Tag: Dexter Pittman

Ersan Ilyasova, Ben Gordon

Bobcats waive Ben Gordon after deadline for him to join playoff roster


A year ago, the Charlotte Bobcats tried to trade Ben Gordon – and apparently couldn’t.

A week ago, they tried to buy out Gordon – and apparently couldn’t.

But they could waive him.

Bobcats news release:

Charlotte Bobcats President of Basketball Operations Rod Higgins announced today that the team has requested waivers on guard Ben Gordon. The Bobcats roster now stands at 14 players.

“With the recent acquisition of additional backcourt depth to our roster, we believe this is in the best interests of both parties,” Higgins said. “We want to thank Ben for his contributions over the past two seasons and wish him the best as he moves on in his career.”

By not waiving Gordon before midnight, the Bobcats ensured he’s not eligible for a playoff roster. This was either a negotiation gone nowhere or a “screw you” move by a team fed up with a player who’d been a bit petulant.

Assuming Gordon didn’t agree to a buyout – why would he after midnight? – he’ll get the remaining $ 3,571,765 he’s owed. So, if the Bobcats were trying to punish him, they’ll only go so far.

But this makes it unlikely any team signs Gordon for the rest of the season.

Teams not interested in the playoffs probably don’t want an over-the-hill veteran taking minutes from young players. Teams in the playoff hunt probably don’t want to waste time integrating a player who can’t play in the postseason.

But maybe there’s a middle-ground team who could use Gordon: the New York Knicks.

The Knicks’ playoff chances range from slim to none, but they’ve already traded their first- and second-round picks. They have no incentive to tank.

New York can make best use of its remaining games by making Carmelo Anthony happy before he enters free agency. Even if the Knicks miss the playoffs, a few extra wins could only help.

There’s no guarantee Gordon – who’s posted negative win shares this season and last, one of only nine players to do so* – would actually help New York. A shooter making just 37 percent of his 2-pointers and 28 percent of his 3-points tends to carry little value.

Which is why the playoff-bound Bobcats would rather pay Gordon to go away than keep him.

*The others: Al Harrington, Tornike Shengelia, Marquis Teague, Drew Gooden, Quincy Miller, Diante Garrett, Tyshawn Taylor and Dexter Pittman.

Bulls plan to limit Joakim Noah’s minutes to help plantar fasciitis

Tom Thibodeau

Joakim Noah says right now he feels no pain in his foot, no plantar fasciitis. That despite a summer where he worked out plenty, even training with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. His foot feels fine.

If the Bulls are going to be the contenders they think they are, Noah still has to be fine in April and May (then maybe June). Two of the past three seasons, he has been slowed by plantar fasciitis during the season and postseason.

That means coach Tom Thibodeau has to keep his minutes under control. Which he said he would do, something discussed by K.C. Johnson at the Chicago Tribune.

Thibodeau has said dropping Noah’s minutes is a priority, so both the All-Star center and the Bulls are hopeful the recurring problem becomes manageable. Aiding the situation will be Thibodeau’s trust in Nazr Mohammed. Though the Bulls tried hard to land Marcus Camby and Elton Brand to add big-man depth, not having Mohammed buried on the bench early like last season will help.

Mohammed is nice, but look for the Bulls to consider big men that are cut by other teams during camp. They could use more depth up front (unless you think Dexter Pittman or Malcolm Thomas are really the answers).

The bigger question is can Thibodeau keep Noah and Luol Deng from being right at the top of the league in minutes played? Is Thibodeau willing to sacrifice a couple regular season wins to get his guys rest and keep them fresh? He’s talking a good game but we need to see it in action to believe it.

UPDATE: It’s official, Heat sign veteran Juwan Howard

Oklahoma City Thunder v Miami Heat - Game Five

UPDATE 2:36 pm: Well, that didn’t take long.

The Miami Heat have announced the rumors that they were close to signing veteran Juwan Howard were not just rumors — they have inked him for the rest of the season, the team announced.

As noted below, Howard is not going to be asked by the Heat to do much other than practice hard to push guys and be a veteran presence in the locker room. Chris Andersen and Joel Anthony get the key big guy minutes off the bench now. In the finals last season Howard played only in the final minutes of the blowout Game 5 Heat win, it will be much the same this year. Howard has not been on an NBA roster this season but reportedly has worked out and stayed in shape. Either way, he’s going to get a paycheck and some level of playoff bonus check, which doesn’t suck for him. — Kurt Helin

12: 30 pm: The Heat have an open roster spot, and a team preparing to battle deep into the postseason could always use one more serviceable, veteran big man at the end of its bench.

It appears that 40-year-old Juwan Howard is the leading candidate to fill that role.

From Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports:

The Miami Heat are strongly considering signing 40-year-old forward Juwan Howard, league sources told Yahoo! Sports.

After playing the past two years with the Heat, Howard has remained unsigned this season. He has stayed in shape and has been working out throughout the season.

The Heat created a roster spot at the trade deadline, sending Dexter Pittman to the Memphis Grizzlies for a trade exception.

While a lack of size and rebounding issues have been weaknesses for this Heat team at times this season, bringing Howard back won’t be a way to fill either of those voids on the court.

