Tag: Detroit Pistons

Detroit Piston Introduce 2015 Draft Picks

Report: Pistons sign Darrun Hilliard to three-year contract


It was a bit surprising when the Pistons picked Darrun Hilliard with the No. 38 pick in the draft.

But they obviously liked the 3-and-D wing from Villanova then, and they haven’t changed course.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press:

If the Pistons haven’t officially signed Reggie Jackson, who agreed to an $85 million deal, they could fit Hilliard into cap space. Otherwise, they had to use part of their room exception. (Minimum-salary exceptions can be for up to two years.)

Giving Hilliard three years makes sense, because it gives the Pistons his Bird Rights if he plays well through three years. With a partially guaranteed second season and non-guaranteed third season, the downside is low for Detroit.

The Pistons’ more-immediate challenge is trimming the roster. They’re committed to 17 players, including Jackson and Joel Anthony, who has yet to formally sign. Danny Granger and Cartier Martin are prime candidates to get waived, and Reggie Bullock could fall in that group, too. There’s no rush. Detroit doesn’t need to reach a 15-man roster until the regular season begins.

So, these battles could extend into training camp. The Pistons will explore trades in that time, too.

Really, it shouldn’t be out of question to waive Hilliard if other players shine in the preseason. But given the contract he got today, I’d be shocked if Detroit seriously considers it no matter how he plays before his rookie year.

John Wall: “I’m getting paid the same as Reggie Jackson”

James Harden, John Wall

Two years ago, John Wall signed a five-year, $80 million extension with the Wizards. It was the max he could sign for, and as the Wizards’ franchise player and one of the league’s best point guards, he was absolutely deserving of that deal. Since then, though, the league’s new TV deal and the influx of money have led to a lot more contracts that size. Wall’s a little annoyed at what now looks like a deal that’s below market value.

From CSNWashington.com’s J. Michael:

“People talk about me getting $80 million, now you got people getting $85 million that haven’t made the All-Star (Game) or anything like that,” Wall said Tuesday while watching his summer league team compete vs. the Dallas Mavericks at Thomas & Mack Center. “I guess they came in at the right time. That new CBA kicked in and they’re good now. Reggie Jackson gets five years, $80 million. I’m getting the same as Reggie Jackson.”

Wall has a point, and this has long been a gripe that the NBA’s top players have had with the concept of the maximum salary. The league’s superstars are artificially capped in the amount of money they can earn, while lesser players’ values get inflated because of the market. Surely this will be a topic of discussion in the CBA negotiations in 2017.

Report: Thunder trading Perry Jones III to Celtics

Oklahoma City Thunder v Dallas Mavericks

After re-signing Kyle Singler and Enes Kanter, the Thunder have been trying to shed salary by moving some of their end-of-bench players. According to the Boston Herald‘s Steve Bulpett, they’ve reached a deal to trade former first-round pick Perry Jones III to the Celtics, along with a future second-rounder in exchange for a protected 2018 second-rounder from the Celtics.

Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman reports that the pick the Thunder are sending to Boston is a 2019 second-rounder from Detroit, which they acquired in the Reggie Jackson trade at the deadline.

The Thunder aren’t getting anything back in the deal outside of the pick — it’s entirely a salary-dumping move for them. Jones is set to make around $2 million next season, and shedding his salary will save them around $7 million in luxury tax. According to Mayberry, the roster spot created by the trade will likely go to 2014 first-round pick Josh Huestis, who spent last season in the D-League.

Jones hasn’t done much in his first three years in the league. He played 55 games last season but averaged just 4.6 minutes per game. Still, there’s no downside to this deal for the Celtics. They get a free second-round pick out of it and the outside chance that Jones might show something in a new environment. The Thunder needed to save money and they were able to cut salary without giving up one of their own picks. It’s a trade that makes sense for both sides.

Nets trade Steve Blake to Detroit for Quincy Miller

Los Angeles Lakers v Portland Trail Blazers

Stan Van Gundy likes shooters. Steve Blake may have other flaws, but he can shoot the rock — a career 38.5 percent from three who shot 35.2 percent from three for the Blazers last year (on draft night Portland traded him to Brooklyn).

Now Van Gundy has Blake to put out there and space the floor.

The Pistons traded for Blake and the Nets will get Quincy Miller, a trade the teams have already announced.

The Nets are expected to waive Miller.

The Pistons are going to start just re-signed Reggie Jackson then they have Blake and Brandon Jennings behind him. Jennings provides playmaking, Blake shooting.

Report: Bucks and John Henson closing in on contract extension

Milwaukee Bucks Summer Block Party and Jersey Unveiling
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Greg Monroe, Khris Middleton, Jabari Parker, Michael Carter-Williams, Giannis Antetokounmpo.

The Bucks have a nice young core signed through at least next season.

They’d like to add John Henson to the list.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

The Milwaukee Bucks are in advanced negotiations toward a contract extension with promising big man John Henson, according to league sources.

Henson will make $2,943,221 next season. His extension would begin in 2016-17.

If Henson’s salary in the first year of his extension exceeds $7,358,052 (250% his previous salary), that would immediately cut into the Bucks’ 2016 cap room – a fact that the Bucks should strongly consider. There’s value in locking him up now: avoiding the risk of Henson signing a huge offer sheet as a restricted free agent, preventing him from accepting the qualifying offer to become an unrestricted free agent in 2017 and keeping him happy. But even after the signing Greg Monroe, Milwaukee projects to have plenty of cap space next summer as the salary cap skyrockets. It might make sense to wait, take advantage of Henson’s low cap hold and then re-sign him next summer.

Henson could make the same salary in either scenario. He’d just have to wait a year to officially sign.

Of course, that carries risk for Henson. He could gain security by putting the Bucks’ cap concerns at ease and taking less than his market value, which far eclipses $7,358,052. Maybe that tradeoff – increasing Henson’s cap hold next summer for long-term savings with him – would appease Milwaukee.

Henson is a good defender and excellent shot-blocker. He had to play a lot of center last season, but Monroe will allow him to slide to more power forward, where Henson’s and his thin frame won’t take quite as much of a pounding.

There’s good reason for the Bucks to keep him – just less so for them to do it through a contract extension rather than a re-signing. But there’s plenty of middle ground to find a reasonable extension.