Tag: Detroit Pistons

Reggie Jackson

Report: Detroit Pistons sign restricted free agent Reggie Jackson for five-years, $80 million


This seems steep. Was there anyone else going to make a big play for him?

The Detroit Pistons traded for Reggie Jackson last season, and he finished the year strong once he adjusted to Stan Van Gundy’s system. He looked good running the pick-and-roll with Andre Drummond. It was expected that the Pistons would want to retain him.

They did — for five years at $80 million. So reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

Restricted free-agent guard Reggie Jackson has reached agreement on a five-year, $80 million extension with the Detroit Pistons, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Pistons president and coach Stan Van Gundy wanted to fully commit to Jackson as one of the franchise’s cornerstones and will do so with a substantial investment of $16 million per season. There is no player option in the contract, league sources said.

The question here isn’t should the Pistons have kept him — they did the right thing. He averaged 17.6 points a game with a PER of 19.8 after being traded to the Pistons (and his numbers near the end of the season were better than that). This is a guy they wanted to retain, someone Van Gundy sees as the future point guard for the Pistons.

The question is, did they have to pay him that much?

The Thunder a season ago offered him four-years, $48 million ($12 million per year) and he turned it down — that proved to be the smart move.

The Pistons rewarded him as a cornerstone player, but it’s hard to imagine anyone else saw him that way and would have bid within $10 million of that total price (if even that high). The Pistons could have let the market set his price and matched it. It’s a cold business, but the Pistons could have saved some money here.

That said, SVG lost Greg Monroe this year to a qualifying offer. He couldn’t risk that again, maybe that motivated the offer.

Also, with the cap about to spike by $40 million or so over two years thanks to the new television deal, the pain from overpaying a little here is not that serious. If he is as good as SVG believes, locking him in at this price will be a steal in a few years.

Report: Robin Lopez discussing $12 million per year deal with Knicks; Lakers also a consideration

New York Knicks v Portland Trail Blazers

The Lakers and the Knicks may be the biggest markets the NBA has to offer, but the current state of their respective rosters makes them less-than-desirable destinations from the perspective of the majority of the league’s marquee free agents.

LaMarcus Aldridge may technically be still deciding, but L.A., despite their second chance at convincing him, increasingly seems like a long shot. Greg Monroe, linked to the Knicks since the middle of last season, has already chosen to play somewhere else.

That leaves the glamor franchises clamoring to convince second-tier talent to sign, and Robin Lopez is the most recent name that has evidently garnered a significant level of interest.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Free agent center Robin Lopez discussing deal with Knicks that would earn him in range of $12M-$13M per season, league sources tell Yahoo.

Another serious consideration for Robin Lopez: The Lakers.

Lopez has evolved into an excellent defensive big man, and one who is at least capable on the offensive end of the floor. He averaged 9.6 points and 6.7 rebounds in Portland last season, while shooting 53.5 percent from the field in 27.8 minutes per contest. He’s a fine piece to build around, especially for teams like the Lakers and Knicks who are desperate at this point to add foundational pieces to the roster.

Report: Pistons signing Aron Baynes away from Spurs for up to $20 million over three years

Andre Drummond, Aron Baynes

The Spurs, with Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green locked up, appear to be going all-in for LaMarcus Aldridge.

They traded Tiago Splitter to the Hawks, clearing cap room. They need to keep that open for Aldridge and likely Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili.

So, if you want Aron Baynes, this is the time to strike.

Apparently, the Pistons really wanted Baynes.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Brandan Wright’s deal with the Grizzlies is probably worth about $17 over three years. So, we’re obviously dealing with imprecise figures here.

But no matter how you slice it, that’s a lot for Baynes.

Baynes is coming off a career year, averaging 6.6 points and 4.5 rebounds in 16.0 minutes per game. He can make mid-range jumpers, and he rebounds well. He’ll be a solid backup center to Andre Drummond.

But Baynes is already 28 and not very athletic. It’s hard to see much upside. Plus, he probably benefited from the Spurs’ system in ways he won’t in Detroit.

This is an overpay – not a crippling one, but an overpay nonetheless.

Report: Lakers and Knicks didn’t offer Greg Monroe maximum contracts (update: agent says otherwise)


Update: Ken Berger of CBSSports.com:

Howard Beck of Bleacher Report:

Look, I don’t know. David Falk has incentive to say his client had more max offers. The Knicks and Lakers have incentive to say they missed on Monroe due to their own financial decisions rather than on-court ineptitude.

Either way, I think it would have been reasonable for the Knicks and Lakers to offer or not offer Monroe the max. And if they didn’t offer the max, they surely came close.


Are the Lakers and Knicks striking out in free agency?

Or are they just being patient?

Score one for patience with Greg Monroe, who agreed to a three-year max contract with the Bucks.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Monroe plans to join a young core of talent with the Bucks, who made a strong commitment to Monroe after the Los Angeles Lakers and Knicks didn’t offer full maximum contracts, league sources said.

I think Monroe is worth a max contract to the Bucks and most teams with cap space this summer and a need for a center.

But the Lakers and Knicks, who have cap space and need centers, are different.

Part of the appeal of signing Monroe now is not having to compete for free agents with the huge number of teams that will have max cap space next summer. The Lakers and Knicks don’t have to worry as much about that, though. They can secure meetings with most, if not every, major free agent due to their prominent markets.

They can aim higher.

Presumably, they have more info about 2016 free agents than I do. If they think they have a legitimate chance at LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Dwight Howard, Al Horford or some other star, it’s fine to bid less for Monroe.

But here’s what confuses me with the Knicks: There were multiple reports of them being close to signing Monroe. Maybe those reports were just incorrect. If so, ignore this. But if they accurately reflected the Knicks’ perception, that’s troubling. Did they not realize Monroe would get a max offer elsewhere? If so, that’s a bad misread of the market, and that’s a bad sign going forward.

Lakers and Knicks fans should cautiously accept their teams missing on Monroe. But at a certain point, the Lakers and Knicks need to sign someone better to justify it.

Report: Greg Monroe signing a maximum contract with Bucks

Milwaukee Bucks v Detroit Pistons

The Knicks entered free agency as favorites to land two players: Greg Monroe and Arron Afflalo.

They got Afflalo.

They’re not getting Monroe.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

This is a nice signing for the Bucks. They’re taking advantage of a few market conditions that work in their favor now and only now:

1. They had max cap space due to Khris Middleton’s low cap hold. That will disappear once he officially signs his five-year, $70 million contract.

2. They also had cap space because so many of their players – including Jabari Parker, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Michael Carter-Williams and John Henson – are on low-paying rookie-scale contracts. Those players will be in line for major raises in coming seasons.

3. They’re locking Monroe into a max in the final year of the old-TV-contract money. As the salary cap skyrockets in coming years, his deal will look even better.

4. Because the cap has not yet exploded, they’re one of only so many teams with max space now. Next year, most of the league will have max cap space, and that makes it more difficult for small-market Milwaukee to compete.

Monroe provides the center the Bucks desperately need, and he should thrive no longer playing next to Andre Drummond. The lane will be much more clear for Monroe’s post moves.

Handling Jason Kidd’s aggressive defensive schemes will be a bigger challenge for Monroe, but perhaps Milwaukee can use its length to hide him to some degree.

Monroe should feel vindicated after accepting the Pistons’ qualifying offer last summer. The risky move has paid off for him, and his next deal should pay off for the Bucks.