Howard’s value is seen more in the locker room, and he knows the team well after being on the roster the past two seasons. His veteran presence will be more important than what he can provide by being in the actual lineup, if he ends up providing much of anything there at all.

During last year’s run to a title, Howard played just three minutes in five Finals games, and did so only in the Game 5 clincher, likely just to get his name into the box score.

Why no blockbusters at NBA trade deadline? Here are three reasons.

Boston Celtics v Los Angeles Lakers

The narrative of the NBA Trade Deadline 2013 is going to be that it was a dud.

Fans seemed to think the Lakers were going to trade Dwight Howard. Or the Celtics were going to blow it up and trade Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett. The fans expected blockbusters and some of the national media fanned that flame.

Instead, fans got J.J. Redick going to Milwaukee. And Dexter Pittman being traded. Can’t forget Pittman.

What happened? Here are three reasons

1) A lot of the trades being discussed never had any chance of happening. The Lakers were never going to trade Dwight Howard. Some people seemed to think the Lakers should trade Howard — from fans at the bar to breakdowns on SportsCenter. But if you asked the Lakers, or anyone around the Lakers, or any other team’s personnel that called the Lakers, the answer was always it was never going to happen. The Lakers did not waiver. Expectations always were way ahead of reality here.

It was the same with trading Kevin Garnett — he couldn’t have been more clear about not waiving his no trade clause. But nobody seemed to listen. And so it went on and on. Fans wanted to see the Bulls add talent when they would never take on more salary. We expected Josh Smith to get moved but Hawks GM Danny Ferry said all along he would hold on to Smith if no offer he really liked came along. And one didn’t.

We as basketball fans talked up expectations that got out of line with the reality of those trades happening.

2) The big trades we did get ended up happening earlier, not at the deadline. We like to think the NBA trade deadline is about big moves, one team trying to save money and another team trying to rebuild (or build up for a title run).

We had a big trade like that — James Harden was traded to the Houston Rockets before the start of the season so the Thunder could keep their finances in line. Rudy Gay was moved out of Memphis weeks ago to Toronto. Those are classic deadline deals, they just didn’t happen at the deadline this year.

If you start going father back you notice this is becoming a trend — Pau Gasol was moved to the Lakers in 2008 three weeks before the trade deadline. Teams aren’t really doing the big deals at the deadline nearly as often, they happen a little bit earlier. There are still big trades, but GMs are now doing them on their own terns and on their own timeframe, without the pressure that a hard deadline can bring.

3) The new luxury tax levels/repeater tax really does scare some teams off. This was the most commonly discussed reason and that’s because there is a lot of truth to it. In the past the Bobcats might have found someone to take on Ben Gordon — yes he’s overpaid but he can score and some team could live with that. But no teams want the tax consequences of that. Same with the much-shopped Brooklyn Nets combo of Kris Humphries, MarShon Brooks and a pick (the Nets offered that to every team save the Globetrotters).

This trend is not going away. The repeater tax will add $1 per every dollar you are over the tax line when you are over said line four out of five years. So there are going to be a lot of trade deadlines where you see teams do what the Warriors did — make a couple small moves to get under the tax line. The goal of the new tax rules was to stop teams from stockpiling talent, and that may happen. But it has worked on scaring teams for trading expensive contracts.

The real breakthrough will come if they stop giving Humphries $12 million a year in the first place.

Hakim Warrick to Orlando headlines small trades at deadline

Hakim Warrick, Jason Thompson

We didn’t get any blockbuster trades at this year’s NBA trading deadline. We saw Rudy Gay moved a few weeks before and J.J. Redick did get moved just before the deadline.

But a lot of what happened at the deadline was smaller deals that slid under the radar. Here is a quick wrap-up of those deals. If any of these impact your fantasy team, you’re doing it wrong.

• Probably the most recognizable name of the guys moved quietly at the deadline is Charlotte’s Hakim Warrick, who was traded straight up to Orlando, for Josh McRoberts. The Magic are expected to waive Warrick, he’s not really in their “build with youth” plan. That will make Warrick a free agent. Charlotte gets a bit younger but I’m not sure McRoberts gets a lot of burn there.

• Right at the deadline the Hawks traded Anthony Morrow to the Mavericks for Dahntay Jones. This was a swap of guys in the last years of their deals. Dallas gets a good shooter but a two guard and they already have O.J. Mayo and Vince Carter so it’s hard to see Morrow getting much time on the court, but Morrow is deadly at the corner three and Dallas loves those.

• Golden State was just a little over $1 million above the luxury tax line, and in the world of the new NBA repeater tax you should get under that line. So they did. The Warriors sent Jeremy Tyler to Atlanta and Charles Jenkins to Philadelphia, each for a second round pick.

• It wasn’t part of the original trade announcement, but you should know that Jason Collins is going from Boston to Washington as part of the Jordan Crawford deal. He will play behind Nene. Probably way behind Nene.

• Miami traded Dexter Pittman, who has spent most of the season in the D-League, to the Memphis Grizzlies, and has part of the deal the two teams will swap second round picks in 2013.