Tag: Detroit Pistons

Andre Drummond

Stan Van Gundy says Pistons will now talk contract extension with Andre Drummond


The Detroit Pistons had some success near the end of the season with the Reggie Jackson/Andre Drummond pick and roll. This summer they locked up half that duo, paying Jackson more money than anyone else was going to.

Now they will turn their attention to Drummond.

Drummond is eligible for a contract extension this summer (it has to be signed by Oct. 31), and he’s a clear max player, he should get in the five-year, $90 million range of Damian Lillard and others. The Pistons are going to start talking to him about it, GM and coach Stan Van Gundy told Terry Foster of the Detroit News.

Pistons coach Stan Van Gundy said the team will begin contract extension talks with center Andre Drummond in the next couple of weeks, with hopes of locking him up to a long-term contract — likely a maximum contract extension.

Here’s the rub: Van Gundy and the Pistons don’t want Drummond to sign that deal. At least not right now.

They want him to do what Kawhi Leonard did for the Spurs — wait a year, giving the Pistons more cap flexibility next summer. He’d still get the same max money, and the Pistons aren’t about to let him go, it’s simply about team building.

If Drummond signs this summer, he will count about $21 million against the cap in 2016-17. If he doesn’t sign then he becomes a restricted free agent and he’d count $8.1 million against the cap. That is a savings of nearly $13 million and the Pistons could use that to upgrade the talent around Drummond.

Here is the potential downside for Drummond. He will be a max player if he stays healthy. If he injures himself, the Pistons are under no obligation to give him a max deal. He could lose millions.

As we have seen this summer, NBA players like security. With good reason. This is Drummond’s chance to go from wealthy to “my family is set up for generations” money and why would you risk not locking that in right now?

Only because the other things you want in your NBA career — the chance to win and compete for rings — is more likely if he waits a year.

It’s not an easy choice. Drummond is a franchise cornerstone player, and if he wants a max deal right now he will get it. The Pistons will pay that man his money. They’d just like him to wait a little before signing on the dotted line.

Report: Thunder will match Blazers’ max offer to Enes Kanter

Enes Kanter, Robbie Hummel

The Oklahoma City Thunder will keep Enes Kanter, but thanks to a hefty offer sheet from the Portland Trail Blazers, it’s going to cost them much more than they probably had initially planned.

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

Source indicates OKC will, as expected, match the 4-year, $70M offer sheet today for big man Enes Kanter, given Thursday by Portland.

This move was expected on the Oklahoma City side, but Kanter likely wouldn’t have gotten that much money from the Thunder without grabbing the offer sheet from the Blazers that ultimately forced his current team’s hand.

Oklahoma City acquired Kanter at the trade deadline last season, as part of a three-team deal that sent Reggie Jackson to the Pistons. His numbers jumped significantly with the Thunder in the latter part of the season, where Kanter averaged 18.7 points and 11 rebounds in 31.1 minutes per contest during 26 appearances.

The Thunder need his scoring inside, and having him as a legitimate option when opposing defenses focus on slowing Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook should make Oklahoma City a formidable threat next season.

Marcus Morris is ticked Phoenix traded him away from his twin brother Markieff

Markieff Morris, Marcus Morris

Last summer, twin brothers Marcus and Markeiff Morris both signed four-year contract extensions with the Phoenix Suns and they were excited to get to play side-by-side in the Valley of the Sun. They got their chance, more than 1,100 minutes together on the court last season — and when they were on the court together the Suns were basically dead even with their opponents (+0.5 per 48 minutes, with both an offensive and defensive rating of 103.8 points per 100 possessions).

That didn’t impress the Suns, who this summer traded Marcus to the Detriot Pistons.

When Marcus met the Detroit media, he didn’t hide the fact he was ticked to be moved away from his brother, via Perry A. Farrell of the Detriot Free Press.

“This gives me a chance to branch out. In my opinion, God works in mysterious ways, and He has plans for certain people. Everybody knew how bad I wanted to play with my brother. Phoenix knew. For them to trade me without consent or telling me was like a slap in the face, because of the contract I took from those guys and the money I took from them. I’m happy to be here. I’m a Piston. I’m a Bad Boy. I’m ready to get started.”

Welcome to the NBA, Marcus. It’s a cold-hearted business at times.

Morris will get his chance to prove the Suns made a mistake, fighting for minutes in Detroit with Anthony Tolliver, likely behind Ersan Ilyasova at the four. Then again, the Suns did keep the better brother in this deal.

But before we can worry about what Marcus does on the court, he’ll have to get past the legal issues he and his brother ran into this summer — both were charged with felony assault in Phoenix. Both have said they are confident they will prevail and that there is nothing to the charges, but will not speak in detail about them.

NBA max contract values for 2015-16


The NBA salary cap and luxury-tax lines came in higher than expected, which means max contracts will be worth more than expected.

Howard Beck of Bleacher Report:

Max contracts are determined by experience level with players split into three tiers (0-6 years, 7-9 years, 10+ years). Here’s how much players signing max deals this offseason will earn based on experience and length of the contract:

0-6 years experience (players such as Greg Monroe, Jimmy Butler, Kawhi Leonard)

Re-sign Sign elsewhere
One-year $16,407,000 $16,407,000
Two-year $34,044,525 $33,552,315
Three-year $52,912,575 $51,435,945
Four-year $73,011,150 $70,057,890
Five-year $94,340,250

7-9 years experience (LaMarcus Aldridge, Kevin Love, Marc Gasol, DeAndre Jordan, Paul Millsap)

Re-sign Sign elsewhere
One-year $19,689,000 $19,689,000
Two-year $40,854,675 $40,264,005
Three-year $63,497,025 $61,725,015
Four-year $87,616,050 $84,072,030
Five-year $113,211,750

10+ years experience (LeBron James)

Re-sign Sign elsewhere
One-year $22,970,000 $22,970,000
Two-year $47,662,750 $46,973,650
Three-year $74,078,250 $72,010,950
Four-year $102,216,500 $98,081,900
Five-year $132,077,500

Anthony Davis agreed to a max contract extension, and Damian Lillard will likely follow suit. Those begin with with the 2016-17 season, so their values won’t be known for another year. But with the salary cap rising under the new national TV contracts, Davis and Lillard stand to make a lot more than free agents this summer.

Report: Pistons reach two-year deal to retain Joel Anthony

Miami Heat v Detroit Pistons

Stan Van Gundy is going to start Andre Drummond at the five and Ersan Ilyasova as a stretch four next to him, with guys like Aron Baynes and Marcus Morris coming off the bench up front.

But like every coach, he’d like a little more depth up front.

Enter Joel Anthony.

The Pistons like what they saw from him last year (they traded for him from Boston at the start of the season) and now have reached a two-year deal to retain Joel Anthony as their third center, reports Vincent Ellis with the Detroit Free Press.

The 6-foot-9 center who provided a strong veteran presence in the locker room last season has agreed to a two-year, $5-million deal, according the person with firsthand knowledge of the situation. The second year of the contract is not guaranteed….

His playing time wasn’t consistent with Andre Drummond and Greg Monroe taking the majority of minutes at center, but he excelled when called upon. His player efficiency rating of 14.74 was a career high for the eight-year veteran.

For the record, that PER is below the league average (15). Best remembered for his time on LeBron’s Heat squads, Anthony doesn’t bring much on the offensive end, but he rebounds and defends, plus plays with a lot of energy. In the limited minutes he will get this season, that’s all the Pistons need.

At this price for one year, it’s a fair deal.