finished 10th in MVP voting. Although Tim Duncan and Tony Parker both received MVP votes – Lillard didn’t – Lillard is just 23. He’s better today than he was in October, and an award that considers an entire season’s body of work doesn’t necessarily reflect Lillard’s current ability.

Lillard (25.5 points on 47 percent shooting and 49 percent 3-point shooting, 6.7 assists, 6.3 rebounds and 1.3 steals per game) excelled against the Rockets, and so did Aldridge (29.8 points on 48 percent shooting, 11.2 rebounds and 2.7 blocks per game). These are stars playing their best at the exact right moment.

It won’t get any easier against the Spurs, though.

Lillard didn’t have to extend much energy defending Patrick Beverley, and Jeremy Lin gave him issues at times. The margin for error is greatly reduced against Parker. Can Lillard provide at least tolerable defense and still bring it offensively?

Aldridge has generally fared well against Tim Duncan, but Houston provided a model for slowing him. Aldridge didn’t fare as well against the Rockets’ jumbo power-forward-center combo, Dwight Howard and Omer Asik, and San Antonio the size to at least try replicating that strategy.

Plus, the Spurs are one of the NBA’s top defensive-rebounding teams, which could neutralize Portland’s excellent offensive rebounding. If Robin Lopez and Thomas Robinson need help creating second-chance opportunities, something the Trail Blazers depend on, Aldridge might have to move out of his preferred mid-range spots and work closer to the rim.

Lillard and Aldridge are true stars. San Antonio might prevent them from looking like it, though.


While debating the importance of experience and benches in the playoffs, I’ve ignored one key factor that definitely impacts postseason series: coaching. Terry Stotts has improved a great deal since coaching the Hawks and Bucks, and he has Rick Carlisle’s indirect help. With Nicolas Batum in the Shawn Marion role, the Trail Blazers’ can replicate the switching, mismatching defensive strategy that gummed up San Antonio’s offense in the last round. However, the Spurs adjusted then, and two good coaches might still not equal Gregg Popovich.

Spurs in 7

LaMarcus Aldridge ruining Dwight Howard’s chance at redemption

Dwight Howard, LaMarcus Aldridge

With his feet held to the fire, Dwight Howard brought the heat.

It took only one playoff game with the Houston Rockets for Howard’s detractors to come out in full force. He lacked the maturity and focus to win in the postseason, they shouted from all directions. But if Howard thought he could escape the spotlight by bolting Los Angeles for Houston, he was sadly mistaken.

Right now, though, Howard and his Rockets have a bigger problem to escape – LaMarcus Aldridge.

Aldridge coolly dismantled the Rockets. Again.

The Trail Blazers forward scored 43 points with eight rebounds and three blocks in Portland’s 112-105 Game 2 win Wednesday.

In two games, Aldridge has 89 points, 26 rebounds and five blocks. More importantly, the Trail Blazers have two wins in Houston.

Teams that open a best-of-seven series with two road wins have won 15 of 18, including sweeping half of them. With Portland rolling, having won seven straight and 11 of 12 dating back to the regular season, this series could join the quick enders.

Howard has lost his last seven and 11 of 13 playoff games, and for him, the doubters will grow only louder. Not even ultra-focused and effective starts will save him.

“We have to play inside out, play their bigs and make it a long night for those guys,” Howard told Jonathan Feigen of Ultimate Rockets before the game. “I have to demand the ball, get it and go to work.”

And he did.

Howard made his first six shots to notch Houston’s first 13 points, outscored the Trail Blazers by himself through the game’s first four minutes and was singlehandedly matching his teammates’ combined scoring  as late as three minutes remaining in the first half.

By halftime, he had 25 points, eight rebounds and two blocks.

His second-half production (seven points, six rebounds and two blocks) would be great for most players, but Howard isn’t most players. His physical talents lend themselves to the perception he should be more dominant – which a petty Shaquille O’Neal perpetuates during halftimes – and more is demanded of him.

Sometimes, that’s fair. Howard failed to pass out of double teams Wednesday, and his individual success remained isolated from team success. Howard’s teammates shot just 37 percent while he was on the court, and when he went cold (missing seven straight shots at one point), he still didn’t integrate his teammates well enough.

But sometimes, the demands on Howard reach unhealthy levels. He said he’d do more in Game 2, and he absolutely did. There are limits on what one player can contribute. Even if Howard didn’t perfectly parlay the attention he received into better looks for his teammates, James Harden (6-of-19 shooting) and Chandler Parsons (5-of-15 shooting) are certainly capable of doing more without their center’s help.

Not that anyone will forgive Howard for the shortcomings of his teammates. Howard’s playoff record is treated as his own although we all know postseason success requires a full team effort.

In a twist, Aldridge gets all the benefit of the doubt Howard doesn’t. Aldridge’s 46 points and 18 rebounds in a Game 1 victory gave him leeway Howard will never receive.

But Aldridge – who has never won a playoff series, let alone led a team to the NBA finals like Howard did the Magic – didn’t rest on his laurels.

He became the first player with consecutive 40-point playoff games since LeBron James in 2009 and just the second since Tracy McGrady in 2003.

Aldridge knifed through the Rockets’ defense off the ball and used expert footwork on the ball to create space, shooting 13-of-19 from mid-range.

aldridge shot chart 4-23-14

To be fair, Aldridge received help Howard didn’t.

Dorell Wright made 3-of-4 3-pointers and added a slick cutting dunk for 15 points on five shots. Damian Lillard shot just 3-for-14, but he got the line (10-of-12 on free throws) and kept the ball moving to the right spots (11 assists).

Howard vs. Aldridge was a tantalizingly fun matchup, and Rockets-Blazers is too. If not for a couple different breaks in an overtime game Sunday, the series could be tied 1-1. Heck, Houston wasn’t that far from winning Game 2.

But in Howard’s world, close doesn’t cut it. Only Aldridge’s.

Not that he needs the margin for error.